Research

Andrew Davidson's Research Group Archive

The following research group descriptions are archived because they are no longer offered, the faculty member is on sabbatical, or the group is taking a break. Please contact the faculty member or an advisor to learn more about these groups.


HCD charrette for K-12 outreach

Winter 2019

For the past few years, we have been using a design activity known as a charrette as a way to introduce students to the human centered design (HCD) process. In the "HCD Charrette," students are given a particular design space to explore (such as user interfaces for a website, mobile app, or a physical device). In a very short period of time (two hours or less), working in small groups, they brainstorm user needs, develop use-case scenarios, and create interaction designs for an application. We have run these participatory workshops with students at various educational levels, from middle school to graduate programs, and with K-12 teachers.

A fast-paced, hands-on activity that gives a good first-hand overview of the entire field, the HCD Charrette allows students to experience the thrill of design, while raising questions about its practice, setting the stage for further study. It is adaptable to many different application areas and levels of expertise and interest.

We firmly believe that participatory activities such as this HCD Charrette are far more effective as outreach and recruiting for HCDE than traditional college information sessions. Our long-term goal is to use the HCD Charrette for broad outreach and recruiting in the K-12 environment. We also intend to evaluate this program and practice, and to expand its reach.

In a dub talk (July 5, 2017), “Filling the Pipeline: Design & Engineering Workshops for K-12 Outreach,” we summarized various HCDE outreach efforts. Further information about the HCDE K-12 Outreach program may be found here: hcde.uw.edu/about/k12.

In this DRG, we will continue to broaden our outreach efforts for human centered design in the K-12 environment. UW student teams will facilitate an HCD Charrette in local school classrooms. Students will meet with classroom teachers to understand their students, learning goals, and environment. Curricula and materials for the HCD Charrette exist and students adapt these materials, customizing them for specific classroom needs. Charrette teams will visit local high school classrooms and lead students in the workshop. They will assess the results of the workshops and prepare a report on their findings. We will use these findings to further develop the HCD Charrette protocol.

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic students to participate in this project. Eligible students should be familiar with the User Centered Design process, and have already taken HCDE 210, 318, or 518. Experience working with, teaching, or mentoring young students is a plus.

Questions? Please contact:

  • Andrew Davidson <adavid7@uw.edu>, HCDE faculty, K-12 Outreach director
  • Samantha West <samwest@uw.edu>, HCDE MS student, K-12 Outreach coordinator

Alternative spring break: HCDE workshop

Winter 2019

  • Would you like to do something meaningful on your spring break this year?
  • Would you like to play an important role in K-12 outreach for HCDE and the UW?
  • Are you interested in traveling to rural Washington to mentor middle and high school students?

Alternative Spring Break (ASB) is an outreach program organized by the UW’s Pipeline Project. It provides opportunities for teams of undergraduate students to spend their spring break in a rural or tribal community of Washington State, working with local schools.

This year, in partnership with the Pipeline Project, HCDE is running its third ASB program, and will send two teams of undergraduates to Neah Bay, Washington, the Makah Tribe town, to lead middle and high school students in an HCDE Workshop.

The workshop will focus on physical computing for citizen science, using the Circuit Playground Express (Arduino) platform. Over the course of the week, the workshop students, guided by the HCDE student team, will develop and deploy a scientific instrument that can be used to gather field data.

HCDE Alternative Spring Break 2017

hcde.uw.edu/videos/asb

The above video captures the experience of the first HCDE Pipeline ASB project team in 2017. You can also read more about the team's work here: hcde.uw.edu/news/hcde-alternative-spring-break-recap.

To prepare for the ASB workshop, the HCDE student team will participate in a winter quarter DRG. In the DRG, they will develop and pilot the curriculum, learn the essentials of engaging with students in their community, and generally prepare for this outreach adventure. The DRG will meet one evening each week (either Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday, TBD) from 6:00 — 8:00 pm.

In addition to registering for this 2-credit DRG, participants must also be willing to spend spring break week (March 23 – 29, 2019) on the ASB trip. Housing, transportation, food, and incidental expenses for the trip will be arranged and paid for by the department.

