Research

Research Group Archives

The following research group descriptions are archived because they are no longer offered, the faculty member is on sabbatical, or the group is taking a break. Please contact the faculty member or an advisor to learn more about these groups.


Cecilia Aragon
Data Science Ethnography

Big data, the data deluge, the information explosion... there have been many names to describe the overwhelming amount of data that is being generated in just about every scientific domain today. Data science is the term that has emerged to describe the study of the extraction of knowledge from this flood of data, and it can include elements of various fields from computer science to applied mathematics to human centered design and engineering.

However, little is known about the culture and human processes surrounding the emerging practice of data science. A recent five-year, $37.8 million award to UW, UC Berkeley, and NYU from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation seeks to address this gap.

In this research group, we will utilize ethnographic practices including contextual inquiry, interviews, and participant observation to delve more deeply into the culture of data science on the UW campus. We will participate in scientific efforts in astronomy, oceanography, sociology, and other exciting data-driven fields on the cutting edge of science today.

We are looking for students with a background or interest in ethnography, who are each interested in between 2 and 5 credit hours of credit/no credit grade of HCDE 496/596. This group will meet Mondays from 3:30–4:30 p.m. in Sieg Hall, room 420.

If you are interested, please send an email to Cecilia Aragon (aragon@uw.edu) and Brittany Fiore-Gartland (fioreb@uw.edu) with a few paragraphs describing why you are interested in the project, your background in ethnography or other qualitative research, if any, and the number of credits you are seeking. 


Cecilia Aragon
Distributed Mentoring in Online Fanfiction Communities

Are you both a fan and a hacker? Are you interested in studying how people learn from online fandom?

This ongoing research project studies informal learning in online fanfiction communities. We are looking for a small number of experienced programmers interested in fandom to join an existing research group. We have already published one paper on our research (arXiv:1510.01425v2) and are in the process of submitting others.

We suspect that the novel concept of distributed mentoring plays a positive role in fanfiction authors’ development as writers, and this quarter’s project attempts to quantify this effect. We intend to scrape stories, reviews, and associated metadata from fanfiction sites and apply quantitative techniques (machine learning, statistical analysis, data visualization) to investigate the relationship between distributed mentoring and writing quality (e.g., grammar, reading level). Applicants must have spent substantial time outside of class writing scripts to scrape the web and process text, in languages such as python, perl, or bash. No experience in machine learning or visualization is required, although it is a plus.


Cecilia Aragon, Taylor Scott
Qualitative Coding and Analysis of Affect (Emotion) in Text

We are studying creative collaboration in a distributed team of astrophysicists and have collected a large amount of longitudinal data in the form of chat logs. We have been qualitatively analyzing this data to detect and classify emotional content, relate it to events occurring in the group's history, and form a theoretical framework of Distributed Affect. Our initial methods have been successful and promising, and we plan to refine and verify them through further qualitative coding and analysis of the data.

We strongly encourage interested undergraduates to join this group, even if you have little or no experience with qualitative research. This is an excellent opportunity to be introduced to various methods of analyzing text data, and gain insight into the way that such research is carried out.

Participation in this research group should be a good opportunity to:

  • Gain valuable practice in qualitative coding of chat log data
  • Learn more about the application of methods and theoretical perspectives in qualitative data analysis
  • Apply visual analysis as a means of exploring a large data set
  • Discover how these methods can be applied to your own areas of interest and research

Cecilia Aragon
Visualization of Large Text Data Sets

The amount of informal text communication (e.g. chat, texting, microblogs) in the world is increasing exponentially. Submerged within this text data deluge lies a wealth of information that is potentially valuable to businesses, governments, social scientists, and all human communities. In this research group, we will develop text visualizations with a specific focus on visual concordances that can be applied to very large text data sets.

This will be a two-quarter directed research group with the goal of submitting a paper to Vis 2016 in March 2016. During the first quarter, we will sketch, stretch our visual imagination with hands-on design exercises and critiques, and build and test visualization prototypes in javascript and d3. During the second quarter, we will iterate on the research questions, refine our visual prototypes, conduct usability tests of our designs, and write a paper on our results.

I am looking for a relatively small group of people who have taken or are currently taking a class in visualization, who are each interested in between 2 and 5 credit hours of credit/no credit grade in HCDE 496/596. If you are interested, please send an email to Cecilia Aragon (aragon@uw.edu) with a few paragraphs describing why you are interested in the project, your background in visualization or other relevant research, and the number of credits you are seeking. This group will meet on either Monday or Thursday afternoons in Sieg Hall, room 420.


Cecilia Aragon
Analyzing Online Community Data

We have been studying distributed creative collaboration in an online community of children creating programmable media such as games, interactive stories, music and art on a YouTube-like website developed at MIT (scratch.mit.edu). We are interested in analyzing chat log data from the site in order to develop a measure of learning effectiveness in such distributed communities. We will base our analysis on a theoretical framework developed by Turns and an already completed coding taxonomy of a subset of the data developed by Aragon.
Participation in this research group should be a good opportunity to:
  • Experience how theory is used to guide analysis of data
  • Understand how collaborative analysis of data can be organized
  • Learn a new set of theories (externalization of knowledge, creative resonance)
  • Learn about publication venues
Gain insight into what students are thinking about when they engage in educational activities
We are looking for a relatively small group of people who are each
interested in between 2 and 5 credits. The actual organization of the work will be based on the number of people interested. If you are interested, please send an email to both Cecilia Aragon (aragon@uw.edu) and Jennifer Turns (jturns@u.washington.edu) describing your interest in the project and the number of credits you are seeking. Meeting time: Wednesdays from 3 - 5PM in Sieg 427.

Cecilia Aragon
Visualization of Large Text Data Sets

The amount of informal text communication (e.g. chat, texting, microblogs) in the world is increasing exponentially. Submerged within this text data deluge lies a wealth of information that is potentially valuable to businesses, governments, social scientists, and all human communities. In this research group, we will develop text visualizations with a specific focus on visual concordances that can be applied to very large text data sets.

This will be a two-quarter directed research group with the goal of submitting a paper to Vis 2016 in March 2016. During the first quarter, we will sketch, stretch our visual imagination with hands-on design exercises and critiques, and build and test visualization prototypes in javascript and d3. During the second quarter, we will iterate on the research questions, refine our visual prototypes, conduct usability tests of our designs, and write a paper on our results.

I am looking for a relatively small group of people who have taken or are currently taking a class in visualization, who are each interested in between 2 and 5 credit hours of credit/no credit grade in HCDE 496/596. If you are interested, please send an email to Cecilia Aragon (aragon@uw.edu) with a few paragraphs describing why you are interested in the project, your background in visualization or other relevant research, and the number of credits you are seeking. This group will meet on either Monday or Thursday afternoons in Sieg Hall, room 420.


Cecilia Aragon
Understanding and Analyzing Eye Tracking Data

The belief that eyes are the windows to the soul has driven the study of human gaze tracking for over a century. However, it is only recently that technological advances in eye tracking technology have led to dramatic reductions in both the intrusiveness and cost of eye tracking systems. This has led to a recent surge in interest in this technology, which is now widely used in such diverse areas as market research, usability, reading diagnostics, neuroscience, psychology, robotics, games, and more. Even a passing familiarity with eye tracking technology is a highly desirable skill in today’s competitive job market.
This research group will allow you to develop knowledge and familiarity with the theory and history of eye tracking, the process of conducting eye tracking experiments, the use of eye tracking equipment, and the analysis of eye tracking data. The group will produce a set of research posters based on their data analysis with the aim of eventually publishing their work in appropriate conferences.
I am looking for a relatively small group of people who are each interested in between 2 and 5 credits. The actual organization of the work will be based on the number and background of people who sign up. If you are interested, please send an email to Cecilia Aragon (aragon@uw.edu) with a few paragraphs describing why you are interested in the project, your background in eye tracking or other relevant research, if any, and the number of credits you are seeking. This group will meet Wednesdays from 2 - 3:30 in Sieg 427.

Cecilia Aragon
Reading Group: Remixing User Research Methods (Winter 2014)
This reading group will explore user research that adapts and combines methods from both within and beyond HCI. By reading and discussing a broad range of studies demonstrating appropriate, contextualized user research design, students will expand their toolkit of user research approaches. Topics will cover the spectrum from formative user research of values and process to evaluation of technological interventions, but with an emphasis on open-ended, exploratory, and/or qualitative methods.
Facilitated by Katie Kuksenok, Computer Science PhD student (supervised by Cecilia Aragon).
If interested, please email Katie Kuksenok at kuksenok@cs.washington.edu for permission and an add code. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. 1 credit (CR/NC).

Cecilia Aragon
Informal Learning in Online Fan Communities
Meeting time: Tuesdays from 3:30 - 5:00PM. Room: TBD.
The internet has opened up unprecedented opportunities for people of all ages to discover and connect with others who share their interests. Among the most popular interest-based communities are those that bring together fans of various media texts, including movies, TV shows, music bands, novels, and video games. Whether formed around classics like Star Trek, Doctor Who, or Blade Runner, or newer media texts such as Breaking Bad, the Twilight series, or World of Warcraft, these online fan communities make it easier than ever before for people to meet other fans and engage in discussions and creative endeavors around their mutual interests.
Though scholars have begun to explore the learning that takes place in online fandoms, we still lack a complete understanding of the skills youth develop through their fan-based activities; the roles that identity, motivation, and emotion play in young people’s informal learning online; and the novice to expert trajectories made available in different online fan communities. This research group will shed light on each of these areas of inquiry through an ethnographic investigation of online fan communities currently popular among U.S. teens. The group will produce a technical report of this investigation with the aim of publishing the work in appropriate conference proceedings.
We encourage both graduate and undergraduate students to join this group. Qualitative research experience (e.g., contextual analysis, ethnography) is desirable but not required.
We are looking for a relatively small number of people who are each interested in 1–3 credit hours of credit/no credit grade of HCDE 496/596 or INFX 571. If you are interested, please send an email to Cecilia Aragon (aragon@uw.edu) and Katie Davis (kdavis78@uw.edu) with a few paragraphs describing why you are interested in the project, your research background, and the number of credits you are seeking. Please also include a description of any fandoms that you are currently (or have been) involved in and/or would be interested in exploring. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.

Cecilia Aragon
Analyzing Emotional Content of Text-Based Communication
The automated detection and classification of emotion in text-based communication is an open problem, yet recent research has indicated the importance of emotion in collaborative creativity. We have been studying creative collaboration in a distributed team of researchers from an international astrophysics group studying supernovae to learn more about the expansion history of the universe. As a result, we have collected a large amount of longitudinal data in the form of chat logs. We have been exploring methods to analyze this data to detect and classify emotional content, and relate it to events occurring in the group's history.
Analysis of the data has been carried out through both manual and automated coding of the chat logs. The coding scheme we have developed is grounded in this data set, and informed by existing taxonomies of emotion. The group had developed an automated approach to this type of classification, which is now freely available and open-source, that uses the manually coded data as the training set for our classification algorithms. We will continue to build a corpus of coded data, and will be leveraging human interaction to train better automatic emotion classifiers via a ‘human-in-the-loop’ model.
Research conducted by this group has been published in multiple papers in competitive conferences, and all contributing group members are co-authors.
We strongly encourage interested undergraduates to join this group, even if you have little or no experience with this type of research. This is an excellent opportunity to be introduced to the various methods we are using, as well as a chance to gain valuable insight into the way that research is carried out.
We are looking for a relatively small number of people to join the existing group who are each interested in 2–3 credit hours of credit/no credit grade of HCDE 496/596. If you are interested, please send an email to Cecilia Aragon (aragon@uw.edu) with a few paragraphs describing why you are interested in the project, your background in manual or automated coding of text data, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.

Cecilia Aragon
Games for Good: Designing and Building Collaborative Games for Engineering and Science
This research group will explore the use of computer gaming for collaborative science and engineering learning and discovery. Students will be highly hands-on in developing and designing aspects of a game, using the Unity3D game engine to build new levels and environments, constructing narratives, and integrating player feedback as part of an iterative design processes. We are currently designing a futuristic crime scene investigation game that embeds bioinformatics concepts as players work together to save the world from a fictional bioterrorist organization.
Research questions we will explore include:
  • What makes for compelling game mechanics and narrative storytelling?
  • What is the role of social game play and how can game environments support collaboration?
  • How are affect and emotion supported in a game environment to promote greater scientific creativity?
Programming experience or graphic design experience is highly recommended (yet not required if the student is motivated to get up to speed quickly in one of these areas).
If interested please email Daniel Perry at dbperry[at]uw.edu with a two paragraph statement listing your year and department, why you are interested in the research group, and any relevant experience in programming or design.
 

