Research

Kate Starbird's Research Group Archive

The following research group descriptions are archived because they are no longer offered, the faculty member is on sabbatical, or the group is taking a break. Please contact the faculty member or an advisor to learn more about these groups.


To reply or to quote?: Conversational frames on Twitter

Summer 2019

How we interact with simple design features on online platforms can lead to larger consequences. For example, downstream threads that emerge from replied tweets vs quoted tweets can support different kinds of conversational frames. For investigating this further, we are organizing a Directed Research Group (DRG) 'To reply or to quote?: Conversational frames on Twitter' this summer 2019. There is also a possibility to get involved in a research publication at the end of the DRG.

We are looking for students who:

Are curious about human conversations on social media
Have some experience or want to learn qualitative research methods
Are keen to learn about experimental designs
Want to register for 3-4 summer credits (i.e. 9-12 hours of weekly work)

The group will be facilitated by PhD student Himanshu Zade and advised by Prof. Kate Starbird and Prof. Gary Hsieh. 


HCI, Journalism & Misinformation: Understanding how journalists process, analyze and make sense of data

Spring 2019

In today’s online environment, journalists deal with an evolving landscape of information available through new and social medias, requiring them to process, analyze and visualize large amounts of data. Journalists also need to deal with the presence of media manipulation, the artificial amplification of certain issues in order to get journalists to cover them. In order to help combat these issues, HCI can help study journalists’ work and provide tools and techniques to better enable them to work in this type of environment.

The goals of this DRG are to better understanding what challenges journalists face when using data, what tools have been developed to combat those challenges, and how those tools can be improved upon. We will be examining current practices, conducting interviews, and analyzing the data to formulate the needs of the journalists and designs that could help reach their goals

We are looking for motivated students who are interested in journalism, and addressing the problems of misinformation and disinformation online.  

This will be a 2-credit hour course for HCDE 496 / 596. The group will meet on Tuesday afternoons. The group will be facilitated by PhD students Melinda McClure Haughey and Spencer Williams with guidance from Dr. Kate Starbird. 


Rumor permutations: studying tweets surrounding the Hawaii missile false alarm

Autumn 2018

HCDE Asst. Professor Kate Starbird is seeking a small number of students to join an autumn quarter Directed Research Group (DRG — research for credit) looking at rumor permutations — how rumors permute, branch, and otherwise evolve over the course of their lifetime.

Our case study for this DRG are tweets surrounding the Hawaii missile false alarm: At 8:08 am on January 13, 2018, people in the state of Hawaii received a phone alert warning them of an incoming missile. Although (fortunately) this later proved to be a false alarm, for 37 long minutes residents, visitors to Hawaii, and their families across the country (and worldwide) were trying to make sense of the situation (seeking answers to questions such as: Is there a missile? Several missiles? Is/are it/they nuclear? Where did it come from?), and also sending emotional messages in what it was assumed could be their final ‘words’ on Twitter. Initial data exploration has yielded a rumor pertaining to the relationships between the missile alert and North Korea, and this will be the focus of the research.

We are looking for students with a range of different skill sets and abilities, including data science, and qualitative content analysis. Students with programming experience in Python and MySQL are encouraged to apply. Applicants should note that the research will involve in-depth analysis of tweets that were sent during the 37 minutes when people thought there was an incoming missile, and that as a consequence the content may be emotionally-charged.

This research group will be run by HCDE PhD student Tom Wilson and and supervised by HCDE Professor Kate Starbird. If you are interested, please send an email to tomwi@uw.edu that includes:

  • Current CV;
  • A brief description of why you interested in the group;
  • Any relevant experience;
  • What you feel you can bring to the group;
  • The number of credits you are seeking.

If you have particular research questions you would be interesting in pursuing you can also note them in your email.

Applications will be reviewed on September 19, 2018, and selected students notified by September 21. Meetings will be held weekly on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday and are mandatory for all registered students. The meeting time will be agreed with the selected students. Accepted students should register for 2-3 credits of HCDE 496 / 596 and are expected to conduct 3 hours per week of work outside the classroom for each registered credit.