For the ASB workshop, we are seeking dedicated and enthusiastic undergraduates with generous spirit who are passionate about mentoring and inspiring young learners. Participants must be a current HCDE undergraduate student, and have completed HCDE 210 or HCDE 318, and ideally also HCDE 439.

To apply for the program, please fill out this online application «goo.gl/forms/AYKvkU0f5l4ITjR83» by Saturday, November 24 at 11:59 pm.

In the application, you will be asked to submit your resume, in PDF form, and to answer a number of essay questions, but you do not have to complete them all in the same session. This is a summary of the essay questions:

  • Why are you interested in the ASB project? Tell us about your academic and personal goals, and how ASB might help you achieve them.
  • What experiences do you have working with, teaching, or mentoring teens and children?
  • An important part of ASB is working as part of a closely-knit team. What personal characteristics and experiences do you have that will positively contribute to the team dynamic?
  • Relate an experience in which you worked with an individual or group from a different background than your own. What did you learn from the experience?
  • What aspect of human centered design do you find most compelling, and why?
  • Do you have any special interests, skills, or experience that you think would be useful on an ASB team?
  • Is there anything else that you would like to share with us?

We will also require an interview with selected applicants between November 26 and December 7. Students who are accepted to the program will be notified by December 11.

If you are interested in this exciting opportunity to make a difference in young people’s lives, inspire them about the potential of human centered design and a college education, to learn about and engage with communities in rural Washington, and enrich your life in many ways, please consider applying for the HCDE ASB program!

If you have any questions about the program or the application process, please get in touch with one of us:


UCD Charette for K-12 Outreach

Spring 2018

For the past few years, we have been using a design activity known as a charette as a way to introduce students to the user-centered design (UCD) process. In the "UCD Charette," students are given a particular design space to explore (such as user interfaces for a website, mobile app, or a physical device). In a very short period of time (two hours or less), working in small groups, they brainstorm user needs, develop use-case scenarios, and create interaction designs for an application. We have run these participatory workshops with students at various educational levels, from middle school to graduate programs, and with K-12 teachers.

A fast-paced, hands-on activity that gives a good first-hand overview of the entire field, the UCD Charette allows students to experience the thrill of design, while raising questions about its practice, setting the stage for further study. It is adaptable to many different application areas and levels of expertise and interest.

We firmly believe that participatory activities such as this UCD Charette are far more effective as outreach and recruiting for HCDE than traditional college information sessions. Our long-term goal is to use the UCD Charette for broad outreach and recruiting in the K-12 environment. We also intend to evaluate this program and practice, and to expand its reach.

In a recent dub talk (July 5, 2017), “Filling the Pipeline: Design & Engineering Workshops for K-12 Outreach,” we summarized the various HCDE outreach efforts.

In this DRG, we will continue to broaden our outreach efforts for human centered design in the K-12 environment. UW student teams will facilitate a a UCD Charette in local high school classrooms. Curricula and materials for the UCD Charrette have already been developed. Students will use existing charrette materials, adapting and customizing them for specific classroom needs. Teams will go into the classroom and lead students in the exercise. They will assess the results of the workshops and prepare a report on their findings. We will use these findings to further develop the UCD Charette protocol.

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic students at all levels (BS to PhD) to help with this project. Eligible students should be familiar with the User Centered Design process, and have already taken HCDE 210, 318, or 518. Experience working with, teaching, or mentoring young students is a plus.


Alternative Spring Break: HCDE Workshop

Winter 2018

Would you like to do something meaningful on your spring break this year?
Would you like to play an important role in K-12 outreach for HCDE and the UW?
Are you interested in traveling to rural Washington to mentor middle and high school students?

Alternative Spring Break (ASB) is an outreach program organized by the UW’s Pipeline Project. It provides opportunities for teams of undergraduate students to spend their spring break in a rural or tribal community of Washington State, working with local schools.

