Research

David McDonald's Research Group Archives

The following research group descriptions are archived because they are no longer offered, the faculty member is on sabbatical, or the group is taking a break. Please contact the faculty member or an advisor to learn more about these groups.

 


Winter-Spring 2020

UX Skills + ________ = Leadership 

Faculty Leaders: 

Mike Berg, UX Researcher
David McDonald, HCDE Faculty

Student Coordinators:

Flower (Zhuofan) Hua, UW Student
Britnie Chin, UW Student 

The path to UX Leadership is a mysterious one. There are various resources focused on the characterics of being a leader in the UX field, but there isn’t anything showing the path to leadership and how to get there in the UX community. This DRG will build off of the Pathways: Mapping HCDE career experiences lead by Mike Berg, Paula Chuchro, and David McDonald. During this two quarter DRG we will analyze secondary research, conduct interviews, analyze those interviews for success factors, to understand the meaning of Leadership in UX, and design a UX Leadership Playbook. DRG participants will need to participate in BOTH Winter 2020 and Spring 2020

Students who want to join the DRG should bring the following skills:

Experience conducting literature reviews (secondary research) 
Experience conducting semi-structured interviews 
Interest in creating information visualization in the form of a playbook

Logistics

We are looking for 12-15 students available for two academic quarters, who are available to meet Monday and Wednesday from 5 PM to 6 PM for Winter and Spring Quarters. This DRG is 2 credits per quarter and is open to both Undergraduate and Graduate students. 

Brief Schedule 

2020 Winter Quarter:

The team will explore the meaning of Leadership in UX from secondary research methods (collecting and reading existing literature). There will be weekly hands-on activities to understand research question, develop a study plan, and conduct mock interviews with feedback from professionals in the industry. 

2020 Spring Quarter:

Based on the work from winter quarter, students will follow their study plan to conduct semi-structured interviews with industry leaders. Students will then begin to design a playbook composed of a small set of cases presented through timelines, key choices, types of experiences, that provided important leadership growth and development.


Winter 2020

A Human-Centered Design for Access to Justice

Co-led by: Jane K. Winn (UW Law), Ellen Reed (HCDE), David W. McDonald (HCDE)

This DRG will conduct a human-centered evaluation of the legal technology software A2J Author, develop and perform a usability study, and provide the results of the study directly to the developers of A2J Author. A2J Author is a free platform for legal aid organizations that supports the creation of technological tools that help people with legal problems who cannot afford an attorney. Participants will have the opportunity to create work that can be showcased in their portfolio, utilize a variety of qualitative and quantitative research methods, provide study findings directly to a "client", and contribute to the promotion and development of technology designed to increase access to justice. 


Pathways: Mapping HCDE career experiences

Summer 2019

Directed by Mike Berg and Paula Chuchro

The HCDE Alumni Leadership Board wants to partner with HCDE students to explore the journey that HCDE grads take in their careers. We want to identify the diverse range of careers that HCDE students pursue after graduation as well as key transitional moments in their lifelong careers. We’ll analyze survey data, conduct primary research, compare the HCDE experience with other programs, and develop user personas and a journey map. Research efforts will support the Alumni Leadership Board in planning events and continuing education efforts for HCDE students and Alumni.

Members of the directed research group will work closely with members Alumni Leadership Board, and will have a chance to connect with alums working in a diverse range of companies, roles, and levels. The board will help students make connections with alums and can offer some access to workplace research labs.

Students interested in joining the research group should have an interest in conducting user research with alums working in a wide range of professional roles, as well as working on conceptual models to summarize user research findings. Desired skills include:

  • Experience with executing and presenting secondary research
  • User profiling and persona creation
  • Experience conducting semi-structured interviews
  • Interest in creating information visualizations to summarize research findings

The group will hold weekly meetings on Tuesdays from 4:00 – 5:00 PM, alternating between Seig Hall, Room 129 and a meeting space at the Amazon or Hulu offices downtown Seattle.

HCDE undergraduate or graduate majors will participate in this research group by enrolling for 2–4 credits (graded cr/no cr) in HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). Students are expected to spend, on average, three hours of effort per credit per week (time spent includes the weekly meeting). Interested students should contact Mike Berg.


Do conflicts make the Spanish editions of Wikipedia better?