Designing for reflection on social media activity to support resilience to misinformation

Autumn 2018

This directed research group seeks to understand how we can support student reflection on social media trace data related to news and politics. Reflection can be viewed as a kind of thinking that involves stepping outside of a personal situation to acquire deeper understanding and prepare for future action. Our research begins with the premise that supporting reflection on social media data could promote resilience in today’s information environment. In this DRG, we will explore this possibility through designing, participating in, and evaluating activities that allow us to reflect on our own use of social media. 

Our approach will be based on a combination of the principles of “participatory design” and "research through design". Researchers in this DRG will be designing tools (e.g. digital systems, visual provocations, classroom activities) to help students reflect on their social media usage and how that might intersect with phenomena like online misinformation and disinformation. To inform our brainstorming and design efforts, researchers will be reflecting on their own social media data and maintaining a record of their experiences as we ideate and try out new things. Creativity, critical thinking, an interest in cultivating self-awareness and exploring the nature of information we find problematic will be key components of our work in this DRG. 

This will be a 2-credit hour course for HCDE 496 / 596. The group will meet on Wednesdays from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. The group will be facilitated by PhD candidate Ahmer Arif and Dr. Kate Starbird. If you are interested in registering, please contact Ahmer at ahmer@uw.edu.


Understanding the human impact of hurricanes through social media 

Autumn 2018

HCDE Asst. Professor Kate Starbird is seeking students to join an autumn quarter Directed Research Group (research for credit) looking at the human impact of hurricanes through social media. The goal of this research is to use social media trace data to understand how people adapt to the impacts of hurricanes. This is a mixed methods project — using qualitative and quantitative methods to examine social media posts shared in the aftermath of hurricanes in 2017. We hope to develop new “coding schemes” that identify the different kinds of impacts and adaptations that are visible within social media data as well as new methods for exploring social media data to generate those coding schemes.

We are looking for up to three students to do qualitative analysis and up to three students with some data science experience (Python, R, MySQL or Postgres, etc.) to help with analysis. Students from all departments and all levels are welcome to apply. 

This DRG would be a great fit for students who:

  1. have some interest in analysis of large scale social media data sets and/or want to do research to help people in crisis 
  2. can commit 6-9 hours of work per week (2-3 credit hours) for throughout the quarter

We are particularly interested in (but not limited to) applicants who are fully bilingual and/or culturally fluent in contemporary Puerto Rican culture.

To apply, please send your current resume and a one-page statement about who you are and what you hope to contribute to the project to himanz@uw.edu and ddailey@uw.edu


Understanding conversation strategies on social media: How can we redesign discussion forums?

Winter 2018

We are looking for students to join our winter 2017 quarter Directed Research Group (research for credit) investigating day-to-day conversations on social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook etc. We wish to investigate the following in the context of social media conversations about scientific and political topics:

  • How does individual bias impact these conversations? 
  • What strategies do people use to preserve their self-esteem in such a conversation? 
  • When do people learn from these conversations? How can we acknowledge such informal learning?

In particular, we are interested in identifying opportunities for redesigning interfaces to facilitate online conversations such that people can overcome their preconceived beliefs. We will conduct a literature review (read and summarize papers) about conversations on social media, create physical chat rooms for mediated discussions, and create low fidelity (paper) prototypes to gather some preliminary user data.

What makes you a suitable candidate? 

  • Curiosity about human conversations on social media 
  • Some experience with user research and facilitating user studies
  • Prior knowledge (or some understanding) about experimental design
  • Passion for designing new user interfaces 
  • Looking to register for 2-3 credits (i.e. 6-9 hours of weekly work)

The group will be facilitated by Prof. Kate Starbird and PhD student Himanshu Zade. This will be a great opportunity to learn about research through design and user studies. Meeting time is TBD.


Doubt, Disgust & Disinformation: Designing to Support Emotional Reasoning for Networked Societies

Winter 2018

In this directed research group, we will think critically about 'fake news' and the human instinct to focus more on protecting one's world-view and less on discerning truth from falsehood. We will learn about how this instinct is being exploited in increasingly sophisticated ways by propagators of online misinformation to promote their ideas and commitments. 

We will also explore how cultivating self-awareness around our emotions can help us guide our thinking and behavior around some of these challenges. To do this, we will try out different activities to learn about the challenges we become subject to when we read material we don't agree with. And we will try out activities that might help us step outside of those challenges with an eye toward designing future interventions.