This year, in partnership with the Pipeline Project, HCDE is running its second ASB program, and will send two teams of undergraduates to Neah Bay, Washington, the Makah Tribe town, to lead middle and high school students in an HCDE Workshop.

The workshop will focus on digital storytelling using the Scratch programming system. Over the course of the week, the workshop students, guided by the HCDE student team, will create and program animation and interactive media projects using Scratch to tell stories of their culture or explore math and science principles.

Video: HCDE Alternative Spring Break 2017

The above video captures the experience of the first HCDE Pipeline ASB project team last year. You can also read more about the team’s work here: hcde.uw.edu/news/hcde-alternative-spring-break-recap.

To prepare for the ASB workshop, the HCDE student team will participate in a winter quarter DRG. In the DRG, they will develop and pilot the curriculum, learn the essentials of engaging with students in their community, and generally prepare for this outreach adventure. The DRG will meet on Tuesdays from 6:00 — 8:00 pm.

In addition to registering for this 2-credit DRG, participants must also be willing to spend spring break week (March 18 – 24, 2018) on the ASB trip. Housing, transportation, food, and incidental expenses for the trip will be arranged and paid for by the department.

For the ASB workshop, we are seeking dedicated and enthusiastic undergraduates with generous spirit who are passionate about mentoring and inspiring young learners. Participants must be a current HCDE undergraduate student, and have completed HCDE 210 or HCDE 318, and HCDE 310.


UCD Charette for K-12 Outreach

Autumn 2017

Elena Agapie, HCDE PhD Student
Andrew Davidson, HCDE Faculty

Autumn 2017 | HCDE 496/596
Meetings: Thursdays, 4–5:30 p.m.

For the past few years, we have been using a design activity known as a charette as a way to introduce students to the user-centered design (UCD) process. In the "UCD Charette," students are given a particular design space to explore (such as user interfaces for a website, mobile app, or a physical device). In a very short period of time (two hours or less), working in small groups, they brainstorm user needs, develop use-case scenarios, and create interaction designs for an application. We have run these participatory workshops with students at various educational levels, from middle school to graduate programs, and with K-12 teachers.

A fast-paced, hands-on activity that gives a good first-hand overview of the entire field, the UCD Charette allows students to experience the thrill of design, while raising questions about its practice, setting the stage for further study. It is adaptable to many different application areas and levels of expertise and interest.

We firmly believe that participatory activities such as this UCD Charette are far more effective as outreach and recruiting for HCDE than traditional college information sessions. Our long-term goal is to use the UCD Charette for broad outreach and recruiting in the K-12 environment. We also intend to evaluate this program and practice, and to expand its reach.

In a recent dub talk (July 5, 2017), “Filling the Pipeline: Design & Engineering Workshops for K-12 Outreach,” we summarized the various HCDE outreach efforts. The video of this talk should be available there soon, if it is not already.

In this DRG, we will continue to broaden our outreach efforts for human centered design in the K-12 environment. UW student teams will facilitate a a UCD Charette in local elementary and middle school classrooms. Curricula and materials for the UCD Charrette have already been developed. Students will use existing charrette materials, adapting and customizing them for specific classroom needs. Teams will go into the classroom and lead students in the workshop. They will assess the results of the workshops and prepare a report on their findings. We will use these findings to further develop the UCD Charette protocol.

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic students at all levels (BS to PhD) to help with this project. Eligible students should be familiar with the User Centered Design process, and have already taken HCDE 210, 318, or 518. Experience working with, teaching, or mentoring young students is a plus.

 


UCD Charette for K-12 Outreach

Spring 2017

Catie Baker, CSE PhD Student
Andrew Davidson, HCDE Faculty

For the past few years, we have been using a design activity known as a charette as a way to introduce students to the user-centered design (UCD) process. In the "UCD Charette," students are given a particular design space to explore (such as user interfaces for a website, mobile app, or a physical device). In a very short period of time (two hours or less), working in small groups, they brainstorm user needs, develop use-case scenarios, and create interaction designs for an application. We have run these participatory workshops with students at various educational levels, from middle school to graduate programs, and with K-12 teachers.