Spring 2019

Co-directed by PhD student Taryn Bipat, and Professors David McDonald and Mark Zachry 

How many times has Wikipedia articles saved you from failing a homework assignment? Those articles would not have been of so much help if it were not for the contributors. These contributors do not always agree with each other. In this DRG, we will address how the conflict arises in the Wikipedia community.

To further understand this challenge, we will explore how editors behave across the various language editions of Wikipedia. While collaboration in the English Wikipedia has been researched extensively, these other language editions remain understudied. The goal of this project is to understand editor behavior in the English and Spanish language edition of Wikipedia.

We are looking for students during Winter quarter to help with a study understanding how conflict occurs between Wikipedia’s editors in the English, French, and Spanish Wikipedias. As part of this research, we will be exploring the literature around editor conflict and multilingual Wikipedia. We will be qualitatively coding editor comments in each language to understand how conflict arises across different language platforms.

We are looking for students, who have experience with or a willingness to learn (1) qualitative coding and (2) user behavior on online collaborative systems (3) Reading comprehension in Spanish is necessary. 


Do conflicts make the French editions of Wikipedia better?

Spring 2019

Co-directed by PhD student Taryn Bipat, and Professors David McDonald and Mark Zachry 

How many times has Wikipedia articles saved you from failing a homework assignment? Those articles would not have been of so much help if it were not for the contributors. These contributors do not always agree with each other. In this DRG, we will address how the conflict arises in the Wikipedia community.

To further understand this challenge, we will explore how editors behave across the various language editions of Wikipedia. While collaboration in the English Wikipedia has been researched extensively, these other language editions remain understudied. The goal of this project is to understand editor behavior in the English and French language edition of Wikipedia.

We are looking for students during Winter quarter to help with a study understanding how conflict occurs between Wikipedia’s editors in the English, French, and Spanish Wikipedias. As part of this research, we will be exploring the literature around editor conflict and multilingual Wikipedia. We will be qualitatively coding editor comments in each language to understand how conflict arises across different language platforms.

We are looking for students, who have experience with or a willingness to learn (1) qualitative coding and (2) user behavior on online collaborative systems (3) Reading comprehension in French is necessary. 


Do conflicts make the English Wikipedia better?

Spring 2019

Co-directed by PhD student Taryn Bipat, and Professors David McDonald and Mark Zachry 

How many times has Wikipedia articles saved you from failing a homework assignment? Those articles would not have been of so much help if it were not for the contributors. These contributors do not always agree with each other. In this DRG, we will address how the conflict arises in the Wikipedia community.

We are looking for students during Winter quarter to help with a study understanding how conflict occurs between Wikipedia’s editors in the English Wikipedia. As part of this research, we will be exploring the literature around editor conflict and multilingual Wikipedia. We will be qualitatively coding editor comments to understand how conflict arises across different language platforms.

We are looking for students, who have experience with or a willingness to learn (1) qualitative coding and (2) user behavior on online collaborative systems. 


Do conflicts make the French, Spanish and English editions of Wikipedia better?

Winter 2019

Co-directed by PhD student Taryn Bipat, and Professors David McDonald and Mark Zachry 

How many times has Wikipedia articles saved you from failing a homework assignment? Those articles would not have been of so much help if it were not for the contributors. These contributors do not always agree with each other. In this DRG, we will address how the conflict arises in the Wikipedia community.

To further understand this challenge, we will explore how editors behave across the various language editions of Wikipedia. While collaboration in the English Wikipedia has been researched extensively, these other language editions remain understudied. The goal of this project is to understand editor behavior in the English, French and Spanish language edition of Wikipedia.

We are looking for students during Winter quarter to help with a study understanding how conflict occurs between Wikipedia’s editors in the English, French, and Spanish Wikipedias. As part of this research, we will be exploring the literature around editor conflict and multilingual Wikipedia. We will be qualitatively coding editor comments in each language to understand how conflict arises across different language platforms.

We are looking for students, who have experience with or a willingness to learn (1) qualitative coding and (2) user behavior on online collaborative systems (3) Reading comprehension in either French or Spanish is necessary. This DRG will be organized into three separate committees for each language.

Being a part of this DRG would require attending a Saturday Wikipedia workshop on January 12 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. During the quarter, the DRG will be held every Wednesday from 4-5 p.m.