This work will help us understand what we can do in educational and online spaces to address the alarming deterioration of trust and emotional manipulation that is occurring in our public spheres. On a personal level, this work might help you learn about things like: 1) Flavors of online misinformation; and 2) What you can do differently when you engage with information to protect yourself as a citizen.

This will be a 2-credit hour course for HCDE 496 / 596. The group will be facilitated by Ph.D. candidate Ahmer Arif and Dr. Kate Starbird. If you are interested in registering, please contact Ahmer at ahmer@uw.edu.


Understanding the Impact of Hurricane Maria on Puerto Ricans through Social Media (En Español)

Winter 2018

HCDE Asst. Professor Kate Starbird is seeking a few students to join a Winter Quarter Directed Research Group (research for credit) looking at the impact of Hurricane Maria on Puerto Ricans. Particularly, we are looking for students who can help with qualitative analysis of Spanish language social media and/or have contextual knowledge of Puerto Rico. Students from all departments and all levels are welcome to apply. 

If you are ...

fully bilingual and/or culturally fluent in contemporary Puerto Rican culture
have some interest in qualitative analysis of large scale social media data sets and/or want to do research to help people in crisis 
can commit 6 hours of work per week (3 credit hours) for Winter Quarter

please drop a line to ddailey@uw.edu expressing your interest and relevant background. 


2017–2018 DRG on Online Rumoring, Misinformation and Disinformation during Crisis Events

Autumn 2017-Spring 2018

We are exploring several research questions about how rumors, misinformation, and disinformation spread online during crisis events (e.g. natural disasters like Hurricane Harvey and terrorist attacks). In related projects, we are looking at 1) how online rumors change over time; 2) the role that journalists and other “professional” media play in spreading and correcting rumors; 3) how intentional disinformation is spread during crisis events.

We need students with various skill sets, including:

motivated and dedicated qualitative researchers with extensive experience studying and/or using social media (for example: Twitter, Reddit, Snapchat)
students with programmatic data science skills (e.g. Python, MySQL, R, Tableau, Gephi)
students with web scraping skills (e.g. using APIs, creating a web scraper for specific URLs)
students with some experience applying machine learning techniques to big data

Meetings times are TBD. This DRG can be taken for 2-3 credits.

If you are interested in applying to participate in this group, please send an email to kstarbi@uw.edu that includes a resume or CV and a written statement or cover letter describing why you would like to be in the group, what you can offer the group, and what you hope to learn by being a part of the group. If you have specific research questions (ours or your own) that you hope to explore within our project, please describe those.


Sketching a Field Guide to Contemporary Crisis Information Work

Winter 2017

Social media and other information and communication technologies are transforming how people communicate in times of crisis. In this directed research group we will be drawing on recent Human-Computer Interaction literature to make brief sketches (in words and otherwise) of contemporary crisis information workers, what they do, and how they do it. In this way, we will make contemporary scholarship more accessible for practitioners. 

Activities will include doing a close reading of selected academic research (about one reading per week). We will then synthesize what we learn in words and images aimed at practitioners.  

We are looking for students with a range of different skill sets and interests, including crisis informatics; information design; visual communication; and/or bridging the research-practitioner divide. 
Students may use this DRG as an opportunity to learn about contemporary communication in crises and/or develop writing or visual portfolio pieces. 

This research group will be led by PhD Candidate Dharma Dailey, with guidance from Assistant Professor Kate Starbird.

Interested students should send Dharma Dailey a resume/CV along with a statement about why you want to be involved and what you can offer to the team. Please mention both relevant past experience and experience you would like to gain. (ddailey@uw.edu


Tracking Information Flows across Social Media during Disaster Events

Autumn 2016

This research project examines how social media is used during disaster events such as earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, and acts of terrorism. Expanding upon previous work tracking online rumors, this quarter we will be investigating how information moves through and across social media platforms during disaster events. For example, we may track specific stories or pieces of information as they spread on Twitter, Reddit, Facebook and NextDoor.

Activities this quarter will include: literature review, defining research questions, data collection, and exploratory analysis of social media data. We will collate and summarize existing research in the crisis informatics field—especially studies that look at cross-platform use. From there, we will identify open and important research questions for our group to answer. At the same time, we will work to identify and collect data on emerging events—using existing infrastructure where we have it and building new infrastructure (collection software) where we need it. Once we have data and preliminary research questions, we will conduct exploratory analysis to begin to develop methods of answering our research questions.