Cecilia Aragon
Analyzing Online Community Data
We have been studying distributed creative collaboration in an online community of children creating programmable media such as games, interactive stories, music and art on a YouTube-like website developed at MIT (scratch.mit.edu). We are interested in analyzing chat log data from the site in order to develop a measure of learning effectiveness in such distributed communities. We will base our analysis on a theoretical framework developed by Turns and an already completed coding taxonomy of a subset of the data developed by Aragon.
Participation in this research group should be a good opportunity to:
  • Experience how theory is used to guide analysis of data
  • Understand how collaborative analysis of data can be organized
  • Learn a new set of theories (externalization of knowledge, creative resonance)
  • Learn about publication venues
Gain insight into what students are thinking about when they engage in educational activities
We are looking for a relatively small group of people who are each
interested in between 2 and 5 credits. The actual organization of the work will be based on the number of people interested. If you are interested, please send an email to both Cecilia Aragon (aragon@uw.edu) and Jennifer Turns (jturns@u.washington.edu) describing your interest in the project and the number of credits you are seeking. Meeting time and location: TBD.

Cecilia Aragon
Social Media Qualitative Analysis: Methods and Practice (SMQA DRG)

Large data sets that reflect activity on Facebook, Twitter, and other social platforms can be vital for investigating human phenomena as well as using social media activity to understand product or policy impact. However, existing HCI research methodologies do not scale in a straightforward way, resulting in ad-hoc data collection and analysis that may or may not achieve desired goals. This research group will develop an integrative methodological framework for analyzing social media data, focusing on text in context of time, network structure, and other associated metadata. In this group, we will have two complementary foci:
  • Methods
    • developing an integrated methodological framework that can be used by researchers in designing and evaluating studies of social media texts
    • relating existing practice with epistemological bases for existing empirical social science methodologies
    • involves understanding related methodological research in HCI and extensive analysis of existing literature on social media data studies
  • Practice
    • identifying and engaging with stakeholders in social media data analysis (including both researchers and, for example, managers who make decisions on the basis of research findings) across both academia and industry
    • contextual inquiry into the practices of researchers and their tool ecosystem
    • involves understanding related CSCW studies of similar populations, designing and distributing surveys, conducting interviews, and observation
In the course of this year-long project, we will spend the fall digging into the methods branch and designing studies for the practice branch, and conduct those studies during the winter and spring. This work will culminate in CSCW and/or CHI submission(s) and any other external deliverables that we determine valuable to relevant stakeholders.
HCDE professional masters and undergraduate students are especially encouraged to apply. Meeting time and location will be determined based on the schedules of group members. If you are interested, please email both Katie Kuksenok kuksenok@cs.uw.edu and Cecilia Aragon aragon@uw.edu with a CV/resume, a paragraph describing the areas you’re particularly excited about, and time constraints that would need to be taken into account in scheduling.

Cecilia Aragon
Understanding and Analyzing Eye Tracking Data
The belief that eyes are the windows to the soul has driven the study of human gaze tracking for over a century. However, it is only recently that technological advances in eye tracking technology have led to dramatic reductions in both the intrusiveness and cost of eye tracking systems. This has led to a recent surge in interest in this technology, which is now widely used in such diverse areas as market research, usability, reading diagnostics, neuroscience, psychology, robotics, games, and more. Even a passing familiarity with eye tracking technology is a highly desirable skill in today's competitive job market.
This research group will allow you to develop knowledge and familiarity with the theory and history of eye tracking, the process of conducting eye tracking experiments, the use of eye tracking equipment, and the analysis of eye tracking data. The group will produce a set of research posters based on their data analysis with the aim of eventually publishing their work in appropriate conferences.
I am looking for a relatively small group of people who are each interested in between 2 and 5 credits. The actual organization of the work will be based on the number and background of people who sign up. If you are interested, please send an email to Cecilia Aragon (aragon@uw.edu) with a few paragraphs describing why you are interested in the project, your background in eye tracking or other relevant research, if any, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meeting time and location: TBD.


Cindy Atman

Spring 2017

Design Learning Pathways in Makerspaces

Led by PhD student Kathryn Shroyer

Background

We have seen the recent emergence and growth of the “Maker Movement” and along with it the growth of “makerspaces”.  While there is no agreed upon definition of a makerspace, they are generally physical spaces that support communities of people who gather together to create, invent, and learn through the accessibility of tools and fabrication resources.  While many of these spaces did not begin with the explicit goal of "education", they have been imported into formal and informal educational institutions around the word (Universities, K-12 school, libraries, and museums) with the promise of expanding informal and hands-on learning experiences.  As a growing number of Universities are designing and implementing makerspaces on their campuses, it is becoming increasingly important to understand how these spaces support student learning, especially with regards to learning design and systems thinking.

Description

This Directed Research Group will begin to look at student learning in makerspaces through participant observation in the Co-Motion makerspace, and other spaces on campus and in the community.  Students will work throughout the quarter to make observations, record field notes, open code, memo, and analyze insights.    We are looking for 4-6 upper level undergraduates or graduate students.  A small amount of reading will be assigned and discussed at the beginning of the quarter, but the bulk of this DRG will consist of weekly observation and analysis of field notes, and a weekly meeting to discuss and share insights.  Meeting time will be determined based on schedules.

This research group will be led by PhD student Kathryn Shroyer, with guidance from Professor Cindy Atman.

Credits: 2 credits

Expectations

1 weekly meeting (2hr) (Time TBD based on schedules)
4 hrs outside of meeting conducting observations and field notes

Qualifications

Looking for upper level undergraduates or grad students interested in learning participant observation techniques and/or interested in informal learning in fabrication spaces.

 

Cindy Atman

“Chance Favors the Prepared Mind”: Mapping Future Discovery to Current Learning
Winter 2017

“Chance favors the prepared mind”
- Louis Pasteur, 1854

“Inspiration is for amateurs — the rest of us just show up and get to work.”
- Chuck Close, 2003

Louis Pasteur famously said, “chance favors the prepared mind.”  This is interpreted to mean that discoveries happen when your brain is able to recognize when an observed circumstance does not conform to learned expectations.  Artist Chuck Close, is saying that creating anything, first and foremost, requires being present. 

In this Directed Research Group students will conduct a set of exercises to…

  1. examine their goals for the future
  2. choose an area that they would like to enable a “future surprise” or “discovery”
  3. and develop a plan to help them be ready to make that discovery
  4. develop skills used in qualitative research such as the ability to deal with ambiguity, uncertainty and situations where constraints are unknown.

Specifically, students will

  • think about what they want to be prepared to do in the future
  • identify a set of 6 or 7 concepts or areas, that they think will enable a future discovery
  • develop a “bookshelf” representation of those concepts (using “My Ideal Bookshelf” as a model https://www.brainpickings.org/2012/11/13/my-ideal-bookshelf-jane-mount-thessaly-la-force/)
  • develop a learning plan to acquire this knowledge
  • create a “memory aid” that will be useful to both learn the concepts, and remember them into the future.

Activities during the quarter will be informed by research on learning, reflection, and appreciation for the adaptive capacity each of us needs as we navigate through the events that will unfold in our lives. 

Throughout the quarter students will discuss their individual responses to each activity and also discuss how each activity contributes to their learning.   

Logistics: This is a 2-credit research group offered to undergraduate HCDE students. Enrollment is limited, so please send me an email (atman@uw.edu) as soon as possible with a few sentences saying why you are interested in this group and how many quarters you have been in the HCDE program.

 

David Farkas and Cindy Atman
Teaching and Learning Engineering Design Reading Seminar
This reading seminar-style research group will focus on research relevant to engineering education, with a focus on design. Examples of topics related to teaching and learning engineering design include the following:
  • undergraduate conceptions of design
  • expertise in design
  • representations of design process
  • approaches to teaching and assessing design
  • consideration of problem context during design
  • sustainability and design
  • theoretical frameworks for engineering education research
The primary activity will be reading conference/journal papers and book excerpts, with the possible addition of viewing online talks. Additional activities may include analysis of qualitative and quantitative data and field-testing educational assessments. For an example reading, see this paper:
C. J. Atman et al. (2007). Engineering Design Processes: A Comparison of Students and Expert Practitioners. Journal of Engineering Education, 96(4). http://jee.org/2007/october/9.pdf
Anticipated weekly workload is 2 hours of reading and 1 hour of in-seminar discussion.
Dr. Cindy Atman will be on leave in 2012 autumn. This research group will resume in 2013 winter. Students who have enrolled in prior quarters are welcome to re-enroll.

Cindy Atman
Designing Your Personal Design Process 
There are many ways to represent design processes (for example, see Dubberly's How do you design?) In this research group we will interact with multiple representations of the design process, and students will develop a representation of their own personal design process.
Main Activities: Students in this group will 1) research and report on prescriptive models of design processes, 2) interact with empirically based representations of design processes, 3) complete a design task, 4) develop their own design process representation, 5) respond to tasks designed to elicit understanding of design context, and 6) reflect on various lenses that can affect design processes (e.g., interdisciplinary perspectives).
What you will get out of this activity: Students who participate in this research group can expect to develop a representation of their own design process. This will be based on the activities described above, the opportunity to reflect on how these activities can be integrated into a personal vision of design, and interactions with peers in the research group. This kind of perspective can be useful while navigating both college and professional experiences. Students will also be co-authors on a technical report that will include copies of pieces of your work through the quarter.
Logistics: This is a 2 credit research group offered to undergraduate and graduate students. Enrollment is limited, so please send an email to Julie Provenson (celtad@uw.edu) as soon as possible with a few sentences saying why you are interested in this group. We will find a time that works for those interested in joining this group. Please state in your email if there are preferred days and times that work for you.

Brock Craft
Smart Cities: A human-centered approach to smart cities and the built environment

Led by:

  • Brock Craft, Senior Lecturer, HCDE
  • Andrew Davidson, Senior Lecturer, HCDE
  • Brian Johnson, Associate Professor, Architecture

We are interested in exploring the design space created by taking a human-centered approach to the coordination of the digital, human and built environment in an urban setting, often referred to as Smart Cities.

This DRG will gather a small group of students together to investigate human-centered issues for highly instrumented and data-rich urban built environments.

We will be exploring questions such as:

  • What do people mean when they talk about Smart Cities?
  • What about Smart Cities is human-centered?
  • What technologies are in use or envisioned in Smart Cities?
  • What differentiates dystopian and utopian views of Smart Cities?
  • What problems should UCD address?
  • What could we address at UW?
  • How could the UW campus figure in this investigation?
  • How could regional urban systems in Seattle be incorporated?
  • How could we explore and prototype ideas to address this topic in future HCDE courses?

We envision establishing this theme of Smart Cities as a topic or thread in future HCDE courses (for the 2016-17 academic year). The purpose of this DRG is to explore the issues and literature related to the theme and develop some ideas for how various courses could embrace this theme in projects or research.

The output of the group's efforts will be:

  • Video reports summarizing the research findings
  • Plans for a possible summer course to continue the work
  • Ideas for tools to use in future prototyping courses
  • Speculation on an Urban Sensing Campus Network

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic students at all levels (BS to PhD) to help with this project. We will be limiting participation to a small number of students. Only those willing to commit to at least 3 credit hours will be considered.

If you are interested in participating, please send email to Andrew Davidson (adavid7@uw.edu) with a copy of your resume/CV and a short statement expressing your relevant experience and why you are interested in this project. The deadline to apply is February 26. You may also contact Brock Craft (bcraft@uw.edu) or Brian Johnson (brj@uw.edu) with questions.

Brock Craft

Designing Interactivity in the Urban Landscape - II

Spring 2017

EXPLORE interactivity with large screen interfaces!
INVESTIGATE sensors and gestural interactions!
DESIGN for a high-profile interactive public display wall!

This is the continuing on going project for interactive displays at the West Campus Utility Plant (WCUP) - a brand new major power plant installation on the UW Campus located on University Way. The facility contains 12 large, street-facing, high-resolution screens. This DRG will explore and implement prototype interactions for this display, enabling passersby to gain an understanding of the University’s commitment to the environment and energy conservation, and enhancing public perception of UW Campus and UW sustainability profile. Team members will investigate possible gestural, sensor-driven interactions and incorporate feeding live data to the responsive displays. 

The WCUP displays are intended to be a permanent installation on the UW campus, and student work will be considered for showcasing at a project launch or in the media.

This project is sponsored by the Office of the UW Architect, This DRG requires dedicated and enthusiastic students at all levels (BS to PhD) to help with the project. We will be limiting participation to a small number of students. Only those willing to commit to at least 3 credit hours will be considered.

Ideal candidates will have some of the following knowledge/skills:

User Research
Contextual inquiry
UI Prototyping
Physical Computing/Electronic​s
HTML+CSS+Javascript
D3
Information Visualization

The project team will meet for 1.5 hours per week (Thursday afternoons, 3:30-5:00) and will run over the 10 week term. It may be extended beyond Spring quarter, depending on the project outcome and success.

