Events

Jennifer Turns

2015 Seminar Series

Reflection and its Relevance to Engineering Education and Human-Centered Design

Reflecting, or exploring the meaning of experiences and the consequences of the meanings for future action, is a form of thinking that warrants greater attention. Reflection can be a means to improve performance, achieve goals, and even grapple with what one scholar (Robert Kegan) calls “the mental demands of modern life.” In this talk, Dr. Turns will discuss efforts to operationalize, understand, and support reflection. As part of this, she will describe the activities of the recently funded Consortium to Promote Reflection in Engineering Education (a consortium of twelve higher education institutions). She will also focus on how reflection connects to human-centered design and HCI, and particularly the design opportunities that are related to reflection. 

2014 Seminar Series

Reflection and its Relevance to Engineering Education and Human Centered Design

Reflecting, or exploring the meaning of experiences and the consequences of the meanings for future action, is a form of thinking that warrants greater attention.  Reflection can be a means to improve performance, achieve goals, and even grapple with what one scholar (Robert Kegan) calls “the mental demands of modern life.” In this talk, Dr. Turns will discuss efforts to operationalize, understand, and support reflection.  As part of this, she will describe the activities of the recently funded Consortium to Promote Reflection in Engineering Education (a consortium of twelve higher education institutions).   She will also focus on how reflection connects to human centered design and HCI, and particularly the design opportunities that are related to reflection. 

2013 Seminar Series

You Read that as an Implication for Action?: Characterizing Implications for Action in Published Research

In her work, Professor Turns and her team are exploring the ways that research connects to practice. In a current thread of this effort, they are exploring ways in which implications for action are represented in research literature. This work is motivated by an increasing urgency to understand how research can be used in professional practice. Journal articles and conference papers (i.e., research literature) are places where researchers articulate ideas about how their research can be used--i.e., the implications of their work. In their current analysis, they are focusing on published research in the domain of engineering education, and specifically on the analysis of sentences (n>4700) from the discussion and conclusion sections of articles (n=59) published in the Journal of Engineering Education between spring 2011 and winter 2013. In Jennifer's talk, she will describe her team's approach for coding this data, findings from the coding of the data, and possible implications of their implications analysis.

About Jennifer Turns

Jennifer Turns is a Professor in the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering and Director of the Laboratory for Human Centered Engineering Education. She researches the intersection of engineering education, cognitive/learning sciences, and user-centered design. Her engineering education work has focused on engineering design learning, knowledge integration, and disciplinary understanding, and has involved the use of a wide variety of research methods including verbal protocol analysis, concept mapping, and ethnography. Turns' ground-breaking research makes her one of the most highly- respected specialists in the engineering education field.