We are looking for students with a range of different skill sets and abilities, including software development, data science, and qualitative content analysis. Students who are expert users of Twitter, Reddit and/or other relevant social media sites are encouraged to apply, as are students with programming experience in Python and MySQL.

Interested students should send Professor Kate Starbird a resume/CV along with a statement about why you want to be involved and what you can offer to the team. (kstarbi@uw.edu)


Increasing Motivation and Participation of Digital Volunteers/Crisis Mappers
 
During crisis events, thousands and sometimes millions of social media posts are shared by those in the affected area and observers around the world. These data could be very valuable to affected people and emergency responders, but to make them truly useful, we need better mechanisms of filtering, categorizing, and mapping individuals posts. One promising method for processing these data involves crowdsourcing - using volunteers in the crowd to help classify the data.
 
In this project, we will be experimenting with an existing system for categorizing and mapping social media posts that has been deployed during several crisis events. This project is a collaboration with the creators of that system. Using experimental methods, we will be examining the effects of different kinds of feedback on the motivations of volunteer crowd workers. 
 
We are looking for a small number of students to help with A) system design (for each of several experimental conditions); B) software development; C) data analysis and writing a final research paper. Students can take this DRG for 2-4 credits.
 

We will be building on top of the open source microtasking platform, PyBossa. Students should have web development experience and be comfortable using HTML 5; Javascript; JQuery; and Python or Java for the back-end. 


Tracking the Online Spread of Misinformation after Disaster Events

We are examining social media data to better understand how rumors spread after disaster events. Students can see descriptions of this work in past DRG announcements regarding research on the Boston Marathon Bombings. We have created (and continue to develop) an infrastructure to identify emerging crisis events, collect data in real time on those events, find rumors within that data, then "code" and analyze that data. In this large, collaborative project, we are pursuing a diverse set of research questions—e.g. looking at "correction" behaviors, tracking permutations, understanding "sensemaking" behaviors, exploring better models and metaphors to describe rumoring dynamics, etc. Student researchers can contribute by manually coding Twitter data, analyzing that data (qualitatively, quantitatively, and visually), helping to build automatic (machine learning) classifiers to detect misinformation, and writing up reports and papers from those analysis. 

We are looking for enthusiastic and dedicated student-researchers with a range of different skill sets and abilities who are willing to commit at least 9 hours (3 credits) per week to the project. 

Specific skills for new students in Autumn 2015: we are specifically looking for a small number of students with programming/development experience to help develop our social media data collection framework. For this aspect of the project, ideal students would be interested in user experience, social media, and web applications and would have experience with at least 3 of the following: Django, Django Rest Framework, Angular.js, Node.js, D3.js, PubSub patterns in a web context, and familiarity with Rest APIs.


Social Media Use & the 2014 Oso Landslide

Spring quarter 2015, the emCOMP lab will be analyzing social media concerning the the 2014 Oso Landslide, a recent mass fatality event in our region. Students will have the opportunity to work individually on analytical deliverables that may lead to publications in the context of an active collaborative research project. We are looking for one or two students to do a qualitative analysis of a key local information resource that made ample use of social media. We are also looking for one or two students with a bit of programming experience who would like to do some quantitive analysis of social media data. Ideal students will have an interest in this event, qualitative analysis of social media, and be self-motivated. This research group will be co-facilitated by two of Kate Starbird's PhD students user researcher Dharma Dailey and software designer John Robinson. If you are interested email us (ddailey@uw.edu and soco@uw.edu) with a few lines about why your interested and any related experience you have. Previous experience is not required. One weekly meeting and three hours of work per credit hour is required. Minimum 2 credit hours. 


Tracking the Online Spread of Misinformation after Disaster Events

We will be examining social media data to better understand how rumors spread after disaster events. Students can see descriptions of this work in past DRG announcements regarding research on the Boston Marathon Bombings. This Autumn Quarter, we will begin to focus on more recent events, including the bombing of MH17, hurricanes in Hawaii, and violence in Iraq.

