Research

Mark Zachry's Research Group Archives

The following research group descriptions are archived because they are no longer offered, the faculty member is on sabbatical, or the group is taking a break. Please contact the faculty member or an advisor to learn more about these groups.


Beyond Makerspaces

Summer 2019

Interested in design? hacking? invention? tinkering? Curious about other people who are and the spaces in which they work? Intrigued by alternative modes of production? In recent years, the maker movement has captured the imagination of a broad cross-section of society. Makerspaces of different types have emerged across the Seattle area, including many locations in the heart of the city, in rural settings, and even on the UW campus. Some of these efforts have thrived while others have dissolved or been re-imagined into alternative formations.

This summer DRG will focus on enacting community strategy in the maker movement. Our initial focus will be on sustainability, and our effort this summer will be gathering key experts, industry and technology representatives, and community leaders in Seattle to build relationships, have discussions, and work together toward sustainable solutions. We will work with members of the maker community to bring together technical and sociopolitical perspectives to discover a pathway for fostering sustainable, relational community design in the maker movement.

Our focus will be conducting research (interviews, observations, secondary sources) to design and conduct an event to be held in August. Together, we will use a research-driven approach to design the event, which we now envision as a retreat. Students can expect to learn and practice community strategy, participatory design, and ethnographic methods for user/stakeholder research and engagement. Participants will also have the opportunity to learn and practice collaborative analysis of the data to generate actionable findings, including documentation of the collaborative process itself, and to improve upon the event model for future iterations.

Required Availability

  • Attend our 2-hour meeting each week on Wednesdays from 1 to 3 p.m (starting with the kick-off meeting on June 26). Our initial and final meetings during the summer will be held at UW; our other weekly meetings will be held in downtown Seattle makerspaces.
  • Work 4 hours each week outside of meetings
  • Register for 2 credits for summer quarter of HCDE 496/596

This DRG is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Depending on space availability, preference will be given to students already admitted to an HCDE program. We anticipate that a team of 5-8 students will participate in this DRG.

This DRG will be jointly led by Mark Zachry (University of Washington), Ann Shivers-McNair (University of Arizona), Clarissa San Diego (Founder and CEO, Makerologist) and Rex St. John (Senior Manager, IoT Ecosystem, Arm). Please direct any questions to Mark Zachry (zachry@uw.edu). 


Do conflicts make the Spanish editions of Wikipedia better?

Spring 2019

Co-directed by PhD student Taryn Bipat, and Professors David McDonald and Mark Zachry 

How many times has Wikipedia articles saved you from failing a homework assignment? Those articles would not have been of so much help if it were not for the contributors. These contributors do not always agree with each other. In this DRG, we will address how the conflict arises in the Wikipedia community.

To further understand this challenge, we will explore how editors behave across the various language editions of Wikipedia. While collaboration in the English Wikipedia has been researched extensively, these other language editions remain understudied. The goal of this project is to understand editor behavior in the English and Spanish language edition of Wikipedia.

We are looking for students during Winter quarter to help with a study understanding how conflict occurs between Wikipedia’s editors in the English, French, and Spanish Wikipedias. As part of this research, we will be exploring the literature around editor conflict and multilingual Wikipedia. We will be qualitatively coding editor comments in each language to understand how conflict arises across different language platforms.

We are looking for students, who have experience with or a willingness to learn (1) qualitative coding and (2) user behavior on online collaborative systems (3) Reading comprehension in Spanish is necessary. 


Do conflicts make the French editions of Wikipedia better?

Spring 2019

Co-directed by PhD student Taryn Bipat, and Professors David McDonald and Mark Zachry 

How many times has Wikipedia articles saved you from failing a homework assignment? Those articles would not have been of so much help if it were not for the contributors. These contributors do not always agree with each other. In this DRG, we will address how the conflict arises in the Wikipedia community.

To further understand this challenge, we will explore how editors behave across the various language editions of Wikipedia. While collaboration in the English Wikipedia has been researched extensively, these other language editions remain understudied. The goal of this project is to understand editor behavior in the English and French language edition of Wikipedia.

