Research

Mark Haselkorn's Research Group Archive

The following research group descriptions are archived because they are no longer offered, the faculty member is on sabbatical, or the group is taking a break. Please contact the faculty member or an advisor to learn more about these groups.


Reading Group: Changing commuter behavior to address traffic congestion

Spring 2018

According to the latest U.S. Census Bureau figures, between July 2015 to July 2016, Seattle was the fastest growing city in the U.S., with a net gain of nearly 21,000 people or 57 per day, on average. With this considerable influx of residents comes an increased volume of vehicular traffic, further exacerbated by a geographically restricted mobility infrastructure.  Rush hour times have become extended, with Seattle ranked fourth among U.S. cities for the worst overall congestion levels.  Seattle commuters spend approximately 40 extra minutes per day (152 hours per year) sitting in traffic congestion.

In this reading seminar-style group, we will explore research that investigates methods of motivating people to change their commuting behavior as a way to reduce congestion levels. The research discussed in class will be used to guide the design of a next generation traffic communication app. Students will be responsible for reading approximately a dozen scholarly articles during the quarter as well as leading the discussion for one or two of these articles. For an example reading, see here. The anticipated workload is 3-5 hours of reading and one hour of in seminar discussion.  Please contact Sonia Savelli (ssavelli@uw.edu), Sarah Yancey (syancey@uw.edu) or Mark Haselkorn (markh@uw.edu) if interested in participating.


Enhancing Community Assessment of Vulnerabilities and Capacities

Winter 2018

This Directed Research Group will engage in research that will be conducted in partnership with the International Federation of Red Cross/Red Crescent Societies (IFRC).  For over two decades, the IFRC has conducted Vulnerabilities and Capacities Assessments (VCAs) to identify community risks and strengths in the planning of programs to enhance community resilience and well-being.  The DRG research will contribute to the design of digital enhancements to the VCA “toolkit” (VCA 2.0) that meet community needs and IFRC missions in the context of humanitarian values and goals.  If you are interested in participating, please contact Mark Haselkorn (markh@uw.edu).


 Qualitative Analysis of Information Sharing Observations collected during a Major Regional Disaster Exercise

In June 2016, the nation’s largest emergency management exercise took place along the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ).  A CSZ earthquake and tsunami is one of the most complex disaster scenarios that emergency management and public safety officials face in the Pacific Northwest.  Exercise activities centered on the states of Washington and Oregon, and involved all levels of government and private entities from USNORTHCOM and FEMA to local firefighters and tribal sheriffs. University of Washington CoSSaR-trained students conducted fieldwork studies of emergency operations and coordination centers (EOC/ECCs) as they activated to coordinate simulated field response operations both within their jurisdictions and also with neighboring communities, state EOCs, FEMA and major military commands.

This Directed Research Group provides training and experience in conducting qualitative analysis of a rich real-world text database.  We are looking for 6 – 8 students to conduct analyses on the large set of observations that were collected during Cascadia Rising. Students will be involved all aspects of the qualitative data analysis process. Our results will be used in future CoSSaR projects aimed at understanding information sharing during emergent events. One weekly meeting and three hours of work per credit hour is required. Minimum 2 credit hours.

If you are interested, please send an email to Mark Haselkorn (markh@uw.edu) or Sonia Savelli (ssavelli@uw.edu) describing your interest in the project, your level in the program (e.g., BS, MS, PhD) and why you want to participate in this research group.


CoSSaR Directed Research Group: Visual analytics and interface design for hyper-dimensional regional disaster resilience data

Building the capacity for regional resilience requires synthesis and understanding of a vast number of economic, social, ecological, and built environment indicators that each vary across space and time. To provide decision support to disaster and crisis stakeholders (e.g., utilities, emergency and business continuity managers) the hyper-dimensionality, complexity and uncertainty of regional resilience must be logically and visually represented in a manageable, comprehendible, and meaningful way. Visualization and the development of geo-visual user interfaces is one of the most under-developed areas of work for guiding restoration, reconstruction and recovery after extreme events, such as a Cascadia earthquake. 

