Research

Elin Björling

Autumn 2020

SCAN Research Group: Improving usability of a home-based respiratory virus sample collection process for community surveillance of SARS-CoV-2

The Seattle Coronavirus Assessment Network (SCAN) study is a research initiative focused on community-level surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 and the development of pandemic-preparedness infrastructure. SCAN’s use of self-collected nasal specimens and remote enrollment processes for monitoring the spread of Covid-19 is an innovative method for increasing disease surveillance and testing capacity in a pandemic setting, especially in populations underrepresented in traditional clinical surveillance.

SCAN is looking for 2-5 students to assist with improving the accessibility, usability, and optimization of the SCAN research participant end-to-end experience as well as increase overall lab testing capacity. Activities will include evaluating the usability of the current SCAN process and messaging, identifying key areas of improvement, and assisting with the design and implementation of process and user experience improvements. This DRG will be run by Lincoln Pothan at the Brotman Baty Institute for Precision Medicine, with guidance from Elin Bjorling in the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering.

Requirements

  • Usability testing experience
  • User research / UI experience / design
  • The meeting day/time per week will be determined by the group. We will have twice weekly team meetings for 30 min and other meetings may be established for specific tasks.

To express your interest, please complete this survey form by 9/25/2020.


Autumn 2020

Project EMAR

This DRG is full for Autumn and no longer accepting applications.

This DRG will be conducted remotely over Zoom.

Adolescents are subject to high levels of stress in their lives, resulting from school, relationships, and family life. Not surprisingly, school stress is most commonly reported as the biggest source of stress for teens. Therefore, accurately measuring and intervening to reduce teen stress is imperative to support this vulnerable population.

Social robots are being used to help other populations, such as the elderly and young children. However, there is very little research on either the experience of stress in teens, or the interactions between teens and robots. This presents a unique research opportunity in the field of human-robot interaction (HRI).

Our interdisciplinary team is working on three projects for Fall quarter: (1) design and development of robotic movement and haptics interfaces, (2) implementation and testing of intuitive social robot programming tools, and (3) building out and launching a website for data collection from teens and visualization of collected data. 

The team is led by Elin Björling (Human-Centered Design and Engineering) and Maya Cakmak, (Computer Science and Engineering). For more information about Project EMAR, see our blog at blogs.uw.edu/EMAR.

This DRG is full for Autumn and no longer accepting applications.


Autumn 2020

Project RESeT: Relaxation Environment for Stress in Teens

This DRG is full for Autumn and no longer accepting applications.

This DRG will be conducted remotely over Zoom.

Facilitators

Background

Today’s teens are suffering from increased stress and depression, impacting their mental and physical health. A great deal of stress stems from school and academics, thus we are working to design a self-administered VR station aimed to reduce student stress.

Our Focus

In order to provide an intervention tool that is successful in reducing stress in teens, we first must engage teens in the design of such a tool.  Therefore, we use a participatory approach to human-centered design, specifically co-design, working with teens and using evidenced-based data at each state of the design process. We are currently in year two of the project and have a workflow involving rapid cycles of research, design and development, testing, and implementation.

This DRG is full for Autumn and no longer accepting applications.

 


Dr. Björling's Research Group archive