We are looking for students during Winter quarter to help with a study understanding how conflict occurs between Wikipedia’s editors in the English, French, and Spanish Wikipedias. As part of this research, we will be exploring the literature around editor conflict and multilingual Wikipedia. We will be qualitatively coding editor comments in each language to understand how conflict arises across different language platforms.

We are looking for students, who have experience with or a willingness to learn (1) qualitative coding and (2) user behavior on online collaborative systems (3) Reading comprehension in French is necessary. 


Do conflicts make the English Wikipedia better?

Spring 2019

Co-directed by PhD student Taryn Bipat, and Professors David McDonald and Mark Zachry 

How many times has Wikipedia articles saved you from failing a homework assignment? Those articles would not have been of so much help if it were not for the contributors. These contributors do not always agree with each other. In this DRG, we will address how the conflict arises in the Wikipedia community.

We are looking for students during Winter quarter to help with a study understanding how conflict occurs between Wikipedia’s editors in the English Wikipedia. As part of this research, we will be exploring the literature around editor conflict and multilingual Wikipedia. We will be qualitatively coding editor comments to understand how conflict arises across different language platforms.

We are looking for students, who have experience with or a willingness to learn (1) qualitative coding and (2) user behavior on online collaborative systems. 


Do conflicts make the French, Spanish and English editions of Wikipedia better?

Winter 2019

Co-directed by PhD student Taryn Bipat, and Professors David McDonald and Mark Zachry 

How many times has Wikipedia articles saved you from failing a homework assignment? Those articles would not have been of so much help if it were not for the contributors. These contributors do not always agree with each other. In this DRG, we will address how the conflict arises in the Wikipedia community.

To further understand this challenge, we will explore how editors behave across the various language editions of Wikipedia. While collaboration in the English Wikipedia has been researched extensively, these other language editions remain understudied. The goal of this project is to understand editor behavior in the English, French and Spanish language edition of Wikipedia.

We are looking for students during Winter quarter to help with a study understanding how conflict occurs between Wikipedia’s editors in the English, French, and Spanish Wikipedias. As part of this research, we will be exploring the literature around editor conflict and multilingual Wikipedia. We will be qualitatively coding editor comments in each language to understand how conflict arises across different language platforms.

We are looking for students, who have experience with or a willingness to learn (1) qualitative coding and (2) user behavior on online collaborative systems (3) Reading comprehension in either French or Spanish is necessary. This DRG will be organized into three separate committees for each language.

Being a part of this DRG would require attending a Saturday Wikipedia workshop on January 12 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. During the quarter, the DRG will be held every Wednesday from 4-5 p.m.

This is a 2-credit research group offered to undergraduate (HCDE 496) and graduate (HCDE 596) students. If you are interested in participating, please fill out this google form.


Do conflicts make Wikipedia better?

Spring 2018

How many times has Wikipedia articles saved you from failing a homework assignment?  Those articles would not have been of so much help if it were not for the contributors. These contributors do not always agree with each other. In this DRG, we will address how the conflict arises in the Wikipedia community.

To further understand this challenge, we will explore how editors behave across the various language editions of Wikipedia. The English language Wikipedia is notable for its enormous database but there are also 288 other active language editions. While collaboration in the English Wikipedia has been researched extensively, these other language editions remain understudied. The goal of this project is to understand editor behavior in the English, French and Spanish language edition of Wikipedia.

We are looking for up to 8 students during Spring quarter to help with a study understanding how conflict occurs across Wikipedias. As part of this research, we will be exploring the literature around editor conflict and multilingual Wikipedia. Additionally,  we will replicate prior methods used to understand this platform to check whether prior assumptions still hold true across different language samples and in present day Wikipedia.

We are looking for students, who have experience with or a willingness to learn (1) qualitative coding and (2)user behavior on online collaborative systems. It is not necessary but French and Spanish language skills will be helpful.