For this DRG, students will help to advance the state of the art of visual analytics and user interface design for regional disaster resilience. A large number of alternative mockup visualization artifacts and user interface designs have been developed as part of a National Science Foundation resilience project on disaster recovery. The will provide students a starting point to develop a user requirements in collaboration with local emergency managers, utilities managers, and other disaster stakeholders, mockup a lightweight interactive user interface (e.g., using javascript and D3), and solicit feedback from potential users of an eventual web-based disaster resilience decision support tool. The DRG will be offered Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters to facilitate multiple iterations of design, development, and user feedback.

If you are interested, please send an email to Scott Miles (milessb@uw.edu) and Mark Haselkorn (markh@uw.edu) describing your interest in the project, your level in the program (e.g., BS, MS, PhD), and why you want to participate in the DRG.


Human-Centered Field Research DRG With Cascadia Rising—the Largest Emergency Management Exercise in the United States

Supported by the Center for Collaborative Systems for Security, Safety and Regional Resilience (CoSSaR)

In three months’ time, the nation’s largest ever emergency management exercise, Cascadia Rising, will take place along the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ). A CSZ earthquake and tsunami would be one of the most complex disaster scenarios that emergency management and public safety officials face in the Pacific Northwest. Exercise activities will center on the States of Washington and Oregon, and involve all levels of government and private entities from USNORTHCOM and FEMA to local firefighters and tribal sheriffs. Emergency Operations and Coordination Centers (EOC/ECCs) at all levels of government and the private sector will activate to coordinate simulated field response operations both within their jurisdictions and also with neighboring communities, state EOCs, FEMA, and major military commands.

This DRG is a one-time opportunity to conduct fieldwork studies of this region-wide effort to implement the National Incident Management System in a post-disaster scenario. Students will observe and record exercise activities being performed by exercise participants across the State. This work will contribute to an existing CoSSaR project to understand information sharing during the exercise, as well provide valuable evaluation for the Washington State Emergency Management Division.


Improving Information, Communication and Coordinate Systems for Emergency Response and Management

Students interested in participating with a research group on "Improving Information, Communication and Coordination Systems (ICCS) for Emergency Response and Management" can contact Mark Haselkorn. This group will analyze and address systemic challenges to effective ICCS in regional safety and security systems, particularly as these challenges impact our management of catastrophic events. ICCS challenges arise during all aspects and stages of evolving emergency efforts, including preparedness, prevention, early warning, rescue, relief, and recovery. Efforts will include interaction with front-line responder organizations (e.g. Coast Guard, humanitarian NGOs) and be linked to both the Pacific Rim Visualization and Analytics Center (PARVAC) and an NSF-sponsored initiative to explore the emerging research frontier of "Humanitarian Service Science and Engineering.

Cognitive Informatics and Decision Making in Health Care

There is critical, nation-wide need to improve health care services while reducing cost. Electronic health records (EHR) and applications of health information technology (HIT) have great potential for this need but there is also strong resistance based on serious obstacles to achieving meaningful use. Conventional levels of software usability, predictability and cost-effectiveness of impact are not sufficient for health-critical and safety-critical applications.
Cognitive support in health informatics will depend on effective integration of information technology with user-centered design techniques, such as usability engineering, contextual research, cognitive systems engineering, task analysis, and several more. How can we apply and integrate these existing design approaches to address these needs? What are the needs for new technology for more powerful design paradigms? How can research influence priorities and strategy for health care informatics to create HIT systems that will be predictably useful, usable and cost-effective?
Topics will include:
  • Need and resistance to EHR adoption
  • The role of information in care processes
  • Major user-centered design approaches
  • The role of user-centered design in achieving process improvements
  • Integrating user-centered with software development
To join this group, you need to contact Keith Butler (Keith.A.Butler@gmail.com) no later than two weeks prior to the start of the quarter.

Human Centered Safety and Security Systems
 
Human Centered Safety and Security Systems: the HCS3 research group works on the design, application and management of visual analytic systems in support of analysts, responders and incident managers in distributed operational environments, collaboratively engaged in awareness, analysis, decision-making and actions that increase the safety and security of their communities and regions.
 