Credits: 3

Faculty: Brock Craft, Andy Davidson, Tyler Fox

 

Andrew Davidson

Spring 2017

UCD Charette for K-12 Outreach

Catie Baker, CSE PhD Student
Andrew Davidson, HCDE Faculty

For the past few years, we have been using a design activity known as a charette as a way to introduce students to the user-centered design (UCD) process. In the "UCD Charette," students are given a particular design space to explore (such as user interfaces for a website, mobile app, or a physical device). In a very short period of time (two hours or less), working in small groups, they brainstorm user needs, develop use-case scenarios, and create interaction designs for an application. We have run these participatory workshops with students at various educational levels, from middle school to graduate programs, and with K-12 teachers.

A fast-paced, hands-on activity that gives a good first-hand overview of the entire field, the UCD Charette allows students to experience the thrill of design, while raising questions about its practice, setting the stage for further study. It is adaptable to many different application areas and levels of expertise and interest.

We firmly believe that participatory activities such as this UCD Charette are far more effective as outreach and recruiting for HCDE than traditional college information sessions. Our long-term goal is to use the UCD Charette for broad outreach and recruiting in the K-12 environment. We also intend to evaluate this program and practice, and to expand its reach.

In this DRG, we will continue to broaden our outreach efforts for human centered design in the K-12 environment. UW student teams will facilitate a a UCD Charette in local high school and/or middle school classrooms. Students will plan and prepare the charette activities, and then go into the classroom and lead students in the exercise. Teams will assess the results of the workshops and prepare a report on their findings. We will use these findings to further develop the UCD Charette protocol. 

Additionally, we will be creating a website for the outreach program. The goal of this website is to provide information for local teachers who are interested in having us visit their classroom and resources for anyone who would like to lead their own charettes.   

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic students at all levels (Bachelor to PhD) to help with this project. HCDE DFA students and HCDE 210 alumni are especially welcome to apply. Only students willing to commit to at least 3 credit hours will be considered. 

 

Spring 2017

Designing Interactivity in the Urban Landscape - II

EXPLORE interactivity with large screen interfaces!
INVESTIGATE sensors and gestural interactions!
DESIGN for a high-profile interactive public display wall!

This is the continuing on going project for interactive displays at the West Campus Utility Plant (WCUP) - a brand new major power plant installation on the UW Campus located on University Way. The facility contains 12 large, street-facing, high-resolution screens. This DRG will explore and implement prototype interactions for this display, enabling passersby to gain an understanding of the University’s commitment to the environment and energy conservation, and enhancing public perception of UW Campus and UW sustainability profile. Team members will investigate possible gestural, sensor-driven interactions and incorporate feeding live data to the responsive displays. 

The WCUP displays are intended to be a permanent installation on the UW campus, and student work will be considered for showcasing at a project launch or in the media.

This project is sponsored by the Office of the UW Architect, This DRG requires dedicated and enthusiastic students at all levels (BS to PhD) to help with the project. We will be limiting participation to a small number of students. Only those willing to commit to at least 3 credit hours will be considered.

Ideal candidates will have some of the following knowledge/skills:

User Research
Contextual inquiry
UI Prototyping
Physical Computing/Electronic​s
HTML+CSS+Javascript
D3
Information Visualization

The project team will meet for 1.5 hours per week (Thursday afternoons, 3:30-5:00) and will run over the 10 week term. It may be extended beyond Spring quarter, depending on the project outcome and success.

Credits: 3

Faculty:
Brock Craft
Andy Davidson
Tyler Fox

Human Centered Design Workshop for Alternative Spring Break
Winter 2017

  • Would you like to do something meaningful on your spring break this year?
  • Would you like to play an important role in K-12 outreach for HCDE and the UW?
  • Are you interested in traveling to rural Washington to mentor middle school students?

If so, consider applying for the first Human Centered Design Workshop for Alternative Spring Break!

Alternative Spring Break (ASB) is an outreach program organized by the UW’s Pipeline Project. It provides opportunities for teams of undergraduate students to spend their spring break in a rural or tribal community of Washington State, working with local elementary and middle schools.

This year, in partnership with the Pipeline Project, HCDE is launching its first ASB program, and will send a team of five undergraduates to lead middle school students in a Human Centered Design Workshop. HCDE students will work with the school and community leaders to identify a problem or need that can be addressed by our user-centered design process. Over the course of a week, the middle school students, guided by the HCDE student team, will research the problem, design and prototype a solution, and present their project idea. This workshop will build on HCDE’s existing UCD Charette for K-12 Outreach program.

To prepare for the ASB workshop, HCDE students will participate in a winter quarter DRG. In the DRG, we will develop and pilot the curriculum, learn the essentials of engaging with middle school students in their community, and generally prepare for this outreach adventure.

If you are interested in this exciting opportunity to make a difference in young people’s lives, inspire them about the potential of human centered design and a UW education, and to learn about and engage with communities in rural Washington, consider applying for the DRG.

In addition to registering for this 3-credit DRG, you must also be willing to spend your spring break week on the ASB trip. Housing, transportation, food, and incidental expenses for the trip will be arranged and paid for by the department. The DRG meeting time will accommodate the schedules of students who are accepted to the program.

We are seeking five dedicated and caring students for the workshop. To apply, please fill out this application. The deadline is December 2, 12:00 noon.

Note that the application requires answering a number of essay questions, but you do not have to complete them all in the same session. This is a summary of the questions:

  • Why are you interested in this project? What are your academic and personal goals, and how might ASB help you achieve them?
  • What experiences do you have working with children and/or youth?
  • An important part of Alternative Spring Break is the team. What personal characteristics (talents, skills, knowledge, etc.) do you have that will contribute to the team aspect of ASB?
  • Talk about an experience in which you worked with an individual or group from a different background than your own. What did you learn from the experience?
  • What aspect of human centered design do you find most compelling and why?
  • Is there anything else about you that you'd like to share with us?

We will also require an interview with selected candidates during the week of December 5–9 before offering places in the program.

If you have any questions about the program or the application process, please get in touch with one of us.

Catie Baker, HCDE Outreach RA
Andrew Davidson, HCDE Faculty

 

Measuring Teen Stress with a Social Robot
Winter 2017

During Winter 2017 quarter, we are running an interdisciplinary DRG to explore human-robot interactions among teens in a local high school with our low-fidelity prototype of EMAR. We will observe teens engaging and responding to EMAR’s questions regarding their stress and mood. DRG student teams will analyze and assess these interactions, as well as interview teens about their interactions with EMAR.

Research questions we plan to explore are:

  1. What kinds of robot interactions are appropriate for gauging whether teens feel “heard”?
  2. What kind of social interactions (person to person) result from engaging with EMAR?
  3. What barriers do teams encounter in deploying the EMAR prototypes?

Our team

The team is led by UW Tacoma faculty member Dr. Elin Björling, a stress researcher who studies adolescents. Collaborators include Dr. Emma Rose, UW Tacoma Assistant Professor and UX researcher; and Andrew Davidson, HCDE Senior Lecturer and physical computing specialist.

Background

Adolescents are subject to high levels of stress in their lives, resulting from school, relationships, and family life. Not surprisingly, school stress is most commonly reported as the biggest source of stress for teens. Therefore, accurately measuring teen stress within a student’s school setting can be a valuable way to assess how students are doing and to provide useful feedback for school staff making efforts to reduce student stress.

Social robots are being used to help other populations, such as the elderly and young children. However, there is very little research on either the experience of stress in teens, or the interactions between teens and robots. This presents a unique research opportunity in the field of human-robot interaction (HRI).

Our interdisciplinary team is using participatory, human-centered design to develop a social robot that can measure teen stress in a high school setting. So far, we have developed initial prototypes of a social robot, named EMAR (Ecological Momentary Assessment Robot), and performed preliminary research with teens.

Designing a Social Robot to Assess Teen Stress Using Human-Centered Approach
dub research talk, 8/10/16, by Elin Björling and Emma Rose about the project

 

UCD Charette for K-12 Outreach

Autumn 2016

Charette Peeps

Catie Baker, CSE PhD Student
Andrew Davidson, HCDE Faculty

Autumn 2016 | HCDE 496/596
Meetings: Thursdays, 4:15—5:45, Sieg 128

For the past few years, we have been using a design activity known as a charette as a way to introduce students to the user-centered design (UCD) process. In the "UCD Charette," students are given a particular design space to explore (such as user interfaces for a web site, mobile app, or a physical device). In a very short period of time (two hours or less), working in small groups, they brainstorm user needs, develop use-case scenarios, and create interaction designs for an application. We have run these participatory workshops with students at various educational levels, from middle school to graduate programs, and with K-12 teachers.

A fast-paced, hands-on activity that gives a good first-hand overview of the entire field, the UCD Charette allows students to experience the thrill of design, while raising questions about its practice, setting the stage for further study. It is adaptable to many different application areas and levels of expertise and interest.

We firmly believe that participatory activities such as this UCD Charette are far more effective as outreach and recruiting for HCDE than traditional college information sessions. Our long-term goal is to use the UCD Charette for broad outreach and recruiting in the K-12 environment. We also intend to evaluate this program and practice, and to expand its reach.

In this DRG, we will continue our outreach efforts for human centered design in the K-12 environment. UW student teams will facilitate a a UCD Charette in local high school and/or middle school classrooms. Students will plan and prepare the charette activities, and then go into the classroom and lead students in the exercise. Teams will assess the results of the workshops and prepare a report on their findings. We will use these findings to further develop the UCD Charette protocol.

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic HCDE students at all levels (Bachelor to PhD) to help with this project. HCDE DFA students and HCDE 210 alumni are especially welcome to apply. We will be limiting this DRG to a small number of participants. Only students willing to commit to at least 3 credit hours will be considered.
 

Andrew Davidson

Measuring Teen Stress with a Social Robot
Autumn 2016

Facilitators

Registration UW Seattle: HCDE 496/596
UW Tacoma: TIAS 499
Credits 3, CR/NC
Meetings Wednesday, 4:15—5:45 pm
Locations UW Seattle: Sieg 420
UW Tacoma: [tbd]

Background

Adolescents are subject to high levels of stress in their lives, resulting from school, relationships, and family life. Not surprisingly, school stress is most commonly reported as the biggest source of stress for teens. Therefore, accurately measuring teen stress within a student’s school setting can be a valuable way to assess how students are doing and to provide useful feedback for school staff making efforts to reduce student stress.

Social robots are being used to help other populations, such as the elderly and young children. However, there is very little research on either the experience of stress in teens, or the interactions between teens and robots. This presents a unique research opportunity in the field of human-robot interaction (HRI).

Our interdisciplinary team is using participatory, human-centered design to develop a social robot that can measure teen stress in a high school setting. So far, we have developed initial prototypes of a social robot, named EMAR (Ecological Momentary Assessment Robot), and performed preliminary research with teens.

Our team

The team is led by UW Tacoma faculty member Dr. Elin Björling, a stress researcher who studies adolescents. Collaborators include Dr. Emma Rose, UW Tacoma Assistant Professor and UX researcher; and Andrew Davidson, HCDE Senior Lecturer and physical computing specialist. We are interested in engaging UW students in this project.

During Autumn 2016 quarter, we are offering an interdisciplinary DRG to explore human-robot interactions among teens in a local high school with our low-fidelity prototype of EMAR. We will observe teens engaging and responding to EMAR’s questions regarding their stress and mood. DRG student teams will analyze and assess these interactions, as well as interview teens about their interactions with EMAR. Research questions we plan to explore:

  1. What kinds of robot interactions are appropriate for gauging whether teens feel “heard”?
  2. What kind of social interactions (person to person) result from engaging with EMAR?
  3. What barriers do teams encounter in deploying the EMAR prototypes?

Interested students

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic UW students at all levels (Bachelors to PhD) to help with this project. We will be limiting this DRG to a small number of participants. Students will be expected to register for at least 3 credit hours. This project is open to students from both UW Seattle and UW Tacoma campuses.

The DRG participants will meet weekly, as noted above. Seattle and Tacoma teams will meet on their respective campuses, and we will arrange a video teleconference between them.

You should apply if you are interested in technology, physical computing, psychology, design, working with teens, or robots.

Andrew Davidson
UCD Charrette for K-12 Outreach

Autumn 2015-​Winter 2016

 

Elena Agapie, HCDE PhD Student
with
Andrew Davidson, HCDE Faculty
Emma Rose, UW Tacoma Faculty
Kiley Sobel, HCDE PhD Student

IMG_1393

For the past few years, we have been using a design activity known as a charrette as a way to introduce students to the user-centered design (UCD) process. In the "UCD Charrette," students are given a particular design space to explore (such as user interfaces for a web site, mobile app, or a physical device). In a very short period of time (two hours or less), working in small groups, they brainstorm user needs, develop use-case scenarios, and create interaction designs for an application. We have run these participatory workshops with students at various educational levels, from middle school to graduate programs, and with K-12 teachers.