This is a 2-credit research group offered to undergraduate (HCDE 496) and graduate (HCDE 596) students. Students will meet for 1 hour every week (Tuesday 4-5pm)  and should commit around 4 hours outside of class time.


Supporting Collaborative Search with ComeTogether

Spring 2018

Led by Mark Zachry, Ray Hong, and Mia Suh

Do you search for places using services like Yelp, Airbnb, or TripAdvisor? Have you ever searched for places to go with your partner, family members, or friends?

This research group will extend our ongoing research into how to improve distributed collaborative searching to support group decision-making. Through previous work, we have designed, developed, and evaluated a new approach called  Collaborative Dynamic Queries (C-DQ). Recently our team created a system called ComeTogether, which allows a group of people to search for recreational locations together. This winter quarter we will design and conduct a deployment study with real users.

Activities for this research group will include working with the research team to develop interview protocols, conduct pre-/post-interviews, analyze data, and potentially prepare a research paper. We are looking for students with prior experiences or interest in qualitative research. We plan to work with 5-6 students who have an interest in the topic and/or have prior experience in conducting interviews and analyzing qualitative data. To enroll, you must be admitted to an HCDE degree program and should have completed some coursework, such as HCDE 313/418/518 or HCDE 417/517.


Working Conditions in the Online Economy

Autumn 2017

Led by Postdoctoral Research Associate, Dr. Toni Ferro

Background

The emergence of the online economy (also known as the gig economy, the platform economy, the on-demand economy, or the peer economy) raises new questions about the working conditions of a variety of workers. The research discussed in this DRG will examine the working conditions of house cleaners working through Handy and/or Taskrabbit. This research has been funded by the National Domestic Workers Alliance.  

Description

The members of this directed research group will have the opportunity to participate in data analysis and discussion of qualitative data. The data will have already been gathered through interviews and focus groups with house cleaners and their advocates. Data analysis will consist of systematic coding using qualitative data analysis tools. Members will also be encouraged to discuss the themes they are finding in the data. This work may lead to a conference poster or paper.

Credits: 2 credits

Requirements

1 weekly meeting on Wednesday, 4:00-5:00pm
5 hrs outside of meeting doing project related work

Qualifications

Members must be upper level undergraduates or graduate students interested in the working conditions of workers in the online economy. To enroll, you must have already completed HCDE 313 or have graduate standing in HCDE.


Picture to Practice: Visualizing Everyday Technology Use

Spring 2017

The focus of this DRG is the development and refinement of a mixed methods approach for understanding technology use in context, combining tool-based visualization, reflection exercises, interviews, and participatory design. Our approach will aim to inform and inspire new possibilities for context-sensitive designs.

In brief
How do you think about your technology use? Given the time needed and the tools required, how would you picture your interactions with technology visually? Ultimately, what stories would your interactions with technology tell about you, and about others? Starting in autumn quarter, this DRG will aim to answer some of these questions, as well as to ask a few new questions along the way.

Who we are
This DRG is offered by Professor Mark Zachry with Michael Gilbert and Elizabeth Churchill, User Experience Research (and former HCDE alum) and Director of User Experience at Google, respectively.

Who we’re looking for
We’re planning to work with a small group of students (6-10) who have proven experience in design (Illustrator, Photoshop, and the like), visualization (Javascript, D3.js, etc), or research techniques (our approach to interactions with technology will be largely qualitative). In the context of this applied research project, DRG participants will have opportunities to develop these skills while applying them.

What we’ll aim to do
During the quarter, we’ll put our own technology use under the microscope. We will aim to start with a brief background in current methodologies to understand technology use, including Experience Sampling Methodology (ESM), diary studies, mobile device app usage analysis, and the ensuing abstractions, representations, and visualizations that result. From there, we will look at our own mobile device usage. Utilizing the methodologies above in a participatory design process, we will aim to better understand and reflect on our interactions with the myriad technologies that surround us on a daily basis.  

Please note that data and conclusions generated by these processes will be shared with Google, who may use it to improve Google's existing products and services or to develop new ones. Ultimately, the research group will aim to have this work culminate in a submission to a relevant research conference in HCI.