Entertainment trends, learning curves and improving the online game user experience
 
This directed research group will explore one or more issues centered around online game interaction, working with Microsoft's Xbox team to explore current and future user experience. Students will select from a list of research topics provided by XBox, and then will work in teams (and with the Xbox UX Research team) to plan and carry out the research to be done. We will start with a brainstorming/ collaboration session, followed by a literature review around our topic and expand the work from there.
Potential topics/questions to be explored include:
  • As methods of entertainment and media consumption change, what will the future of entertainment look like?
  • What is the efficacy of behavioral versus perceptual methods to improve the user experience?
  • Do younger generations just "get" technology because they've grown up with tech ubiquity or is there an evolving UX design that is universal?
  • What techniques can be developed to police, change or handle inappropriate player behavior in online gaming communities?
  • Through the use of cognitive apprenticeship theory, what is the effectiveness of various teaching techniques in reducing game learning curves?
If interested please email Jonathan Bergeron at jon.j.bergeron [at] gmail.com. Time and location currently TBD.

Improving Information, Communication, and Coordination Systems for Emergency Response and Management
 
Students interested in participating with a research group on "Improving Information, Communication, and Coordination Systems (ICCS) for Emergency Response and Management" can contact Mark Haselkorn. This group will analyze and address systemic challenges to effective ICCS in regional safety and security systems, particularly as these challenges impact our management of catastrophic events. ICCS challenges arise during all aspects and stages of evolving emergency efforts, including preparedness, prevention, early warning, rescue, relief, and recovery. Efforts will include interaction with front-line responder organizations (e.g., Coast Guard, humanitarian NGOs) and be linked to both the Pacific Rim Visualization and Analytics Center (PARVAC) and an NSF-sponsored initiative to explore the emerging research frontier of "Humanitarian Service Science and Engineering."

Cognitive Informatics and Decision Making in Health Care
 
There is critical, nation-wide need to improve health care services while reducing cost. Electronic health records (EHR) and applications of health information technology (HIT) have great potential for this need but there is also strong resistance based on serious obstacles to achieving meaningful use. Conventional levels of software usability, predictability and cost-effectiveness of impact are not sufficient for health-critical and safety-critical applications.
 
Cognitive support in health informatics will depend on effective integration of information technology with user-centered design techniques, such as usability engineering, contextual research, cognitive systems engineering, task analysis, and several more. How can we apply and integrate these existing design approaches to address these needs? What are the needs for new technology for more powerful design paradigms? How can research influence priorities and strategy for health care informatics to create HIT systems that will be predictably useful, usable and cost-effective?
Topics will include:
  • Need and resistance to EHR adoption
  • The role of information in care processes
  • Major user-centered design approaches
  • The role of user-centered design in achieving process improvements
  • Integrating user-centered with software development
To join this group, you need to contact Keith Butler (Keith.A.Butler@gmail.com) no later than two weeks prior to the start of the quarter.

Systems Studies of Humanitarian Response and Logistics
 
This group will be the first of its kind, and will focus on understanding the nature of humanitarian response and logistics work and the elements which contribute to the "success" and "effectiveness" of humanitarian operations. It is intended to be interdisciplinary and welcomes students from human-centered design, logistics, international development and other fields of study. Because of the diverse make-up of students expected, the group will gather to self-define the nature of the work for the quarter. Under the guidance of Robin Mays, PhD student in HCDE with 17 years of rapid response logistics experience, we will identify course goals together (e.g., generate a seminar series, write a literature review, answer a key question, etc.). Students can register for either 496 or 596. Meeting details TBD. Please contact Robin Mays (rmays@uw.edu) with questions.

Enabling Operational Stakeholders to Drive the Design of Information Sharing Solutions
 
Complex activities such as healthcare, humanitarian operations and national security require coordination and information sharing among a diverse and complex community of stakeholders. Major Northwest ports, for example, are home to a multitude of Federal, State, Local, Tribal, International, Public, and Private Entities that require near real-time shared operational information and situational awareness to enable secure, safe, and commercially viable port operations. Port communities struggle to share and safeguard information and maintain situational awareness regarding the ever-changing demands and potential threats within the maritime domain. The resulting degree of incompatibility leads to information gaps and resource inefficiencies, limiting the daily operational effectiveness of major ports such as Puget Sound. This DRG is using field study and formal modeling of work and information flow to help the Northwest maritime security community drive the design of information sharing solutions to their numerous challenges.