A fast-paced, hands-on activity that gives a good first-hand overview of the entire field, the UCD Charrette allows students to experience the thrill of design, while raising questions about its practice, setting the stage for further study. It is adaptable to many different application areas and levels of expertise and interest. For a view of a recent version in HCDE 518, User-Centered Design, see this photo album: flic.kr/s/aHsk4yu8Rz.

We firmly believe that participatory activities such as this UCD Charrette could be far more effective as outreach and recruiting for HCDE than traditional college information sessions. Our long-term goal is to use the UCD Charrette for broad outreach and recruiting in the K-12 environment. We also intend to evaluate this program and practice, seeking funding and grants for research studies.

In last spring's Outreach DRG, we ran a number trials of the UCD Charrette in high school technology classes, using the smart watch as a target application area. This year we are interested in gaining experience with a greater variety of students and schools, including non-STEM classes.

The focus of this DRG will be to organize those efforts. Student teams will interview high school teachers to gather their input, we will revise the charrette protocol based on that user research and the pilot versions, and the teams will then go into high school classrooms and lead students in a UCD Charrette. Teams will assess the results of the workshops and prepare a report on their findings. We will use these findings to further develop the UCD Charrette protocol.

We are looking for dedicated and enthusiastic HCDE students at all levels (BS to PhD) to help with this project. HCDE DFA students and HCDE 210 alumni are especially welcome to apply. We will be limiting this DRG to a small number of participants. Only students willing to commit to at least 3 credit hours will be considered.

If you are interested in participating, please send email to Elena Agapie (eagapie@uw.edu) with a copy of your resume/CV and a short statement expressing your experience with the UCD process, high school teaching and mentoring, outreach activities, and why you are interested in this effort.

Andrew Davidson
Considering the Possibility of an HCD MOOC: Learning from a MOOC Experience
Run by:  Jennifer Turns, Cindy Atman, Andy Davidson
Format:
  • Take a Coursera course on design (offered 10/21-12/13, the Coursera course website lists time estimate of 5 to 10 hours per week, Statement of Accomplishment from Dr. Ulrich upon completion)
  • Keep a record of your experiences in the course and what your experiences suggest about the possibility of an HCDE-specific MOOC
  • Meet five times with UW students and faculty running the research group (Thursdays, 4:00-5:30, 10/3 and 10/10 devoted to planning and orientation, 10/31 and 11/14 devoted to check-in/status/experiences, 12/12 (or earlier) to share final thoughts)
UW Credits: 2
The concept:
An internationally renowned designer and design researcher (Dr. Karl Ulrich, University of Pennsylvania – more info below) is offering an 8 week Coursera course titled “Design: Creation of Artifacts in Society."  In this research group, you will be expected to sign up for and complete the Coursera course.  You will be asked to keep a record your reactions to the online course (probably in the form of an online journal).  You will also meet with the faculty running the UW research five times, twice prior to the start of the Coursera course, twice during the course, and once at the end of the course. 
The intent of the UW research group is to understand how effective it is to learn design in an online learning environment, and the potential for HCDE to explore a Coursera-like course devoted to human centered design. Our conversations will involve discussion about the following: What did you learn, how did you interact with the other students taking the course from the rest of the world, what were the challenges and benefits, etc.
Link to the original Coursera Course: Design: Creation of Artifacts in Society
The UW work:
Keep a weekly record of your experiences (e.g., a journal), meet with the faculty running the research group 5times during the quarter
The benefits to you:
You will learn about design from a well-know designer who comes from the product design community whose faculty appointment is the business school at the University of Pennsylvania.  This will broaden your exposure to other perspectives on design past the Human-Centered Design perspective.  Upon completion of the course you will also get a Statement of Accomplishment for completing a Coursera course – something that can be useful in your resume as you pursue your career. 
The benefits to HCDE:
The HCDE faculty will learn how it might be possible to broaden our course offerings to include resources from the web. We also hope to learn about the potential for an human centered design MOOC. 
Product Design and Development, a book by Ulrich and Eppinger is a well known and well respected book in the product development community
 

Andrew Davidson
FizzLab: A Directed Design Group
Faculty: Andrew Davidson and Daniela Rosner
Website: blogs.uw.edu/fizzlab
We live in a world in which our com­mu­ni­ca­tion, enter­tain­ment, and infor­ma­tion needs are migrat­ing to smaller and ever more portable and ubiq­ui­tous devices. It is becom­ing increas­ingly impor­tant for design­ers and engi­neers to be able to cre­ate solu­tions to human-centered prob­lems that inte­grate hard­ware and software.
Phys­i­cal com­put­ing is the blend­ing of hard­ware and soft­ware engi­neer­ing — using micro-controllers, pro­gram­ming, sen­sors, and elec­tronic devices — to build inter­ac­tive sys­tems and envi­ron­ments. The focus of this research group is to pro­vide real-world tools for the HCDE com­mu­nity by design­ing, pro­to­typ­ing, and engi­neer­ing phys­i­cal com­put­ing systems.
The group should be thought of as a Directed Design Group, rather than research-oriented. We will make things the way a small design con­sul­tancy oper­ates — in a cre­ative, prag­matic, nim­ble, and col­lab­o­ra­tive team.
Each quar­ter a project team will tackle a new design chal­lenge. (Some chal­lenges may span mul­ti­ple quar­ters.) The team will be lim­ited to a small group, the size depend­ing on the topic and scope of cur­rent projects. We’ll need peo­ple with diverse skill sets:
  • Design: UX, IxD, UI
  • Software: Arduino, web, mobile
  • Electronics: digital & analog circuits
  • Communications: documentation, process, coordination
For Winter 2014, we will continue work begun in the fall to create interactive systems for the HCDE Design Lab based on a reclaimed traffic signal transformed by an Arduino web server into a platform for wirelessly-controlled applications. This platform, dubbed “Semaforo,” can support a variety of applications. Currently under development are:
  • PresenDuino: a timing and reminder app for speakers and presenters to get feedback about the progress and pace of their talk.
  • MooDuino: a classroom voting app, allowing an instructor to gather real-time feedback from students in the class.
We will also explore appli­ca­tions of wear­able tech­nol­ogy, using Arduino, Lily­Pad, and FLORA micro-controllers with sewn and printed circuits.
If you are interested in participating, please send email to Andrew Davidson (adavid7@uw.edu) with a copy of your resume/CV and a short statement expressing your qualifications and interests in the group. Preference given to students willing to commit to 3 credit hours.

 
Andrew Davidson
Physical Computing Projects
Fall project and organization TBD. For details, email Andy Davidson at adavid7@uw.edu
This research group is in support of a new course to be offered this summer—HCDE 498/598: Physical Computing. That course will introduce students to the concepts and practices of engineering and prototyping interactive systems and environments using low-cost microcontrollers (with Arduino and Processing).
In this research group, I would like to gather a group of students to help prepare a set of projects to be used as demonstrators in that course—hardware, software, and tutorials. These projects could include:
  • Traffic signal binary counter
  • Bicycle computer
  • Environmental data robot
  • Wireless doorbell system
  • Interactive gown
Students in the research group will design, implement, and document a set of working systems that demonstrate the basic principles of physical computing. The examples should illustrate multiple stages of prototyping techniques, such as schematics, breadboards, and soldered boards. The goal will be to produce functioning prototypes with clear, well-documented tutorials (such as in the Adafruit Learning System) for how to engineer these kinds of systems.
For the research group, I would like to assemble an interdisciplinary team of approximately 12 students with interest and experience in the following areas:
  • Computer science (programming for embedded and ubicomp applications)
  • Electronics (designing and building basic digital circuits)
  • Technical communication (writing, photography, video)
  • Teaching and pedagogy (project-based learning)
I am looking for people who care about beautiful software and schematics, take pride in clear communication, and have a passion for helping others learn and make cool stuff.
The group will meet weekly (on Monday afternoon, time TBD) for HCDE 496 (undergraduate) or HCDE 596 (graduate). Credit hours (non-graded) are variable, depending on level of commitment (three hours per week, on average, per credit hour). Preference will be given to qualified HCDE students.
If you are interested in participating in this group, please send an email to Andy Davidson (adavid7@uw.edu) with a short statement of your current student status and major, interests, and relevant skills, and what you think you would contribute to the group.
 

David Farkas

Design Patterns Directed Research Group
Design patterns, in the form of pattern libraries, have become an important means of capturing and sharing design knowledge and experience within a community of practice. Web-based pattern libraries have proliferated in such domains as object-oriented programming, interaction design, and website design. Any design activity can be supported through patterns.

In this one-quarter research group we will learn about design patterns through readings, by examining a variety of pattern libraries, and by carefully analyzing how individual patterns are written and hyperlinked. Then we will write and discuss our own design patterns and design hypothetical pattern libraries. When we encounter unanswered questions, we will try to formulate research questions and possible experiments that might further our understanding of design patterns. Participants in this research group will gain expertise planning, designing, managing, and contributing to a pattern library, will gain practical skills in information design, and will be introduced to the broad issue of knowledge management within organizations.

This research group will meet for 75 minutes at 3:00 on Tuesdays and will communicate between meetings using GoPost. You can register for 2-4 credits of either HCDE 596 (graduate students) or HCDE 496 (undergraduate students). 


David Farkas
Web Design and the Future of Reading
(Fall 2012 & Winter 2013)
This research group is concerned with the ways in which extended text can be displayed on websites for consumption on a variety of digital devices. The goal is to better understand how various designs influence reading habits, and how we can design to encourage extended reading.
This research group will continue through Winter Quarter (2013). This will enable several of the current members to complete their projects. Also, the research group is open to interested students who want to define a small project to carry out during Winter Quarter. I can work with folks to define these projects. To accommodate people with full-time work schedules, this research group will be offered on Thursday evenings from 7:00 to 8:15 pm in Sieg Hall. We will also communicate between meetings using GoPost. You can register for 2–4 credits (graded cr/no cr) in HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). Intermediate-level skills with HTML/CSS are necessary.
If you are interested in this research group, email me at farkas@uw.edu

David Farkas and Cindy Atman
Teaching and Learning Engineering Design Reading Seminar
This reading seminar-style research group will focus on research relevant to engineering education, with a focus on design. Examples of topics related to teaching and learning engineering design include the following:
  • undergraduate conceptions of design
  • expertise in design
  • representations of design process
  • approaches to teaching and assessing design
  • consideration of problem context during design
  • sustainability and design
  • theoretical frameworks for engineering education research
The primary activity will be reading conference/journal papers and book excerpts, with the possible addition of viewing online talks. Additional activities may include analysis of qualitative and quantitative data and field-testing educational assessments. For an example reading, see this paper:
C. J. Atman et al. (2007). Engineering Design Processes: A Comparison of Students and Expert Practitioners. Journal of Engineering Education, 96(4). http://jee.org/2007/october/9.pdf
Anticipated weekly workload is 2 hours of reading and 1 hour of in-seminar discussion.
Dr. Cindy Atman will be on leave in 2012 autumn. This research group will resume in 2013 winter. Students who have enrolled in prior quarters are welcome to re-enroll.

David Farkas
Switchback
We are now seeing fundamental changes in reading behavior and literacy, changes driven by broad trends in education and transformative communication technologies. If, as it appears, digital natives resist extended reading, how will people become fully educated and master complex topics in the 21th century? The SwitchBack Research Group, established during fall quarter 2009, is engaged in the following tasks:
  • Refining the design of the SwitchBack multimodal document, creating small-scale test documents, and conducting usability tests to determine how well SwitchBack documents meet the needs of users.
  • Developing a low-fidelity prototype (using Balsamiq Mockups and other tools) for a potential web-based SwitchBack application consisting of an authoring environment, a presentation environment, and a community participation (social media) environment.
  • Investigating the potential for building the core components of the application.
  • Exploring the ways in which natural language processing/machine reading might ultimately be employed in the authoring of SwitchBack documents
This research group will meet each week for 50 minutes at a time to be determined by group preference. We will keep in touch between meetings via GoPost. You can register for 2-4 credits of either HCDE 596 (graduate students) or HCDE 496 (undergraduate students). If you are interested in information design and would like to learn a new and better way to create documents, email me at farkas@u for more information.