If you’re interested…
Please contact Professor Mark Zachry (zachry@uw.edu) with a statement of interest and a list of your qualifications (Adobe design tools, Javascript/D3 production, or research). Please note that you must be a student already accepted into an HCDE program (BS, MS, PhD) to register. All participants will register for 2 or 3 credits, depending on the scope of research they intend to accomplish during the quarter. The DRG will likely be offered for all quarters during the academic year.


Picture to Practice: Visualizing Everyday Technology Use

2016-2017

The focus of this DRG is the development and refinement of a mixed methods approach for understanding technology use in context, combining tool-based visualization, reflection exercises, interviews, and participatory design. Our approach will aim to inform and inspire new possibilities for context-sensitive designs.

In brief
How do you think about your technology use? Given the time needed and the tools required, how would you picture your interactions with technology visually? Ultimately, what stories would your interactions with technology tell about you, and about others? Starting in autumn quarter, this DRG will aim to answer some of these questions, as well as to ask a few new questions along the way.

Who we are
This DRG is offered by Professor Mark Zachry with Michael Gilbert and Elizabeth Churchill, User Experience Research (and former HCDE alum) and Director of User Experience at Google, respectively.

Who we’re looking for
We’re planning to work with a small group of students (6-10) who have proven experience in design (Illustrator, Photoshop, and the like), visualization (Javascript, D3.js, etc), or research techniques (our approach to interactions with technology will be largely qualitative). In the context of this applied research project, DRG participants will have opportunities to develop these skills while applying them.

What we’ll aim to do
During the quarter, we’ll put our own technology use under the microscope. We will aim to start with a brief background in current methodologies to understand technology use, including Experience Sampling Methodology (ESM), diary studies, mobile device app usage analysis, and the ensuing abstractions, representations, and visualizations that result. From there, we will look at our own mobile device usage. Utilizing the methodologies above in a participatory design process, we will aim to better understand and reflect on our interactions with the myriad technologies that surround us on a daily basis.  

Please note that data and conclusions generated by these processes will be shared with Google, who may use it to improve Google's existing products and services or to develop new ones. Ultimately, the research group will aim to have this work culminate in a submission to a relevant research conference in HCI.

If you’re interested…
Please contact Professor Mark Zachry (zachry@uw.edu) with a statement of interest and a list of your qualifications (Adobe design tools, Javascript/D3 production, or research). Please note that you must be a student already accepted into an HCDE program (BS, MS, PhD) to register. All participants will register for 2 or 3 credits, depending on the scope of research they intend to accomplish during the quarter. The DRG will likely be offered for all quarters during the academic year.

If you have any questions about the technology or the general scope of the project, feel free to reach out to Michael Gilbert (mdgilbert@google.com).

Meetings
This DRG will meet on Thursdays, 4-5.


Organizing HCI: Designing a Task Group to Shape Perceptions of Human Computer Interaction

Who We Are Looking For
Do you have a keen interest in Human Computer Interaction (HCI)? A desire to explore the field in a collaborative setting? A desire to share your knowledge with those in the larger community? Have you ever wanted to participate in the design of a tool intended to facilitate the process of online teamwork and distributed coordination?
 
Overview
In spring quarter, the Organizing HCI research group will focus on creating an online project group to both elevate the public’s perception and understanding of human computer interaction and, through that process, to create a tool that helps those same online groups work together.
The primary focus of this research group will be to explore how human computer interaction is represented in one of the largest, most widely recognized and definitive reference sources used by people today – Wikipedia. In a series of task sprints, members of the group will:
  • Develop a strategic campaign for organizing its efforts
  • Research knowledge standards and best practices in the field to contribute to article content
  • Jointly participate in the design of a Chrome plug-in tool to support the group’s efforts by visualizing its collaborative efforts
  • Prepare a research poster and paper describing the DRG’s efforts during the quarter
The goal for the quarter is to engage the research group participants in a design conversation about a newly formed group and its efforts in support of discovering the design requirements for a tool to support such collaborative efforts. Following techniques of participatory design, all research group participants will have opportunities to engage in ideation, sketching, and prototyping activities related to the new tool. Together, we will develop new ideas for how the system design should be implemented to support desirable forms of distributed social interaction focused on advancing knowledge about our field.
 