We will be doing manual coding of Twitter data, big data analysis (qualitative, quantitative, and visual), and building automatic (machine learning) classifiers to detect misinformation. We're looking for students with a range of different skill sets and abilities, including qualitative coders, data scientists, and programmers with some experience using machine learning algorithms. Students who sign up as qualitative coders will have the opportunity to learn data science techniques (e.g. MongoDB, R, Tableau).

Interested students should send Professor Kate Starbird a resume/CV along with a statement about why you want to be involved and what you can offer to the team. (kstarbi@uw.edu)


Understanding Public Information Needs in Crisis Contexts

When a disaster strikes how will you get the information that you need?
How do emergency professionals reach the public?  
What are the prevailing information needs in a crisis? Are they all met the same way?
There are many challenges to getting information out to the public during a crisis. Crises are inherently unpredictable, often interrupting predetermined strategies for getting information to the public. People are also ever more diverse in terms of the communication tools and platforms that they turn to for information. Given these challenges, the Public Information Needs in Crisis Directed Research Group examines the current strategies employed to get information out during crises from two perspectives: official response operations and observed recent information sharing behaviors among the public.  
In Spring 2014, we'll use document analysis and informal interviews with domain experts to create a basic model of how the work of informing the public during crises is taking place for one locale in the United States. With guidance and support students will be responsible for conducting and documenting a portion of the analysis.
This research group will be run by HCDE PhD student Dharma Dailey and iSchool PhD candidate Beth Patin, and supervised by HCDE Professor Kate Starbird. If you are interested, please send an email to both Dharma (ddailey@uw.edu) and Beth (bethp@uw.edu) with a brief description of why you interested in the group, any relevant experience, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students. Students should register for 2-3 credits and are expected to conduct 3 hours per week of work outside the classroom for each registered credit.

Designing/Developing a Content Curation Web App for Disaster Volunteers (2014)
 
Disaster events have long been catalysts for pro-social behavior, and spontaneous volunteers are known to “converge” onto the scene to help, often by improvising solutions to unexpected conditions and gaps in response efforts. In recent years, people have begun to turn to social media after disaster events for a variety of reasons: locals use social media to seek and share information, emergency responders use these tools to communicate with their constituents, and remote individuals come together on these platforms to offer help of various kinds. Members of this latter group are sometimes referred to as digital volunteers. One of their primary activities involves curating—i.e. filtering, classifying, and synthesizing—the massive amounts of information available on social media during disasters, helping to make this information usable to emergency responders and affected people.
 
The primary focus of this directed research group is to understand the behavior of these digital volunteers and to develop tools that support their activities and goals. In preliminary design work, we have generated design ideas focused around a collaboration curation web application where multiple volunteers can filter and categorize social media posts (tweets, photos).
This is an ongoing project with a small, dedicated group of student-researchers. We have developed preliminary designs based on contextual interviews with several digital volunteers. We are now moving towards developing a web application based on our initial designs. We plan to continue with an iterative design-develop-test cycle where we complete user testing on the application at various stages.
The group has multiple, related goals:
  • To develop and deploy a web application to support the collaborative, connected work of digital volunteers
  • To better understand the phenomenon of digital volunteerism
  • To better understand how groups collaborate and coordinate online 
  • To publish research on digital volunteerism and online collaboration 
We are currently looking for a small number (2-3) of additional team members, primarily to help with the development of functional prototypes from our preliminary designs and to participate in user testing of these prototypes. Students will be able to sign up for 2-3 credits each, depending upon the amount of time they will be able to devote to the project.
Desired Skills:
  • web programming experience (e.g. Javascript, PHP, Ruby on Rails, other)
  • database experience (e.g. MySQL, MongoDB, other NoSQL database)
  • comfortable working as part of a team
If you are interested in applying to join our team, please send an email to Kate Starbird (kstarbi@uw.edu) that includes a statement for why you are interested in working on this project as well as a current CV/resumé. Please highlight your relevant skill sets.

Researching at the Intersection of Social Media and Disasters: Tracing the Spread of Misinformation after the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing (2014)
 
In recent years, disaster events have become catalysts for massive convergence online. After major events like the 2011 Japan Earthquake/Tsunami and Hurricane Sandy, hundreds of thousands—and in some cases millions—of users turn to social media platforms to share information and to collectively make sense of the event. This activity leaves a significant digital record that can be used to study and better understand mass convergence behavior during disasters as well as the role of these new technologies in our lives.
 