David Farkas
The QuikScan Project
QuikScan is an innovative format for creating better print and online documents. QuikScanning improves both reading comprehension and information access and elicits high levels of user satisfaction. There are many applications for QuikScan, and anyone who learns QuikScan can use it freely for their own purposes.
When we QuikScan a document, we add summaries at strategic locations within the document. Each summary is formatted as a set of numbered list items; the numbers correspond to target numbers in the body of the document where the key ideas in each summary are discussed in detail.
In this research group, we will continue to explore and refine QuikScan in a variety of ways. You can contribute to various aspects of the project. On the technical front, we are looking to improve hyperlinking and pop-up windows and for ways to customize MS Word so that QuikScan summaries and target numbers can be added more easily. On the writing front, we would like more examples of QuikScanned documents, and we would like to refine our guidelines for effective QuikScanning. We are interested in creating QuikScan training materials and field testing these materials within organizations.
We will meet once a week for 50 minutes, probably in the mid or late afternoon on Tuesdays or Thursdays. We will keep in touch between meetings via GoPost. You can register for 2-5 credits of either HCDE 596 (graduate students) or HCDE 496 (undergraduate students). If you are interested in information design and would like to learn a new and better way to create documents, email me at farkas@u.

Tyler Fox

Designing Interactivity in the Urban Landscape - II

Spring 2017
 

EXPLORE interactivity with large screen interfaces!
INVESTIGATE sensors and gestural interactions!
DESIGN for a high-profile interactive public display wall!

This is the continuing on going project for interactive displays at the West Campus Utility Plant (WCUP) - a brand new major power plant installation on the UW Campus located on University Way. The facility contains 12 large, street-facing, high-resolution screens. This DRG will explore and implement prototype interactions for this display, enabling passersby to gain an understanding of the University’s commitment to the environment and energy conservation, and enhancing public perception of UW Campus and UW sustainability profile. Team members will investigate possible gestural, sensor-driven interactions and incorporate feeding live data to the responsive displays. 

The WCUP displays are intended to be a permanent installation on the UW campus, and student work will be considered for showcasing at a project launch or in the media.

This project is sponsored by the Office of the UW Architect, This DRG requires dedicated and enthusiastic students at all levels (BS to PhD) to help with the project. We will be limiting participation to a small number of students. Only those willing to commit to at least 3 credit hours will be considered.

Ideal candidates will have some of the following knowledge/skills:

User Research
Contextual inquiry
UI Prototyping
Physical Computing/Electronic​s
HTML+CSS+Javascript
D3
Information Visualization

The project team will meet for 1.5 hours per week (Thursday afternoons, 3:30-5:00) and will run over the 10 week term. It may be extended beyond Spring quarter, depending on the project outcome and success.

Credits: 3

Faculty: 
Brock Craft
Andy Davidson
Tyler Fox


Mark Haselkorn

 Qualitative Analysis of Information Sharing Observations collected during a Major Regional Disaster Exercise

In June 2016, the nation’s largest emergency management exercise took place along the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ).  A CSZ earthquake and tsunami is one of the most complex disaster scenarios that emergency management and public safety officials face in the Pacific Northwest.  Exercise activities centered on the states of Washington and Oregon, and involved all levels of government and private entities from USNORTHCOM and FEMA to local firefighters and tribal sheriffs. University of Washington CoSSaR-trained students conducted fieldwork studies of emergency operations and coordination centers (EOC/ECCs) as they activated to coordinate simulated field response operations both within their jurisdictions and also with neighboring communities, state EOCs, FEMA and major military commands.

This Directed Research Group provides training and experience in conducting qualitative analysis of a rich real-world text database.  We are looking for 6 – 8 students to conduct analyses on the large set of observations that were collected during Cascadia Rising. Students will be involved all aspects of the qualitative data analysis process. Our results will be used in future CoSSaR projects aimed at understanding information sharing during emergent events. One weekly meeting and three hours of work per credit hour is required. Minimum 2 credit hours.

If you are interested, please send an email to Mark Haselkorn (markh@uw.edu) or Sonia Savelli (ssavelli@uw.edu) describing your interest in the project, your level in the program (e.g., BS, MS, PhD) and why you want to participate in this research group.

Mark Haselkorn

CoSSaR Directed Research Group: Visual analytics and interface design for hyper-dimensional regional disaster resilience data

Building the capacity for regional resilience requires synthesis and understanding of a vast number of economic, social, ecological, and built environment indicators that each vary across space and time. To provide decision support to disaster and crisis stakeholders (e.g., utilities, emergency and business continuity managers) the hyper-dimensionality, complexity and uncertainty of regional resilience must be logically and visually represented in a manageable, comprehendible, and meaningful way. Visualization and the development of geo-visual user interfaces is one of the most under-developed areas of work for guiding restoration, reconstruction and recovery after extreme events, such as a Cascadia earthquake. 

For this DRG, students will help to advance the state of the art of visual analytics and user interface design for regional disaster resilience. A large number of alternative mockup visualization artifacts and user interface designs have been developed as part of a National Science Foundation resilience project on disaster recovery. The will provide students a starting point to develop a user requirements in collaboration with local emergency managers, utilities managers, and other disaster stakeholders, mockup a lightweight interactive user interface (e.g., using javascript and D3), and solicit feedback from potential users of an eventual web-based disaster resilience decision support tool. The DRG will be offered Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters to facilitate multiple iterations of design, development, and user feedback.

If you are interested, please send an email to Scott Miles (milessb@uw.edu) and Mark Haselkorn (markh@uw.edu) describing your interest in the project, your level in the program (e.g., BS, MS, PhD), and why you want to participate in the DRG.


Mark Haslkorn, Brian Zito
Human-Centered Field Research DRG With Cascadia Rising—the Largest Emergency Management Exercise in the United States

Supported by the Center for Collaborative Systems for Security, Safety and Regional Resilience (CoSSaR)

In three months’ time, the nation’s largest ever emergency management exercise, Cascadia Rising, will take place along the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ). A CSZ earthquake and tsunami would be one of the most complex disaster scenarios that emergency management and public safety officials face in the Pacific Northwest. Exercise activities will center on the States of Washington and Oregon, and involve all levels of government and private entities from USNORTHCOM and FEMA to local firefighters and tribal sheriffs. Emergency Operations and Coordination Centers (EOC/ECCs) at all levels of government and the private sector will activate to coordinate simulated field response operations both within their jurisdictions and also with neighboring communities, state EOCs, FEMA, and major military commands.

This DRG is a one-time opportunity to conduct fieldwork studies of this region-wide effort to implement the National Incident Management System in a post-disaster scenario. Students will observe and record exercise activities being performed by exercise participants across the State. This work will contribute to an existing CoSSaR project to understand information sharing during the exercise, as well provide valuable evaluation for the Washington State Emergency Management Division.


Mark Haselkorn, Scott Miles
CoSSaR Directed Research Group: Visual analytics and interface design for hyper-dimensional regional disaster resilience data

Building the capacity for regional resilience requires synthesis and understanding of a vast number of economic, social, ecological, and built environment indicators that each vary across space and time. To provide decision support to disaster and crisis stakeholders (e.g., utilities, emergency and business continuity managers) the hyper-dimensionality, complexity and uncertainty of regional resilience must be logically and visually represented in a manageable, comprehendible, and meaningful way. Visualization and the development of geo-visual user interfaces is one of the most under-developed areas of work for guiding restoration, reconstruction and recovery after extreme events, such as a Cascadia earthquake.

For this DRG, students will help to advance the state of the art of visual analytics and user interface design for regional disaster resilience. Students will continue the design process started in Fall 2015 to understand user and application needs in collaboration with local emergency managers, utilities managers, and other disaster stakeholders. Students will complete stakeholder interviews in Spring 2016 and code the resulting data This evidence will inform the design and development of disaster recovery geovisual interface alternatives. Time depending, students will solicit feedback from study participants on their mockups/prototypes developed as part of the DRG. Students will assist in outlining a conference paper describing the outcomes of the user research.

If you are interested in participating, contact Scott Miles at milessb@uw.edu.

 


Mark Haselkorn
Improving Information, Communication and Coordinate Systems for Emergency Response and Management

Students interested in participating with a research group on "Improving Information, Communication and Coordination Systems (ICCS) for Emergency Response and Management" can contact Mark Haselkorn. This group will analyze and address systemic challenges to effective ICCS in regional safety and security systems, particularly as these challenges impact our management of catastrophic events. ICCS challenges arise during all aspects and stages of evolving emergency efforts, including preparedness, prevention, early warning, rescue, relief, and recovery. Efforts will include interaction with front-line responder organizations (e.g. Coast Guard, humanitarian NGOs) and be linked to both the Pacific Rim Visualization and Analytics Center (PARVAC) and an NSF-sponsored initiative to explore the emerging research frontier of "Humanitarian Service Science and Engineering.

Mark Haselkorn
Cognitive Informatics and Decision Making in Health Care
There is critical, nation-wide need to improve health care services while reducing cost. Electronic health records (EHR) and applications of health information technology (HIT) have great potential for this need but there is also strong resistance based on serious obstacles to achieving meaningful use. Conventional levels of software usability, predictability and cost-effectiveness of impact are not sufficient for health-critical and safety-critical applications.
Cognitive support in health informatics will depend on effective integration of information technology with user-centered design techniques, such as usability engineering, contextual research, cognitive systems engineering, task analysis, and several more. How can we apply and integrate these existing design approaches to address these needs? What are the needs for new technology for more powerful design paradigms? How can research influence priorities and strategy for health care informatics to create HIT systems that will be predictably useful, usable and cost-effective?
Topics will include:
  • Need and resistance to EHR adoption
  • The role of information in care processes
  • Major user-centered design approaches
  • The role of user-centered design in achieving process improvements
  • Integrating user-centered with software development
To join this group, you need to contact Keith Butler (Keith.A.Butler@gmail.com) no later than two weeks prior to the start of the quarter.

Mark Haselkorn
Human Centered Safety and Security Systems
Human Centered Safety and Security Systems: the HCS3 research group works on the design, application and management of visual analytic systems in support of analysts, responders and incident managers in distributed operational environments, collaboratively engaged in awareness, analysis, decision-making and actions that increase the safety and security of their communities and regions.
 

Mark Haselkorn
Entertainment trends, learning curves and improving the online game user experience
This directed research group will explore one or more issues centered around online game interaction, working with Microsoft's Xbox team to explore current and future user experience. Students will select from a list of research topics provided by XBox, and then will work in teams (and with the Xbox UX Research team) to plan and carry out the research to be done. We will start with a brainstorming/ collaboration session, followed by a literature review around our topic and expand the work from there.
Potential topics/questions to be explored include:
  • As methods of entertainment and media consumption change, what will the future of entertainment look like?
  • What is the efficacy of behavioral versus perceptual methods to improve the user experience?
  • Do younger generations just "get" technology because they've grown up with tech ubiquity or is there an evolving UX design that is universal?
  • What techniques can be developed to police, change or handle inappropriate player behavior in online gaming communities?
  • Through the use of cognitive apprenticeship theory, what is the effectiveness of various teaching techniques in reducing game learning curves?
If interested please email Jonathan Bergeron at jon.j.bergeron [at] gmail.com. Time and location currently TBD.

Mark Haselkorn
Improving Information, Communication, and Coordination Systems for Emergency Response and Management
Students interested in participating with a research group on "Improving Information, Communication, and Coordination Systems (ICCS) for Emergency Response and Management" can contact Mark Haselkorn. This group will analyze and address systemic challenges to effective ICCS in regional safety and security systems, particularly as these challenges impact our management of catastrophic events. ICCS challenges arise during all aspects and stages of evolving emergency efforts, including preparedness, prevention, early warning, rescue, relief, and recovery. Efforts will include interaction with front-line responder organizations (e.g., Coast Guard, humanitarian NGOs) and be linked to both the Pacific Rim Visualization and Analytics Center (PARVAC) and an NSF-sponsored initiative to explore the emerging research frontier of "Humanitarian Service Science and Engineering."

Mark Haselkorn
Cognitive Informatics and Decision Making in Health Care
There is critical, nation-wide need to improve health care services while reducing cost. Electronic health records (EHR) and applications of health information technology (HIT) have great potential for this need but there is also strong resistance based on serious obstacles to achieving meaningful use. Conventional levels of software usability, predictability and cost-effectiveness of impact are not sufficient for health-critical and safety-critical applications.
Cognitive support in health informatics will depend on effective integration of information technology with user-centered design techniques, such as usability engineering, contextual research, cognitive systems engineering, task analysis, and several more. How can we apply and integrate these existing design approaches to address these needs? What are the needs for new technology for more powerful design paradigms? How can research influence priorities and strategy for health care informatics to create HIT systems that will be predictably useful, usable and cost-effective?
Topics will include:
  • Need and resistance to EHR adoption
  • The role of information in care processes
  • Major user-centered design approaches
  • The role of user-centered design in achieving process improvements
  • Integrating user-centered with software development
To join this group, you need to contact Keith Butler (Keith.A.Butler@gmail.com) no later than two weeks prior to the start of the quarter.