The Experience
During the quarter, everyone in the Organizing HCI research group will participate in a project to improve HCI-related content in Wikipedia. By reflecting on our own practices in this project, we will concurrently develop the requirements for a system that would ideally support such collaborative online efforts among teams of like-minded but distributed individuals. During the quarter, the group will engage in design discussions about the tool, including conversations about its functionality and interface. Please note that participants in the research will need to have a user account on Wikipedia, but do not need to have prior editing experiences.
 

Consuming Information: Identifying usage patterns associated with free online information resources

The internet contains a wealth of resources that provide high-quality information to the public for free. How do people decide which of these websites to visit when they want to learn something new? This directed research group will focus on developing a survey to find out where learners turn to find high-quality information on the internet, whether they are interested in digging deep into a particular subject, or getting a high level overview. 

Our general research questions include:

  • What free online resources are most popular with people interested in learning particular subjects, and why?
  • How do students use these free online resources to supplement official (university-provided) learning resources?
  • How does the way content is presented in these websites and in search engine queries influence who uses them, what they are used for, and how popular they are?

The research group is structured to run for two quarters. In Winter quarter, group members conducted a literature review and developed a set of survey questions, identified target populations, and piloted the survey. In Spring quarter, students will deploy the survey to the target population, and analyze the results.

The results will be published online and shared with a non-profit foundation that seeks to understand the information-seeking behavior of people who use publicly available online information resources. Students who participate in the research group (either quarter) will be listed as research contributors. 

This group is not currently accepting new participants. If you have any questions, please send an email message to Mark Zachry (zachry@uw.edu). 


Current Research in Social Computing
 
This reading group, designed for doctoral students preparing to conduct research related to social computing, meets weekly to discuss recently published research in the area. Group participants nominate articles for discussion and take turns leading discussions. The group is co-facilitated by Professor Mark Zachry (HCDE) and Professor David McDonald (iSchool).
Group size is limited. If you would like to participate, please contact Mark Zachry (zachry@uw.edu) with a statement about your research interests. The group meets TBD. 

 
Organizing HCI: Taking a User-Centered Design Approach to Improving Small Group Coordination
 
Offered jointly with Professor David McDonald and Michael Gilbert
 
Who We Are Looking For
Do you have a keen interest in the broader issues of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), the desire to explore those issues in a collaborative setting, or the desire to share your knowledge or particular experience with HCI to those in the larger community? Have you ever wanted to participate in the design of a tool intended to facilitate the process of online teamwork and distributed coordination (because, really, who hasn't)? If so, well, you are in luck.
 
Overview
For the autumn quarter, the Organizing HCI research group's focus will be two-fold.  First, the group will continue the design and evaluation of a tool to facilitate small group coordination in online spaces, taking a human-centered approach to the ongoing and iterative development of this tool.  And second, both through the evaluation of this tool and through continued interaction within the online group, we aim to elevate the public's perception and understanding of human computer interaction through contributions to one of the most widely recognized and definitive reference sources used by people today – Wikipedia.  In a series of task sprints, members of the group will:
  • Research knowledge standards and best practices in the field to contribute to article content around the topic of Human Computer Interaction.
  • Create detailed personas outlining the needs and motivations of distributed online team members, as well as use case scenarios in which these personas would be active.
  • Evaluate the current incarnation of our Virtual Team Explorer, a custom tool created to facilitate online group work within the project space,using these scenarios and personas.
  • Prepare a research poster and paper describing the DRG's efforts during the quarter.
The goal for the quarter is to engage the research group participants in a design conversation about the means and mechanisms behind online group work, as well as the utility of the online tools we have created to support such collaborative efforts.  Together, we will develop new ideas for how the system design should be implemented to support desirable forms of distributed social interaction focused on advancing knowledge about our field.
 