This is a 2-credit research group offered to undergraduate (HCDE 496) and graduate (HCDE 596) students. If you are interested in participating, please fill out this google form.


Developing UX maturity in the corporate world

Autumn 2018 - Winter 2019

This DRG is for students who are interested in how academic research and real-world business do (and don’t) mix. 

UX consulting is a booming business. However, the lack of systematic research on how technology companies learn to adopt UX practices can leave corporate stakeholders skeptical of whether investing in UX is worth it. This DRG provides students with a unique opportunity to work directly with a real-world software company, while also helping to build a body of scientific research on how UX maturity develops in corporate settings. 

As a member of the HCDE Corporate Affiliates Program, nFocus Solutions has offered to serve as a research partner for this DRG, focused on understanding how a medium-sized technology company with a legacy enterprise system works to advance itself through the stages of UX maturity. nFocus Solutions is a SaaS (software-as-a-service) provider of datamanagement, outcome measurement and performance management software to the public sector. They serve a wide range of clients across the public sector, ranging from single nonprofits serving 30 children a day, to entire communities working to improve high school graduation rates, to first responders performing search and rescue missions, to the United States Army. 

The quarter will culminate in a presentation to nFocus Solutions.

Activities 

This DRG will meet from 4 -5:30 p.m. on Thursdays in Fall 2018 (2 credits) and will be led by David McDonald (HCDE), David Ribes (HCDE), and Emily S Lin (nFocus Solutions).

Students will begin the quarter getting oriented to relevant research literature, as well learning about nFocus Solutions and their clients. Over the course of the quarter, students will identify a research contribution they’d like to make (e.g., developing a survey instrument, testing a feedback mechanism), then do field work with nFocus employees to refine their methodology. The final deliverable will be a presentation to nFocus stakeholders.

Recommended Background

This DRG is most suitable for students of all levels (BA, MS, PhD) with an interest in both the research and business sides of user-centered design. Students with a background in organizational studies, social psychology, psychometrics, and/or ethnography are encouraged to apply. We also welcome students experienced with database technologies and/or social service or public sector end-users.

How to Apply

Please submit your current resume/CV and a short statement (2 paragraphs max) explaining why you are interested in this DRG to:

Emily S Lin, elin@nfocus.com, and David McDonald, dwmc@uw.edu.


Do conflicts make Wikipedia better?

Spring 2018

How many times has Wikipedia articles saved you from failing a homework assignment?  Those articles would not have been of so much help if it were not for the contributors. These contributors do not always agree with each other. In this DRG, we will address how the conflict arises in the Wikipedia community.

To further understand this challenge, we will explore how editors behave across the various language editions of Wikipedia. The English language Wikipedia is notable for its enormous database but there are also 288 other active language editions. While collaboration in the English Wikipedia has been researched extensively, these other language editions remain understudied. The goal of this project is to understand editor behavior in the English, French and Spanish language edition of Wikipedia.

We are looking for up to 8 students during Spring quarter to help with a study understanding how conflict occurs across Wikipedias. As part of this research, we will be exploring the literature around editor conflict and multilingual Wikipedia. Additionally,  we will replicate prior methods used to understand this platform to check whether prior assumptions still hold true across different language samples and in present day Wikipedia.

We are looking for students, who have experience with or a willingness to learn (1) qualitative coding and (2)user behavior on online collaborative systems. It is not necessary but French and Spanish language skills will be helpful.

This is a 2-credit research group offered to undergraduate (HCDE 496) and graduate (HCDE 596) students. Students will meet for 1 hour every week (Tuesday 4-5pm)  and should commit around 4 hours outside of class time.


"That's not what I meant!" A Directed Research Group on Voice User Interactions (VUI) 

Summer 2016

During the last few years products have entered the market that feature voice based interaction. Voice based agents like Siri, Cortana, and Alexa promise a seamless style of interaction based on voice command or, very nearly, conversational interaction to understand the goals of the user and act on the user's behalf.

This DRG will focus on one specific device, the Amazon Echo, to explore the limits of voice interaction and design new possible interactions. The DRG will explore how to use the Alexa Skills Kit (ASK) API to expand the capabilities of Alexa to prototype new visions of voice user interactions.

"That's not what I meant!" A Directed Research Group on Voice User Interactions (VUI)