Mark Haselkorn
Systems Studies of Humanitarian Response and Logistics
This group will be the first of its kind, and will focus on understanding the nature of humanitarian response and logistics work and the elements which contribute to the "success" and "effectiveness" of humanitarian operations. It is intended to be interdisciplinary and welcomes students from human-centered design, logistics, international development and other fields of study. Because of the diverse make-up of students expected, the group will gather to self-define the nature of the work for the quarter. Under the guidance of Robin Mays, PhD student in HCDE with 17 years of rapid response logistics experience, we will identify course goals together (e.g., generate a seminar series, write a literature review, answer a key question, etc.). Students can register for either 496 or 596. Meeting details TBD. Please contact Robin Mays (rmays@uw.edu) with questions.

Mark Haselkorn
Enabling Operational Stakeholders to Drive the Design of Information Sharing Solutions
Complex activities such as healthcare, humanitarian operations and national security require coordination and information sharing among a diverse and complex community of stakeholders. Major Northwest ports, for example, are home to a multitude of Federal, State, Local, Tribal, International, Public, and Private Entities that require near real-time shared operational information and situational awareness to enable secure, safe, and commercially viable port operations. Port communities struggle to share and safeguard information and maintain situational awareness regarding the ever-changing demands and potential threats within the maritime domain. The resulting degree of incompatibility leads to information gaps and resource inefficiencies, limiting the daily operational effectiveness of major ports such as Puget Sound. This DRG is using field study and formal modeling of work and information flow to help the Northwest maritime security community drive the design of information sharing solutions to their numerous challenges.

Gary Hsieh

Supporting Designers of Behavior Change Technologies

Designers use a variety of software (Adobe Suite, prototyping tools, whiteboards, etc); information resources (forums, search-engines, blogs, peer discussions) and patterns (icon sets, templates, libraries) to assist their projects.

We have been studying how designers create systems to encourage behavior change. As part of this process, we plan to create and evaluate new tools to support their work. To continue our efforts, we are looking for about eight highly motivated students, with a variety of experience, interested in 2-5 credit hours. Weekly meeting days and times are TBD and will be scheduled to accommodate as many interested students as possible.

You will work with the research team to ideate, design, and construct low-fidelity prototypes to evaluate in design workshops. Depending on the results, we will design and develop final designs of the solutions, whatever they may be — software plug-ins, web sites or apps, or design resources (templates, design patterns). During the quarter, we will ideate, sketch, and dive into hands-on design exercises and critiques.


Gary Hsieh, Mia Suh
Coming to America: Building An App for International Students

We are looking for interested, motivated and responsible students to join our research group to build an online community for international students. For the last quarters, we have built a web application to support international students, and it is almost getting there.

In this quarter, we plan to polish the application, and to test its usability. To continue our efforts, we are looking for students who have prior experiences with:

  • Ruby on Rails
  • Relational Database

If you are interested, please send an email to garyhs@uw.edu and miasuh@uw.edu describing your interest in the project, your level in the program (e.g., BS, MS, PhD), relevant skills and experience, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students. Meeting time and location: TBD.


Gary Hsieh
Coming to America: Building An App for International Students

We are looking for interested and motivated students to build an online community for international students.

Studying abroad is not easy. International students have to deal with the unfamiliar contexts such as new friends, new university, and new country. The process entails rapid changes and adjustments to new environments, which need much time and effort.

This quarter, we aim to build a web application for international students in UW. For the last quarters, we have been studying about the informational needs of international students and designing an online community to support them. To continue our efforts, we are looking for students who have prior experiences with:

- Ruby on Rails
- Front-end programming (e.g., Java Scripts, HTML, CSS)
- Relational Database

If you are interested, please send an email to garyhs@uw.edu and miasuh@uw.edu describing your interest in the project, your level in the program (e.g., BS, MS, PhD), relevant skills and experience, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students. Meeting time and location: TBD.


Gary Hsieh
Exploring Cues to Action in today’s Health & Wellbeing application market

The Mobile Health Market market is growing rapidly, in the last year it was worth $4 and is expected to reach $26 bln by 2017. Applications such as Google Fit, MyFitnessPal, Fitbit are designed to motivate exercising, healthy diet, or weight loss. Other applications offer motivational reminders about medication taking, or even try to help with breaking undesirable habits, such as smoking. Many of these applications use motivational messages, visual, audio or tactile feedback, or other means of encouraging people to take action, these are so called Cues to Action. Understanding the variety of such cues offers a useful summary of the current state-of-the-art practices in health & wellbeing mobile and online markets.

Our goal in this DRG is to explore the market of existing mobile and online health & wellbeing applications, specifically those that focus on eliciting behavior change. We aim to analyze and systematize the approaches used for motivating people to change their behavior and come up with a taxonomy of available Cues to Action. To scope the DRG for this quarter we will focus mainly on the text-based Cues to Action.

By the end of the quarter we expect to have a full taxonomy of the approaches for motivating action used in mobile health & wellbeing domain. The taxonomy is meant to reveal which strategies are most and least common, which strategies are most popular in which subdomain of the health & wellbeing market, and finally identify a number of possible underexplored design directions for creating new types of Cues to Action. We are looking for a small group of students to participate in the exploration of the current health & wellbeing application market, who are willing to commit up to 9 hours (3 credits) per week to the project. There are no specific skills required for participation in this DRG.

If you are interested, please send an email to Rafal Kocielnik (rkoc@uw.edu) and Gary Hsieh (garyhs@uw.edu) describing your interest in the project, your level in the program (e.g., BS, MS, PhD), and why you want to participate in the DRG.


Gary Hsieh
Crowd and Friend-sourced Support for Behavior Change

People use online behavior change programs, such as diets, exercise programs, financial plans to better their behavior. These are often one size fits all programs, not tailored to a person's needs and context. At the same time, many people who have already tried such programs have acquired knowledge on what works or doesn’t for themselves.

Our goal is to leverage the expertise of other people with changing behavior to provide recommendations for improvement based on a person's goals, preferences, and habits. In this DRG we will develop a tool to support social recommendations for the creation of personalized step by step behavior change programs. The tool uses data that people track about their behavior, such as their food or physical activity. The tool facilitates requests and recommendations for daily improvement of behavior between an individual and their friends or strangers who are interested in helping.

By the end of the quarter we expect to have a full design of the system, and an early prototype built. We will draw on interview data from our initial prototype for this design, but may also continue iterative user-testing throughout the design process. We are looking for a small group of students to participate in the design and building of the tool, who are willing to commit at least 9 hours (3 credits) per week to the project. Skills required are: design experience (visual and interaction design) and/or programming experience (front and back end development using web frameworks such as Node.js or Django).

If you are interested, please send an email to Gary Hsieh garyhs@uw.edu, Sean Munson smunson@uw.edu, and Elena Agapie eagapie@uw.edu describing your interest in the project, your level in the program (e.g., BS, MS, PhD), relevant skills and experience, and why you want to participate in the DRG.


Gary Hsieh
Beeswax: An App to Support Local Businesses
Not only is the local economy an important component of a neighborhood’s health, autonomy and connectivity, local small businesses have also been referred to as the “lifeblood” of United States’ economy, responsible for jobs creation and the stability of our overall economy. Our goal is to explore the use of technologies to support the success of our local businesses to improve economic vitality. 
We are looking for interested and motivated students to join our research team. You will be iteratively designing and building an application to help local community members to welcome and support the businesses around them. If you are interested, please send an email to garyhs@uw.edu describing your interest in the project, your level in the program (e.g., BS, MS, PhD), relevant skills and experience, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.
We will meet once a week, for 1.5 hours (day/time TBD)

Gary Hsieh
An App to Help Assess and Track Noise Levels at Businesses and Venues 
It’s not just Century Link Field that is loud when the Seahawks play, so is your local coffee shop and hair salon. Have you ever wondered how loud is too loud? Our research is directed at designing and developing a smartphone app that allows you to track and document noise levels in your everyday environment.  It will tell you if your listening habits are putting you at risk for hearing loss, or not. Through crowd sourcing and data sharing, this app will also enable us to gather noise levels, in different locations, so people with and without hearing loss can locate social settings (restaurants, fitness centers, coffee shops etc.) where they can hear what is being said. Being able to hear a business client sitting across from you at a restaurant table, and finding the quietist seating section in Century Link Field are only a few examples.
Motivation: Approximately 15 percent (26 million) of Americans between the ages of 20 and 69 have hearing loss because of exposure to loud sounds or noise at work or in leisure activities. Approximately one in three people in the United States between 65 and 74 has hearing loss, and nearly half of those older than 75 have difficulty hearing. Hearing loss makes it hard to enjoy talking with family and friends, especially in social settings, and often leads to feelings of isolation as well as social withdrawal.
What You'll Do:  As a team, we will design and prototype a location-review app that can be used by potential users to explore and assess noise information at various social settings.
We are looking for motivated individuals to join our team. There are no prerequisites; we are looking for a group with a diverse set of skills and experiences at all levels. This research group will meet once per week during the autumn quarter from 9:30-11:30am Wednesdays?  for brainstorming sessions, updates on progress and sharing results. Students interested in this research group should email Gary Hsieh garyhs@uw.edu or Kelly Tremblay (tremblay@uw.edu) with a brief description of their interest in the projects and a description of their various skills.

Gary Hsieh
Coming to America: Designing an Online Community for Immigrants
The process of settling into a new country can be extremely challenging and stressful. It entails rapid changes and adjustments to a new environment. Not only do these immigrants need information to meet their immediate needs and solve their daily problems, they also seek social support and desire to be connected to their new environment.
We are looking for interested and motivated students to join our research team. You will be iteratively designing and building a website to facilitate the information and social needs of immigrants. If you are interested, please send an email to garyhs@uw.edu and miasuh@uw.edu  describing your interest in the project, your level in the program (e.g., BS, MS, PhD), relevant skills and experience, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.

Gary Hsieh
Designing Digital Money
From poker chips in an online hold'em game, to copper/silve/gold pieces in World of Warcraft, to tokens in a new iPhone game, to the Bitcoin icon, there are many ways to visually represent digital money to the users. However, can the design of digital money influence how people use the money? Are there designs that are “better” or “worse”? In what ways?  
This research group will:
- Survey existing designs of digital money to determine the design dimensions.
- Review literature on money and the biases in decision making when money is involved.
- Conduct experiments to test how different designs may influence behavior.
- Write and submit a research paper on findings.
If you are interested, please email Gary Hsieh (garyhs@uw.edu) with a CV/resume, and a paragraph describing why this project interests you, how your background/experiences fits with the project and the number of credit hours you are seeking (0-3 credit hours).

Gary Hsieh
Developing Motivators to Encourage Neighborhood Activism

Our physical neighborhoods hold tremendous influence over our safety, education, health, and general well-being. However, many studies have shown that civic participation in local communities has been in decline for the past 50 years. How then, can we get more people involved in their neighborhoods? Are some strategies, or motivators, more effective in encouraging certain activities, in certain neighborhoods?
This research group will:
  1. Search and review existing theoretical research on civic participation
  2. Explore and discuss successful real-world strategies to encourage civic participation
  3. Test and compare strategies in controlled and/or real-world settings
  4. Generate a taxonomy of motivators that helps outline the strengths and weaknesses of each individual strategies
We are looking for motivated individuals to join our team. There are no prerequisites; we are looking for a group with a diverse set of skills and experiences at all levels. If you are interested, please email Gary Hsieh (garyhs@uw.edu) with a CV/resume, and a paragraph describing why this project interests you, and how your background/experiences fits with the project.

Masashi Kato

Exploring association between reading strategies and reading comprehension in foreign languages through an eye tracking system 
Today, we can find many research reports on methods for developing reading skills and methods for measuring reading comprehension in the field of second language acquisition. Many materials for teaching and learning reading skills are also available now.
However, we cannot find studies on how foreign language learners at different language skill levels process written materials and what kind of influence different reading strategies have on accuracy of comprehension.
In the research group of Spring Quarter 2014, we will explore association between reading strategies and reading comprehension in foreign languages through experiments using an eye tracking system (a system for measuring eye positions and eye movement). We try to answer the following questions:
  • if eye positions and eye movement can be used as valid factors for indicating how foreign language learners read materials
  • if we can find distinctive patterns of reading strategies among learners with different language skill levels (including native speakers) using an eye tracking system
  • if different reading strategies lead to different degrees of accuracy of comprehension
  • if we can find the same association between different reading strategies and different comprehension levels among different language learners
  • if we can find the same association between different reading strategies and different comprehension levels when reading different types of written materials - books, newspapers, web pages, and the like
  • if we can teach advanced reading strategies to those at lower language skill levels for better comprehension
This research group is open to undergraduate and graduate students of any major and department. Participants in this research group will enroll for 2 credits (CR/NC) in HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). The meeting day and time will be determined according to participants' preference. Students interested in this research group should email Masashi Kato (mkato@uw.edu).