The Experience
During the quarter, everyone in the Organizing HCI research group will participate in a project to improve HCI-related content in Wikipedia.  Throughout this process, the group will reflect on the means by which this content is organized and distributed efforts are mediated to inform the personas and scenarios that will structure the evaluation of our Virtual Team Explorer.
 
tl;dr
Be a part of a directed research group that will first, participate in an online WikiProject intended to increase understanding of issues and articles related to Human Computer Interaction, and second, will use the experience from #1 above to inform the evaluation of a tool intended to help ours and other.

 
Haystack Exchange: Designing a Technology to Support New Forms of Social Interaction
 
In spring quarter, the Haystack Exchange research group will focus on iteratively designing a new web-based technology for encouraging transactions of services among groups of people who are socially linked. The goal for the quarter is to engage the research group participants in a design conversation about a newly deployed technology that they will all be using during the quarter. Following techniques of participatory design, all research group participants will have opportunities to engage in ideation, sketching, and prototyping activities related to the new system. Together, we will develop new ideas for how the system design should be developed to support desirable forms of social interaction.
 
Motivation
Recognizing the potential for social media to transform human relationships, this project seeks to explore the characteristics of a system that would help facilitate mutually beneficial transactions among people who are willing to share expertise with each other. Our challenge this spring quarter will be developing our system in such a way that it supports these kinds of transactions in a useful way, reflecting the values of people who want to interact with one another around their different forms of expertise.
 
The Experience
During the quarter, everyone in the research group will use the Haystack Exchange system to trade skills (e.g., editing, tutoring, image production) with others in the research group Periodically during the quarter, the group will engage in design discussions about the system, including conversations about its functionality and interface. At the end of the quarter, all participants will present an alternate system design, repositioning the technology in a new use-case scenario. These designs will be evaluate for appropriateness and technical feasibility.
 

Design and Development for Social Translucence: The Re:Flex Project (2013)
 
Join our research group in spring 2013 to participate in the development of Re:Flex, a social behavior visualization tool attached to Wikipedia. This tool is at an advanced stage of development, and we are preparing to invite developers and UX specialists to participate in the next phase of the research project. Project opportunities in the spring quarter include development of new plug-ins for the tool bar and user experience design. You can learn more about Re:Flex from our recent research poster.
 
Individuals interested in joining the group should have proven experience with some aspect of website or tool design, from conception to completion (a portfolio showing finished products is preferred).
Development Roles
Individual interested in participating in a development role related to the project should have either:
  • At least one year of experience with relevant web technologies (Javascript, jQuery, HTML, CSS), or
  • Experience with interactive visualization of large data sets, using tools like D3, Protovis, etc.
UX/UI Roles
Individuals interested in participating in a ux/ui roles may either be involved in toolbar modeling from conception to high-fidelity prototype (design), or the set up an evaluation test of the toolbar using something like Mechanical Turk (theory/operations). Prior experience in one or the other of these areas is needed.
Individuals should also have experience with frequently used design applications (including Photoshop, inDesign, etc), or experience with prototyping full-featured web applications using tools like Axure, Balsamiq, etc.
 
Meeting Time
The research group will meet Wednesdays, 5–6 pm.
 
Joining the Group
If interested in joining the group, please contact me via email (zachry@uw.edu) with a statement about your interests and your qualifications to participate in a development or ux/ui oriented role. Space in the group is limited so if there are more people interested in participating than we have room to accommodate, I will prioritize based on relevant skill sets.

Current Research in Social Computing (2013)
 
This reading group, designed for doctoral students preparing to conduct research related to social computing, meets weekly to discuss recently published research in the area. Group participants nominate articles for discussion and take turns leading discussions. The group is co-facilitated by Professor Mark Zachry (HCDE) and Professor David McDonald (iSchool).
Group size is limited. If you would like to participate, please contact Mark Zachry (zachry@uw.edu) with a statement about your research interests. Meeting time and location will be announced.