A fast-paced, hands-on activity that gives a good first-hand overview of the entire field, the UCD Charette allows students to experience the thrill of design, while raising questions about its practice, setting the stage for further study. It is adaptable to many different application areas and levels of expertise and interest.

We firmly believe that participatory activities such as this UCD Charette are far more effective as outreach and recruiting for HCDE than traditional college information sessions. Our long-term goal is to use the UCD Charette for broad outreach and recruiting in the K-12 environment. We also intend to evaluate this program and practice, and to expand its reach.

In this DRG, we will continue to broaden our outreach efforts for human centered design in the K-12 environment. UW student teams will facilitate a a UCD Charette in local high school and/or middle school classrooms. Students will plan and prepare the charette activities, and then go into the classroom and lead students in the exercise. Teams will assess the results of the workshops and prepare a report on their findings. We will use these findings to further develop the UCD Charette protocol. 

Additionally, we will be creating a website for the outreach program. The goal of this website is to provide information for local teachers who are interested in having us visit their classroom and resources for anyone who would like to lead their own charettes.   

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic students at all levels (Bachelor to PhD) to help with this project. HCDE DFA students and HCDE 210 alumni are especially welcome to apply. Only students willing to commit to at least 3 credit hours will be considered. 


Designing Interactivity in the Urban Landscape - II

Spring 2017

EXPLORE interactivity with large screen interfaces!
INVESTIGATE sensors and gestural interactions!
DESIGN for a high-profile interactive public display wall!

This is the continuing on going project for interactive displays at the West Campus Utility Plant (WCUP) - a brand new major power plant installation on the UW Campus located on University Way. The facility contains 12 large, street-facing, high-resolution screens. This DRG will explore and implement prototype interactions for this display, enabling passersby to gain an understanding of the University’s commitment to the environment and energy conservation, and enhancing public perception of UW Campus and UW sustainability profile. Team members will investigate possible gestural, sensor-driven interactions and incorporate feeding live data to the responsive displays. 

The WCUP displays are intended to be a permanent installation on the UW campus, and student work will be considered for showcasing at a project launch or in the media.

This project is sponsored by the Office of the UW Architect, This DRG requires dedicated and enthusiastic students at all levels (BS to PhD) to help with the project. We will be limiting participation to a small number of students. Only those willing to commit to at least 3 credit hours will be considered.

Ideal candidates will have some of the following knowledge/skills:

User Research
Contextual inquiry
UI Prototyping
Physical Computing/Electronic s
HTML+CSS+Javascript
D3
Information Visualization

The project team will meet for 1.5 hours per week (Thursday afternoons, 3:30-5:00) and will run over the 10 week term. It may be extended beyond Spring quarter, depending on the project outcome and success.

Credits: 3

Faculty:
Brock Craft
Andy Davidson
Tyler Fox


Human Centered Design Workshop for Alternative Spring Break

Winter 2017

  • Would you like to do something meaningful on your spring break this year?
  • Would you like to play an important role in K-12 outreach for HCDE and the UW?
  • Are you interested in traveling to rural Washington to mentor middle school students?

If so, consider applying for the first Human Centered Design Workshop for Alternative Spring Break!

Alternative Spring Break (ASB) is an outreach program organized by the UW’s Pipeline Project. It provides opportunities for teams of undergraduate students to spend their spring break in a rural or tribal community of Washington State, working with local elementary and middle schools.

This year, in partnership with the Pipeline Project, HCDE is launching its first ASB program, and will send a team of five undergraduates to lead middle school students in a Human Centered Design Workshop. HCDE students will work with the school and community leaders to identify a problem or need that can be addressed by our user-centered design process. Over the course of a week, the middle school students, guided by the HCDE student team, will research the problem, design and prototype a solution, and present their project idea. This workshop will build on HCDE’s existing UCD Charette for K-12 Outreach program.

To prepare for the ASB workshop, HCDE students will participate in a winter quarter DRG. In the DRG, we will develop and pilot the curriculum, learn the essentials of engaging with middle school students in their community, and generally prepare for this outreach adventure.