Masashi Kato
Exploring association between reading strategies and reading comprehension in foreign languages through an eye tracking system
(Fall 2013)
Today, we can find many research reports on methods for developing reading skills and methods for measuring reading comprehension in the field of second language acquisition. Many materials for teaching and learning reading skills are also available now.
However, we cannot find studies on how foreign language learners at different language skill levels process written materials and what kind of influence different reading strategies have on accuracy of comprehension.
In the research group of Fall Quarter 2013, we will explore association between reading strategies and reading comprehension in foreign languages through experiments using an eye tracking system (a system for measuring eye positions and eye movement). We try to answer the following questions:
  • if eye positions and eye movement can be used as valid factors for indicating how foreign language learners read materials
  • if we can find distinctive patterns of reading strategies among learners with different language skill levels (including native speakers) using an eye tracking system
  • if different reading strategies lead to different degrees of accuracy of comprehension
  • if we can find the same association between different reading strategies and different comprehension levels among different language learners
  • if we can find the same association between different reading strategies and different comprehension levels when reading different types of written materials - books, newspapers, web pages, and the like
  • if we can teach advanced reading strategies to those at lower language skill levels for better comprehension
This research group is open to undergraduate and graduate students of any major and department. Participants in this research group will enroll for 2 credits (CR/NC) in HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). The meeting day and time will be determined according to participants' preference. Students interested in this research group should email Masashi Kato (mkato@uw.edu).

Julie Kientz

Study on How User Feedback Changes Over Time
Summer 2017

Have you ever wondered how long to run a user deployment study? And how feedback changes over time the longer someone uses your application?

We are interested in running a study to understand how user feedback changes the longer someone uses a system.

We are looking for 2 students to help with getting a 1 year study up and running for evaluating two different systems: a tool for parents to help track their children’s progress and a smartphone application for helping minimize use of “time wasting” apps. We will have participants submit feedback surveys through the study and attempt to understand when they drop off and how feedback changes over time and at what point data saturation is reached.

Experience with managing remote study participants and using Mechanical Turk is a plus, but is not required. We expect students to register for 2 credit hours.

Weekly meetings will be either on Tuesday or Wednesday afternoons sometime between 3-5 starting the week of June 19th and will go through August 18th – you can indicate your availability in the survey.

This DRG will be run jointly by Hyewon Suh (Ph.D. student) and Julie Kientz (Associate Professor).

Participatory Design with Children and Researchers
Summer 2017

We are looking for 4 students for the Summer 2017 to help with running KidsTeam UW, an intergenerational co-design team of children (ages 6 – 12) and design researchers. There is rich work around how to interact with adults and children together in the co-design space, the role of design techniques in co-design, and the different stages and phases of co-design. You have the opportunity to help us understand this space.

Activities of this research group will include interacting as an adult design partner with children in co-design, working with researchers on multiple projects involving children and design, and running overall logistics to support the intergenerational design team. 

This DRG will require you to participate at least once in KidsTeam UW in the summer from July 31 to August 4th (9:00 am to 4:30 pm, or multiple days with mornings / afternoons). Students who have completed HCDE 318/418/518 and/or HCDE 417/517 or have relevant experience will be given priority. 

Alternatively, students who have experience with learning sciences, education, and child development will also be considered. 

We expect students to register for 3 credits of HCDE 496/596.

This research group will be led by Assistant Professor Jason Yip (iSchool), with support from Laura Pina and  Associate Professor Julie Kientz (HCDE).

Persona development: Health information practices of older adults and stakeholders
Summer 2017

This Directed Research Group is looking for up to 2 students for the summer quarter to help with a project called, SOARING (Studying Older Adults & Researching Information Needs and Goals) which is aimed at understanding the ways older adults manage their personal health information and the role that stakeholders such as, caregivers, providers and family members play in those activities. The project team has been doing qualitative fieldwork with older adults to understand their health information practices and needs. They have also done interviews with stakeholders. During the summer quarter, we will dive into the research that has been collected to create personas and scenarios. We will also validate these personas and scenarios by conducting a focus group with older adults and interviews with stakeholders. The focus group and interviews are likely to be conducted off campus.
                                                  
We are looking for students who have experience with developing personas and scenarios, has familiarity with conducting focus groups and is able to help with analyzing qualitative data.
 
DRG meeting times will be Wednesdays from 1p-2p and you are also welcomed to join in the SOARING team meetings from 2p-3p. We expect students to register for 2-3 credits of HCDE 496 or HCDE 596.

This research group will be led by PhD student Dawn Sakaguchi-Tang, with guidance from Associate Professor Julie Kientz (HCDE).

Developing a Validated Measure of User Value
Summer 2017

Previously, we have investigated what constitutes user burdens in computing technologies (https://www.hcde.washington.edu/files/news/Suh-UserBurdenScale-CHI2016.pdf) and that led us to think what constitutes user values. Because some technologies expose high user burden but if a user finds greater value in using, they’d sacrifice/endure existing burden and sustain use. So we are interested in finding what exactly constitutes user values associated with computing systems and how they affect people’s willingness to accept and reject/refrain their use and ways to measure them.

We are looking for two students this Summer Quarter to help with developing and validating a scale for assessing user value. We expect students to register for 3 credits of HCDE 496/596. We will begin the quarter by reading papers about other similar scales and how they have been validated and used. We will then brainstorm questions, refine them, and validate them using quantitative statistical approaches. A previous class in statistics or quantitative methods would be helpful, but a willingness to learn would also work. As we are planning to submit this work to relevant HCI conferences or journals, students seeking for publication opportunities are welcome.

This research group will be led by PhD Candidate Hyewon Suh, with guidance from Associate Professor Julie Kientz.

Amazon Alexa: Understanding the role of Voice Assisted Technology in the Home
Spring 2017

Led by PhD student Taryn Bipat

Voice activated assistants are becoming increasingly more prominent in homes across the globe. This is a new computing interface that is beginning to impact our behaviors and interactions similar to mobile phones but with voice rather than a visual screen.  The goal of this project is to understand the the impact this developing technology has on human behavior and to understand the stakeholders perceptions of voice assisted technology. 

We are looking for up to 4 students for the Spring quarter to help with a study understanding the use and impact of Amazon Alexa in the home. As part of this research, you will be using a grounded theory method to analyze data from Amazon.com, online forums, interviews and surveys. At the end of the quarter, students will have a better understanding of how to find emerging patterns in the data and how to translate those findings. In the future, we hope to use these preliminary findings in partnership with KidsTeam UW to create and conduct studies focusing on children and families' uses and perceptions of Alexa.

We are looking for students, who have experience with or a willingness to learn (1) qualitative coding and (2) user testing and interviewing methods. It is not necessary but experience with web scraping will be helpful. 

This is a 3-credit research group offered to undergraduate (HCDE 496) and graduate (HCDE 596) students. Students will meet for 1.5 hours every week and should commit around 4 hours outside of class time. 

This research group will be led by PhD student Taryn Bipat, with guidance from Associate Professor Julie Kientz (HCDE).

 

Julie Kientz

Children's Technology Self-Regulation Research
Spring 2017

Led by PhD student Alexis Hiniker

We are looking for up to 3 students for Spring quarter to help with a study on teaching self-regulation pre-school aged children (ages 3-5). The project, sponsored by Sesame Workshop, will evaluate whether a commercially available iPad app, Cookie Monster’s Challenge, can teach children self-regulation skills. As part of this research, you will help with running a study with children at Head Start and other local schools to work with children to collect data and aid with video analysis of the findings. If you’re interested, you can also help with writing the results up for publication. Participants will need to be able to get to on-site study venues at Head Start locations around the Seattle area, either by car or public transit.

Specifically, we are looking for motivated students who have (1) experience conducting user tests of interactive technologies; (2) experience working with children or a desire to learn; (3) the ability to learn to help with coding videos for data analysis. If you have experience working with children who are English Language Learners, that is also a plus.

This research group will be led by PhD student Alexis Hiniker, with guidance from Associate Professor Julie Kientz (HCDE).

 

Julie Kientz

Game Accessibility Metadata
Spring 2017

Led by HCDE PhD candidate John Porter

This DRG is being offered as a collaboration between HCDE's CHiLL Lab and the iSchool's GAMER Lab. We are looking for up to 4 students this quarter to help with designing and conducting a survey and series of interviews exploring issues surrounding game accessibility to players with motor impairments. This project seeks to better understand and catalog which mechanics and interactions factor into determining a game's accessibility or inaccessibility to a diverse range of motor impaired users. This information will be used to expand the Video Game Metadata Schema (developed by the iSchool's GAMER Lab) to capture a broad set of descriptive qualities, enabling one to make informed predictions about a given game's accessibility based on individual needs.

Activities for this research group will include the opportunity to participate in the design of a survey instrument and of a semistructured interview protocol, working with the research team to conduct interviews of gamers with motor impairments to learn about their experiences, and data analysis. Priority will be given to HCDE and iSchool students who have completed HCDE 417/517, or who have comparable coursework or other experience with user research methods.

Participating students will register for 3 credits of HCDE 496/596, and should expect to commit up to 9 hours per week (depending on project needs in a given week) on this DRG between meetings, group collaboration, and independent work.

This research group will be led by HCDE PhD candidate John Porter, with guidance from Associate Professor Julie Kientz (HCDE) and Associate Professor Jinha Lee (iSchool).

 

Julie Kientz

Youth mental health: a family-oriented approach
Spring 2017

DRG led by Professors Julie Kientz and Sean Munson, and PhD student Arpita Bhattacharya

Teenage years and young adulthood are significant stages of transitioning through rapidly changing social dynamics, career pathways, and exposure to unfamiliar circumstances. Reduction in stress has many benefits in social and mental well-being for thriving, as well as in improving treatment outcomes for physical and mental health challenges. What strategies can help youth to cope with stressful situations and start leveraging skills and resources for developing resilience towards stressful events?  

Family members and caregivers can be supportive social resources accessible to most (but not all) youth and may also be a source of interesting social tensions for youth seeking to become less dependent. Risk taking and learning are important aspects of development, and not all events are predictable, avoidable, or can be under control of a parent.  How can stress and mental health be approached from a family perspective?

In this project, we will involve youth and their families in design activities to understand what they think should be the role of technology in helping them manage and mediate support under stressful circumstances.

Activities: We expect to sketch and brainstorm design ideas, design and conduct focus group workshops and interviews with participants, and analyze qualitative data. Readings and discussions will be based on what will help the team learn related work and relevant skills. We look forward to working with 2-3 students who have interest in the topic, have prior experience in conducting focus groups and analyzing qualitative data such as HCDE 313/418/518, and/or have worked on projects in mental health. Depending on progress, students may have the option to continue on this project after the quarter ends.

Caution: We expect study participants to describe situations and emotions that they find stressful. Students in the team will be exposed to data which may also involve narratives on adverse events or trauma. We will work together to be supportive of one another, however, if you are negatively triggered by such content, we encourage you to take necessary measures for self-care while engaging in the project.

Time: We will decide a time based on the team’s availability. All students participating in the DRG, must attend weekly meetings for 90 minutes. Work outside of the meetings will include reading, contributing to design of study materials, conducting focus groups, interviews, analyzing survey and interview results, and writing results to share. You can register for 1–3 credit hours in HCDE 496/596; for each credit you should expect to spend about three hours of work per week outside of meeting times.

 

Directed Research Group on Technology for Inclusive Play
Winter 2017

Led by PhD student Kiley Sobel

We are looking for two students this Winter Quarter to help with the design and development of an interactive cooperative iPad application for inclusive play (or play among children with and without disabilities). This application will be used in a two-month design intervention in an inclusive kindergarten classroom during Spring Quarter. (To learn more about this application and research project, see the following paper: https://www.hcde.washington.edu/files/news/Incloodle.pdf.)

Specifically, we are looking for motivated students who have either (1) visual / graphic design skills, and/or (2) programming skills and experience with (or a willingness to quickly learn) Swift / iOS development.

We expect students to register for 3 credits of HCDE 496/596.

This research group will be led by PhD student Kiley Sobel, with guidance from Associate Professor Julie Kientz (HCDE).

If you are interested, please fill out the following survey: https://goo.gl/forms/M4EAllk1IU49ApbE2.

Designing for Family Health Informatics
Winter 2017

Led by Research Associate Laura Pina

We are looking for 4 students for Winter Quarter to help with us with building, testing, deploying, and evaluating technologies for family health. Our work focuses on family health. There is rich work around how to design for personal health but less on how to design in the family context — where the health of every family member depends on one another.  You have the opportunity to help us understand this space.