This research group will examine Twitter data collected after the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing. We collected over 10 million tweets during a seven day window beginning a few hours after the explosions, and we have gone back and captured all of the links in these tweets as well as the content of the linked-to webpages. As part of an ongoing research effort, we plan to examine this “big data” with a goal of better understanding the spread of misinformation during disasters. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, we will investigate the spread of rumors, the crowd work to identify suspects (that went awry), and several conspiracy theories that propagated through Twitter as well as the surrounding information space of the wider Internet.
 
We are looking for a small group of students with complementary skill sets to continue this research. We are looking for researchers with qualitative skills who will:
  • help develop coding schemes for our analysis
  • read and classify 1000s of tweets and web pages
  • write papers describing our methods, analysis, and findings
We are looking for researchers with quantitative skills who will:
  • make network graphs and other visualizations
  • implement machine learning algorithms to automatically classify tweets and links
  • complete statistical analyses on these data
For this latter group, the following programming skills are recommended:
  • Programming in a scripting language (Python, Ruby or another) 
  • Database programming (MySQL or MongoDB) 
Team members may contribute to either the qualitative or the quantitative/computational side of the project (or both!). Other important skills include: comfort working with a team and great communication skills (writing/presenting).
 
If you are interested in applying to join our team, please send an email to Kate Starbird (kstarbi@uw.edu) that includes a statement for why you are interested in working on this project as well as a current CV/resumé. Please highlight your relevant skill sets.
 

 
Collaborative Crisis Curation: Designing a Social Media Processing Tool for Emergency Managers
 
In this second quarter of a multi-quarter project, we will be continuing our work to design a collaborative platform for emergency managers to help them filter and organize the information streaming in from social media during crisis events. Emergency managers and disaster responders are increasingly turning to social media as a potential information source during disaster events. As they do this, they are faced with new challenges related to processing this flood of information, including finding strategies and tools to deal with the huge volume, noise, lost context, misinformation, etc.
In the Fall Quarter, we identified a research opportunity within this space and developed a research plan for designing a platform to help a virtual group of emergency managers track global events using social media. This quarter, we will continue the human-centered design process, moving from user studies to prototyping of our new tool. Our end-goals for the quarter are to produce a high-fidelity prototype of this tool and to write a paper describing our research and design.
 
Though this research is ongoing, there is some opportunity for a small number of students to begin in the Winter Quarter. We are particularly interesting in students with experience in the human-centered design process and with advanced prototyping skills (web and mobile), and/or students with development skills that can help with the software design and implementation of our tool (web scraping, web development, mobile development, databases, machine learning, etc).
 
If you would like to apply to join the existing group (for 2–3 credit hours of credit/no credit grade of HCDE 496/596), please send an email to Kate Starbird (kstarbi@uw.edu) with a few paragraphs describing why you are interested in the project, your relevant skills, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.
 

Investigating ICT use during Mass Convergence Events
 
This quarter, my directed research group will focus broadly on the use of ICT, including social media and mobile technology, during mass convergence events. Impactful events in the physical world are now triggering digital convergence in the online sphere. We will look at large-scale interaction and collaboration—including behavior that takes place completely online as well as online-offline coordination activity—during events such as natural and man-made disasters, entertainment and sports events, and political protests.
 
Possible events for analysis include the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, the 2011 Joplin Tornado, the first week of the Occupy Wall Street protest, the 2012 Olympics, or future events.
The goal of this group is to bring together students who can approach this domain from different perspectives, pooling a variety of skills (including qualitative, quantitative and computational). You will be encouraged to bring or find your own research questions within this space.
 
Three (broad) areas for research are:
  • Address specific questions about ICT-enabled human behavior during mass participation events, e.g.
  • Design tools for research and/or real-time analysis of social media interaction during these events, e.g.
  • Design tools to support the activities of those participating in these events (on-the-ground participants/fans/etc., emergency responders, organizers, digital volunteers, etc.)
Initially, the group will seek to understand the domain, sharing and discussing readings from research in the areas of crisis informatics, social media dynamics, crowdsourcing, etc. As the quarter progresses, we will work to identify and coalesce around specific research questions. End products may vary, depending upon the trajectory we take—publishing empirical research, designing and developing tools, etc. Long-term goals are to publish resulting work at appropriate conferences.