If you are interested in this exciting opportunity to make a difference in young people’s lives, inspire them about the potential of human centered design and a UW education, and to learn about and engage with communities in rural Washington, consider applying for the DRG.

In addition to registering for this 3-credit DRG, you must also be willing to spend your spring break week on the ASB trip. Housing, transportation, food, and incidental expenses for the trip will be arranged and paid for by the department. The DRG meeting time will accommodate the schedules of students who are accepted to the program.

We are seeking five dedicated and caring students for the workshop. To apply, please fill out this application. The deadline is December 2, 12:00 noon.

Note that the application requires answering a number of essay questions, but you do not have to complete them all in the same session. This is a summary of the questions:

  • Why are you interested in this project? What are your academic and personal goals, and how might ASB help you achieve them?
  • What experiences do you have working with children and/or youth?
  • An important part of Alternative Spring Break is the team. What personal characteristics (talents, skills, knowledge, etc.) do you have that will contribute to the team aspect of ASB?
  • Talk about an experience in which you worked with an individual or group from a different background than your own. What did you learn from the experience?
  • What aspect of human centered design do you find most compelling and why?
  • Is there anything else about you that you'd like to share with us?

We will also require an interview with selected candidates during the week of December 5–9 before offering places in the program.

If you have any questions about the program or the application process, please get in touch with one of us.

Catie Baker, HCDE Outreach RA
Andrew Davidson, HCDE Faculty


Measuring Teen Stress with a Social Robot

Winter 2017

During Winter 2017 quarter, we are running an interdisciplinary DRG to explore human-robot interactions among teens in a local high school with our low-fidelity prototype of EMAR. We will observe teens engaging and responding to EMAR’s questions regarding their stress and mood. DRG student teams will analyze and assess these interactions, as well as interview teens about their interactions with EMAR.

Research questions we plan to explore are:

  1. What kinds of robot interactions are appropriate for gauging whether teens feel “heard”?
  2. What kind of social interactions (person to person) result from engaging with EMAR?
  3. What barriers do teams encounter in deploying the EMAR prototypes?

Our team

The team is led by UW Tacoma faculty member Dr. Elin Björling, a stress researcher who studies adolescents. Collaborators include Dr. Emma Rose, UW Tacoma Assistant Professor and UX researcher; and Andrew Davidson, HCDE Senior Lecturer and physical computing specialist.

Background

Adolescents are subject to high levels of stress in their lives, resulting from school, relationships, and family life. Not surprisingly, school stress is most commonly reported as the biggest source of stress for teens. Therefore, accurately measuring teen stress within a student’s school setting can be a valuable way to assess how students are doing and to provide useful feedback for school staff making efforts to reduce student stress.

Social robots are being used to help other populations, such as the elderly and young children. However, there is very little research on either the experience of stress in teens, or the interactions between teens and robots. This presents a unique research opportunity in the field of human-robot interaction (HRI).

Our interdisciplinary team is using participatory, human-centered design to develop a social robot that can measure teen stress in a high school setting. So far, we have developed initial prototypes of a social robot, named EMAR (Ecological Momentary Assessment Robot), and performed preliminary research with teens.

Designing a Social Robot to Assess Teen Stress Using Human-Centered Approach
dub research talk, 8/10/16, by Elin Björling and Emma Rose about the project


UCD Charette for K-12 Outreach

Autumn 2016

Catie Baker, CSE PhD Student
Andrew Davidson, HCDE Faculty

For the past few years, we have been using a design activity known as a charette as a way to introduce students to the user-centered design (UCD) process. In the "UCD Charette," students are given a particular design space to explore (such as user interfaces for a web site, mobile app, or a physical device). In a very short period of time (two hours or less), working in small groups, they brainstorm user needs, develop use-case scenarios, and create interaction designs for an application. We have run these participatory workshops with students at various educational levels, from middle school to graduate programs, and with K-12 teachers.