Communicative Practices in Virtual Workspaces (CPVW)
 
The Communicative Practices in Virtual Workspaces research group investigates emergent uses of digital technologies to coordinate work activities. Specifically, the group is concerned with developing knowledge about novel applications and integration of such technologies in the work of organizations—whether those organizations be  corporations, project-based federations of knowledge workers, or affiliated contributors to social media projects. Adopting and extending ideas from computer supported cooperative work, technical communication, human-computer interaction, and related fields, the group uses varied methods to explore communicative practices in virtual workspaces.
Participants will have the opportunity to work on existing projects and to propose work in complementary areas of inquiry. All research will support the group's overarching goals of investigating best practices and designing virtual tools associated with work activities in contemporary organizations. Projects for the group include:
  • Development of techniques for understanding social maneuvers (e.g., identity formation, regulation of behavior) in online interactions
  • Exploration of methods for using computer-use data to create visualizations that support reflective knowledge work
  • Development of tools for sensemaking about online work activities
The group will meet once per week to share results and discuss ongoing projects. The size of the research group is limited. People interested in participating should contact Mark Zachry (zachry [at] u.washington.edu) with a message explaining their interest in the group and indicating what types of activities they might like to work on during the quarter. Students with strong backgrounds in Web 2.0 technologies, visual design, and/or programming are particularly encouraged to apply. Participants in this research group will enroll for 1-3 credits (graded cr./no cr.) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students).

Social Perspectives on the Design of Online Communities
 
Social psychology research and theory can improve our understanding of the adoption and use of social media. This research group will explore the connections researchers have made between social psychology theories of individual behavior and behavior in group settings and the design of social media technologies. The group will consider the impact of social psychological theories such as theories of collective effort, interpersonal bond formation, goal setting, social comparison, persuasion, group identity formation, technology diffusion, and technology acceptance on research methodologies and design considerations of social media technologies. The group will read works by such researchers as Kraut, Resnick, Rogers, and Venkatesh, to identify themes, underlying compatibilities, and tensions among the different authors’ applications of social psychology theory to social media.
Questions to be considered include:
  • In what ways are social psychology studies and theories applicable to individual and group behavior in online social media contexts?
  • What impacts do social psychology theories have on HCI research methodologies and design of systems supporting online communities?
  • How do specific theoretical lenses help reveal (or obscure) invisible work, issues of in/exclusion, and organizational power dynamics?
The research group will meet weekly for seminar-style discussions of assigned readings. Participants will be responsible for reading all assigned materials, analyzing ideas across texts, contributing to an annotated bibliography, and actively participating in discussions. Meetings will be held Mondays, 3:30-4:30. Participants will enroll for 2 credits.
The group is designed for graduate students who have already completed HCDE 501. Group size is limited. To request an add code, please contact Professor Zachry.

Networks and Ecologies
 
Researchers have long conceptualized human interactions with (and through) technology using varied theoretical frameworks to account for the roles and  relationships of people, information, genres, and infrastructures. This research group will explore major contributions in two of the most notable frameworks: networks and ecologies. Examining the work of researchers from Human-Computer Interaction, Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Rhetoric, and Science and Technology Studies, the group will systematically consider the role that different conceptualizations of the human/technology relationship play in driving theory development, empirical research, and design. The group will read works by Nardi, Star, Spinuzzi, and Latour, identifying themes, underlying compatibilities, and tensions among the different authors’ network- and ecology-based theories.
Questions to be considered include:
  • How are human actions constrained or enabled by the technologies they use?
  • What do different understandings of human and technology interactions potentially contribute to designs that would improve computer-mediated collaborations?
  • How do specific theoretical lenses help reveal (or obscure) invisible work, issues of in/exclusion, and organizational power dynamics?
The research group will consist of a small, weekly 2-credit discussion seminar. Participants will be responsible for reading all assigned materials, analyzing ideas across texts, and actively participating in discussions.
The group is designed for graduate students and would be most appropriate for those who have already completed HCDE 501. Group size is limited. Meetings will be held Thursday afternoons. To request an add code, please contact Professor Zachry.