A fast-paced, hands-on activity that gives a good first-hand overview of the entire field, the UCD Charette allows students to experience the thrill of design, while raising questions about its practice, setting the stage for further study. It is adaptable to many different application areas and levels of expertise and interest.

We firmly believe that participatory activities such as this UCD Charette are far more effective as outreach and recruiting for HCDE than traditional college information sessions. Our long-term goal is to use the UCD Charette for broad outreach and recruiting in the K-12 environment. We also intend to evaluate this program and practice, and to expand its reach.

In this DRG, we will continue our outreach efforts for human centered design in the K-12 environment. UW student teams will facilitate a a UCD Charette in local high school and/or middle school classrooms. Students will plan and prepare the charette activities, and then go into the classroom and lead students in the exercise. Teams will assess the results of the workshops and prepare a report on their findings. We will use these findings to further develop the UCD Charette protocol.

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic HCDE students at all levels (Bachelor to PhD) to help with this project. HCDE DFA students and HCDE 210 alumni are especially welcome to apply. We will be limiting this DRG to a small number of participants. Only students willing to commit to at least 3 credit hours will be considered.
 


Measuring Teen Stress with a Social Robot

Autumn 2016

Facilitators

  • Elin Björling, UW Tacoma
  • Andrew Davidson, UW HCDE
  • Emma Rose, UW Tacoma

Adolescents are subject to high levels of stress in their lives, resulting from school, relationships, and family life. Not surprisingly, school stress is most commonly reported as the biggest source of stress for teens. Therefore, accurately measuring teen stress within a student’s school setting can be a valuable way to assess how students are doing and to provide useful feedback for school staff making efforts to reduce student stress.

Social robots are being used to help other populations, such as the elderly and young children. However, there is very little research on either the experience of stress in teens, or the interactions between teens and robots. This presents a unique research opportunity in the field of human-robot interaction (HRI).

Our interdisciplinary team is using participatory, human-centered design to develop a social robot that can measure teen stress in a high school setting. So far, we have developed initial prototypes of a social robot, named EMAR (Ecological Momentary Assessment Robot), and performed preliminary research with teens.

Our team

The team is led by UW Tacoma faculty member Dr. Elin Björling, a stress researcher who studies adolescents. Collaborators include Dr. Emma Rose, UW Tacoma Assistant Professor and UX researcher; and Andrew Davidson, HCDE Senior Lecturer and physical computing specialist. We are interested in engaging UW students in this project.

During Autumn 2016 quarter, we are offering an interdisciplinary DRG to explore human-robot interactions among teens in a local high school with our low-fidelity prototype of EMAR. We will observe teens engaging and responding to EMAR’s questions regarding their stress and mood. DRG student teams will analyze and assess these interactions, as well as interview teens about their interactions with EMAR. Research questions we plan to explore:

  1. What kinds of robot interactions are appropriate for gauging whether teens feel “heard”?
  2. What kind of social interactions (person to person) result from engaging with EMAR?
  3. What barriers do teams encounter in deploying the EMAR prototypes?

Interested students

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic UW students at all levels (Bachelors to PhD) to help with this project. We will be limiting this DRG to a small number of participants. Students will be expected to register for at least 3 credit hours. This project is open to students from both UW Seattle and UW Tacoma campuses.

The DRG participants will meet weekly, as noted above. Seattle and Tacoma teams will meet on their respective campuses, and we will arrange a video teleconference between them.

You should apply if you are interested in technology, physical computing, psychology, design, working with teens, or robots.


UCD Charrette for K-12 Outreach

Autumn 2015- Winter 2016

Elena Agapie, HCDE PhD Student
with
Andrew Davidson, HCDE Faculty
Emma Rose, UW Tacoma Faculty
Kiley Sobel, HCDE PhD Student

IMG_1393

For the past few years, we have been using a design activity known as a charrette as a way to introduce students to the user-centered design (UCD) process. In the "UCD Charrette," students are given a particular design space to explore (such as user interfaces for a web site, mobile app, or a physical device). In a very short period of time (two hours or less), working in small groups, they brainstorm user needs, develop use-case scenarios, and create interaction designs for an application. We have run these participatory workshops with students at various educational levels, from middle school to graduate programs, and with K-12 teachers.

A fast-paced, hands-on activity that gives a good first-hand overview of the entire field, the UCD Charrette allows students to experience the thrill of design, while raising questions about its practice, setting the stage for further study. It is adaptable to many different application areas and levels of expertise and interest. For a view of a recent version in HCDE 518, User-Centered Design, see this photo album: flic.kr/s/aHsk4yu8Rz.

We firmly believe that participatory activities such as this UCD Charrette could be far more effective as outreach and recruiting for HCDE than traditional college information sessions. Our long-term goal is to use the UCD Charrette for broad outreach and recruiting in the K-12 environment. We also intend to evaluate this program and practice, seeking funding and grants for research studies.

In last spring's Outreach DRG, we ran a number trials of the UCD Charrette in high school technology classes, using the smart watch as a target application area. This year we are interested in gaining experience with a greater variety of students and schools, including non-STEM classes.

The focus of this DRG will be to organize those efforts. Student teams will interview high school teachers to gather their input, we will revise the charrette protocol based on that user research and the pilot versions, and the teams will then go into high school classrooms and lead students in a UCD Charrette. Teams will assess the results of the workshops and prepare a report on their findings. We will use these findings to further develop the UCD Charrette protocol.

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic HCDE students at all levels (BS to PhD) to help with this project. HCDE DFA students and HCDE 210 alumni are especially welcome to apply. We will be limiting this DRG to a small number of participants. Only students willing to commit to at least 3 credit hours will be considered.


Considering the Possibility of an HCD MOOC: Learning from a MOOC Experience

Run by:  Jennifer Turns, Cindy Atman, Andy Davidson
Format:
  • Take a Coursera course on design (offered 10/21-12/13, the Coursera course website lists time estimate of 5 to 10 hours per week, Statement of Accomplishment from Dr. Ulrich upon completion)
  • Keep a record of your experiences in the course and what your experiences suggest about the possibility of an HCDE-specific MOOC
  • Meet five times with UW students and faculty running the research group (Thursdays, 4:00-5:30, 10/3 and 10/10 devoted to planning and orientation, 10/31 and 11/14 devoted to check-in/status/experiences, 12/12 (or earlier) to share final thoughts)
UW Credits: 2
The concept:
An internationally renowned designer and design researcher (Dr. Karl Ulrich, University of Pennsylvania – more info below) is offering an 8 week Coursera course titled “Design: Creation of Artifacts in Society."  In this research group, you will be expected to sign up for and complete the Coursera course.  You will be asked to keep a record your reactions to the online course (probably in the form of an online journal).  You will also meet with the faculty running the UW research five times, twice prior to the start of the Coursera course, twice during the course, and once at the end of the course. 
The intent of the UW research group is to understand how effective it is to learn design in an online learning environment, and the potential for HCDE to explore a Coursera-like course devoted to human centered design. Our conversations will involve discussion about the following: What did you learn, how did you interact with the other students taking the course from the rest of the world, what were the challenges and benefits, etc.
 
Link to the original Coursera Course: Design: Creation of Artifacts in Society
 
The UW work:
Keep a weekly record of your experiences (e.g., a journal), meet with the faculty running the research group 5times during the quarter
 
The benefits to you:
You will learn about design from a well-know designer who comes from the product design community whose faculty appointment is the business school at the University of Pennsylvania.  This will broaden your exposure to other perspectives on design past the Human-Centered Design perspective.  Upon completion of the course you will also get a Statement of Accomplishment for completing a Coursera course – something that can be useful in your resume as you pursue your career. 
 
The benefits to HCDE:
The HCDE faculty will learn how it might be possible to broaden our course offerings to include resources from the web. We also hope to learn about the potential for an human centered design MOOC. 
 
Product Design and Development, a book by Ulrich and Eppinger is a well known and well respected book in the product development community
 

FizzLab: A Directed Design Group
 
Faculty: Andrew Davidson and Daniela Rosner
 
Website: blogs.uw.edu/fizzlab
 
We live in a world in which our com­mu­ni­ca­tion, enter­tain­ment, and infor­ma­tion needs are migrat­ing to smaller and ever more portable and ubiq­ui­tous devices. It is becom­ing increas­ingly impor­tant for design­ers and engi­neers to be able to cre­ate solu­tions to human-centered prob­lems that inte­grate hard­ware and software.
Phys­i­cal com­put­ing is the blend­ing of hard­ware and soft­ware engi­neer­ing — using micro-controllers, pro­gram­ming, sen­sors, and elec­tronic devices — to build inter­ac­tive sys­tems and envi­ron­ments. The focus of this research group is to pro­vide real-world tools for the HCDE com­mu­nity by design­ing, pro­to­typ­ing, and engi­neer­ing phys­i­cal com­put­ing systems.
 
The group should be thought of as a Directed Design Group, rather than research-oriented. We will make things the way a small design con­sul­tancy oper­ates — in a cre­ative, prag­matic, nim­ble, and col­lab­o­ra­tive team.
 
Each quar­ter a project team will tackle a new design chal­lenge. (Some chal­lenges may span mul­ti­ple quar­ters.) The team will be lim­ited to a small group, the size depend­ing on the topic and scope of cur­rent projects. We’ll need peo­ple with diverse skill sets:
  • Design: UX, IxD, UI
  • Software: Arduino, web, mobile
  • Electronics: digital & analog circuits
  • Communications: documentation, process, coordination
For Winter 2014, we will continue work begun in the fall to create interactive systems for the HCDE Design Lab based on a reclaimed traffic signal transformed by an Arduino web server into a platform for wirelessly-controlled applications. This platform, dubbed “Semaforo,” can support a variety of applications. Currently under development are:
  • PresenDuino: a timing and reminder app for speakers and presenters to get feedback about the progress and pace of their talk.
  • MooDuino: a classroom voting app, allowing an instructor to gather real-time feedback from students in the class.
We will also explore appli­ca­tions of wear­able tech­nol­ogy, using Arduino, Lily­Pad, and FLORA micro-controllers with sewn and printed circuits.
If you are interested in participating, please send email to Andrew Davidson (adavid7@uw.edu) with a copy of your resume/CV and a short statement expressing your qualifications and interests in the group. Preference given to students willing to commit to 3 credit hours.

 
Physical Computing Projects
 
This research group is in support of a new course to be offered this summer—HCDE 498/598: Physical Computing. That course will introduce students to the concepts and practices of engineering and prototyping interactive systems and environments using low-cost microcontrollers (with Arduino and Processing).
 
In this research group, I would like to gather a group of students to help prepare a set of projects to be used as demonstrators in that course—hardware, software, and tutorials. These projects could include:
  • Traffic signal binary counter
  • Bicycle computer
  • Environmental data robot
  • Wireless doorbell system
  • Interactive gown
Students in the research group will design, implement, and document a set of working systems that demonstrate the basic principles of physical computing. The examples should illustrate multiple stages of prototyping techniques, such as schematics, breadboards, and soldered boards. The goal will be to produce functioning prototypes with clear, well-documented tutorials (such as in the Adafruit Learning System) for how to engineer these kinds of systems.
 
For the research group, I would like to assemble an interdisciplinary team of approximately 12 students with interest and experience in the following areas:
  • Computer science (programming for embedded and ubicomp applications)
  • Electronics (designing and building basic digital circuits)
  • Technical communication (writing, photography, video)
  • Teaching and pedagogy (project-based learning)
I am looking for people who care about beautiful software and schematics, take pride in clear communication, and have a passion for helping others learn and make cool stuff.
The group will meet weekly (on Monday afternoon, time TBD) for HCDE 496 (undergraduate) or HCDE 596 (graduate). Credit hours (non-graded) are variable, depending on level of commitment (three hours per week, on average, per credit hour). Preference will be given to qualified HCDE students.