Activities of this research group will include working with the research team to prototype and build health data tracking tools to enable family members to think about their health together. This DRG will require you to have design skills, technical programming skills, and deploy and interview in family homes. We are looking for students with web development: such as python, javascript and visualization libraries, such as D3, C3, and others. Alternatively, students who have completed HCDE 318/418/518 and/or HCDE 417/517 or have relevant experience will be given priority.

We expect students to register for 3 credits of HCDE 496/596.

This research group will be led by Research Associate Laura Pina, with guidance from Associate Professor Julie Kientz.

Interested? Please complete the following survey by December 12, 2016. After that time, you will be contacted to have a quick meeting depending on the match, and given an add code to register. Students that complete the survey after the deadline will be added to a waitlist. 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdBAjw8c0Cs-8gM87uzTX9OWHPqtBZ2uVjzABDx2BSExYZaag/viewform

Epiphany moments: Understanding catalysts for health behavior change
Autumn 2016

What can we learn from people who are working towards or have achieved changes in their health behavior? Are there specific moments of “epiphanies” that motivated them to take steps towards positive health outcomes? Theories of behavior change and prior work suggest that many factors come into play to catalyze an individual’s process of behavior change, such as social pressure, increased self-awareness or self-knowledge, and lifestyle changes. In this DRG, we will aim to gain in-depth empirical understanding of these factors and explore if we can design technology to catalyze such motivators of behavior change for those who are not yet motivated to change.

Activities: We expect to work together on to design and conduct interviews, surveys, qualitative analysis, and brainstorming design ideas. Readings and discussions will be based on what will help the team learn related work and relevant skills. We look forward to work with 3-4 students who have interest in the topic and/or have prior experience in conducting interviews and analyzing qualitative data such as HCDE 313/418/518. Depending on progress, students may have the option to continue on this project after the quarter ends.


Julie Kientz
Research Group on User Testing of SmartQuit smoking cessation app

We are looking for 3 motivated students for Winter Quarter to help with designing and conducting user studies and usability testing for a new smartphone application for assisting with smoking cessation, called SmartQuit. 

Activities in this research group will include working with the research team to construct low-fidelity prototypes suitable for testing with focus groups, usability testing, and possibly expert evaluation such as heuristic evaluation. Completion of HCDE 318/518 and/or HCDE 417/517 is preferred, but not required.

This research group, led by HCDE Associate Professor Julie Kientz, is in collaboration with Fred Hutch Cancer Research Institute and 2Morrow Mobile. 


Julie Kientz, Laura Pina
Participatory Design with Children and Researchers

We are looking for 4 students for the Summer 2016 to help with running KidsTeam UW, an intergenerational co-design team of children (ages 6 – 12) and design researchers. There is rich work around how to interact with adults and children together in the co-design space, the role of design techniques in co-design, and the different stages and phases of co-design. You have the opportunity to help us understand this space.

Activities of this research group will include interacting as an adult design partner with children in co-design, working with researchers on multiple projects involving children and design, and running overall logistics to support the intergenerational design team. 

This DRG will require you to participate at least once in KidsTeam UW in the summer from August 8 – 12 (9:00 am to 4:30 pm, or multiple days with mornings / afternoons). Students who have completed HCDE 318/418/518 and/or HCDE 417/517 or have relevant experience will be given priority. Alternatively, students who have experience with learning sciences, education, and child development will also be considered. 

We expect students to register for 3 credits of HCDE 496/596.

This research group will be led by Research Associate Laura Pina, with guidance from Assistant Professor Jason Yip (iSchool) and Associate Professor Julie Kientz (HCDE)

 


Julie Kientz, Laura Pina
Understanding and Designing for a Family Perspective on Health Informatics

We are looking for 4 students for Spring Quarter to help with conducting interviews and design sessions that focus on family health. There is rich work around how to design for personal health but less on how to design in the family context — where the health of every family member depends on one another.  You have the opportunity to help us understand this space.

Activities of this research group will include working with the research team to conduct interviews with families, analyze data, and potentially build and prototype health data tracking tools to enable family members to think about their health together. This DRG will require you to interview families at their home. Students who have completed HCDE 318/418/518 and/or HCDE 417/517 or have relevant experience will be given priority. Alternatively, students who have experience with Android prototyping and development will also be considered. 

We expect students to register for 3 credits of HCDE 496/596. Interested? Please complete the following survey by March 9th. After that time, depending on availability, you will be given an add code to register or be added to a waitlist: http://goo.gl/forms/jp6czx8BUk


 

Julie Kientz
Technology Use and Family Life
Join us this winter to explore the ways that families integrate technology into daily life, and the ways in which they resist technology in favor of spending time together. Prior work shows that children and parents alike feel frustration with other family members' use of technology but few supports exist to help address this challenge. We will be designing, implementing, and assessing a tool for enabling families to establish and enforce "technology contracts." These contracts are intended to help family members of all ages define and stick to the screen-time behaviors that they feel work best for them and their family.
This group will be co-led by PhD student Alexis Hiniker (alexisr@uw.edu) and Associate Professor Julie Kientz (jkientz@uw.edu). If interested, please complete this survey indicating interest in the group by December 1. We will notify you in the first week of December if we can accommodate you in the group based on demand. Group will meet Thursdays from 2-3:30 p.m.. Available for 2 or 3 credits.

Julie Kientz
Evaluating a Game to Promote Inclusion of Young Children

This DRG will focus on running an experimental study to determine how effective a tablet application is at supporting play between children ages 4-7 who are typically developing and who experience social, emotional, communication, or other similar disabilities.

In July, we will carry out the study with multiple dyads of children. In August, we will code the collected video data. Participants in the DRG will be expected to facilitate the study by doing tasks such as recording video, taking notes, greeting and debriefing participants, etc. and then help with coding.

The DRG is co-led by HCDE PhD student Kiley Sobel and Associate Professor Julie Kientz. If you are interested in registering, please contact Kiley Sobel at ksobel@uw.edu.

Register for 2-3 credits.
Meeting times/place: TBD


Julie Kientz
Reading Group: Game Design and Theory
This reading group will bring together students and faculty to read and discuss research papers relevant to the design, evaluation, and theory of games and video games. Each week, there will be two students assigned to choose and lead the group a discussion on a single paper they select. This will be a 1-credit hour course for HCDE 596, with 2 hours per week of reading and 1 hour per week of group discussion. The group will meet on Mondays from 12–1 p.m. in 420 Sieg Hall. This group will be co-led by Ph.D student John Porter and Associate Professor Julie Kientz. If you are interested in registering, please contact John Porter at jrporter@uw.edu.


 
Julie Kientz
Can Smartphone Usage Predict Sleep Status?
Sleep is an important component of health. With long-term, behavioral sleep issues such as insomnia, monitoring the amount of sleep you get can be an important part of helping to find the causes of the problems and work on a solution. Current sleep sensors often require on-the-body sensors and that the user must remember to put it on or turn it on every night, which can lead to high user burden and unreliable data. These issues make it difficult for users to learn about their sleep behaviors over the long term.
In this directed research group, we will be working on a new way of identifying sleep behaviors by looking at how people use their smart phones. For example, many people have the habit of charging their phone while they sleep, or the phone may not move for several consecutive hours. The work involved will be collecting data via phone usage logs as well as “ground truth” data via commercial sleep sensors and manual sleep diaries, and then applying machine learning techniques (using the Weka toolkit) to determine whether we can build a model that predicts a user’s sleep status. We already have access to an Android-based logging tool and commercial sleep sensors, so part of the work for this group will be to recruit participants, set up the logging tool on their phone, give them the sleep sensors, and collect information from them and analyze it.
Students participating would benefit from having some familiarity with Android phones, basic programming skills (in case we need to do any modifications to the logging tool), and quantitative data analysis skills (or a willingness to learn).
Meeting times for Spring 2014 are Thursdays from 3:30-5:00. 

Julie Kientz
Mobile App Design for Preschoolers
More iTunes apps are designed for toddlers and preschoolers than for any other age group, yet these apps routinely draw on interaction design paradigms created for adults. These UI decisions don’t always translate well, and we will be exploring new design solutions to make children’s games more developmentally appropriate.
Join us this fall to shift the way children’s games are created. We are looking for students to work on reviewing relevant design literature, brainstorming design solutions, creating both paper and high-fi mock ups, implementing tablet prototypes, and (most importantly!) testing apps with kids. If you are interested in designing for HCI’s youngest and most playful users, we’d love to hear from you. Send mail to jkientz@uw.edu and alexisr@uw.edu describing your interest in the group, your level in the program (e.g., BS, MS, PhD), relevant skills and experience, and the number of credits you are seeking. Space will be limited to approximately 5 students based on fit. We will confirm ability to register by September 1.
  • This DRG will be co-led by Professor Julie Kientz and PhD student Alexis Hiniker.
  • We meet weekly on Thursdays from 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. (tentative).
  • You can register for 2-3 credits.

Julie Kientz
Designing Information Technology for Healthy Living (2008)
Information technologies have a vast potential to enable individuals and families improve the health of their lifestyles. Mobile technologies, persuasive technologies, and collaborative technologies can all support people in setting and achieving goals, such as a healthier diet, better record keeping for their health, and supporting a sustainable lifestyle.
This research group will focus on these topics using a standard Human-Computer Interaction design process by determining design requirements through qualitative evaluations, coming up with design concepts based on those requirements, developing prototypes of different concepts, and evaluating the prototypes with real users. Particular focus for the Winter 2008 quarter will be given to designing and prototyping technologies for aiding individuals with improving their sleep habits.
This research group will meet once per week during the Winter 2008 quarter on Wednesdays from 4:30 to 5:30 for brainstorming sessions, updates on progress, and sharing results. Students interested in this research group should email Julie Kientz (jkientz@u.washington.edu) with a brief description of their interest in the projects and a description of their various skills. Students with technical prototyping skills or a desire to learn them are especially encouraged to apply.

Julie Kientz
Persuasive Technologies (Autumn 2009–Spring 2010)
Persuasive technologies are being increasingly used to encourage users to lead healthier lifestyles.  Web-based, mobile technologies, video games, and social networking tools have all been used to encourage people to exercise more, eat healthier, stop smoking, drink more water, or get more sleep.
This research group will bring together people who are interested in evaluating technologies that encourage users to make better choices that can lead to healthier outcomes. Over the 2009–2010 academic year, we will explore the space for persuasive technologies for health and determine open research questions. In the Spring 2010 quarter, we will continue our study of developing and validating heuristics for evaluating persuasive technologies by applying them to existing persuasive systems.
If you are interested in participating in this group, please send an email to Julie Kientz (jkientz@uw.edu) with a short statement of your interests in the group and your skills. Weekly meetings will be held on Wednesdays from 4:00–5:00 P.M. Space is limited, and preference will be given to returning students from previous quarters.
Recommended background reading:
Fogg, B. J. 2002. Persuasive technology: using computers to change what we think and do. Link to book.

Julie Kientz
Designing Interfaces that Make us Think (Autumn 2010–Spring 2011)
The advent of computers has made many things much easier in our lives. With mobile phone contact lists, we no longer have to memorize phone numbers, and with Google, we never have to remember anything because we can always just look it up again. Calculators and now advanced systems like Wolfram Alpha have reduced the need for being able to solve complex math problems. While these conveniences have been fantastic for our productivity, there is still some cognitive value to being encouraged to think and learn. Researchers have been exploring the ways that different activities can slow cognitive decline and onset of age-related memory disorders such as dementia or Alzheimer's. Games such as Nintendo's Brain Age are a start to putting these types of activities within reach of users.
In this research group, we will be researching and designing ways that computing interfaces can actually make us think more rather than less. The research will include determining opportune times to make tasks cognitively harder, the ways that are acceptable to make users think more without being frustrating or annoying, and the ways the tasks can be seamlessly integrated into people's everyday tasks. Examples may include a Firefox extension that requires you to solve 10 simple arithmetic problems before you load Facebook or switching the order of items on a person's iGoogle home page every visit.
The research tasks involved will be to review related literature in human-computer interaction and cognitive psychology, brainstorm ideas for new technologies, prototype high-fidelity prototypes, and determine ways for evaluating the prototypes.
The research group is limited to 8 students, and if there is a high demand, preference will be given to students who are willing to commit for more than one quarter. If you are interested in being in the research group, please send an email to Julie Kientz (jkientz@uw.edu) with a paragraph describing your interest in the group and a bit of information about your background, skill set, and career goals. You can sign up for 2 or 3 credit hours. The ability to prototype interactive, high-fidelity interfaces, such as using Flash, Python, Axure, or Balsamiq, or any programming language, is a plus.

Julie Kientz
Designing Computing Technology for Tracking Children's Developmental Progress (2011-2012)
This year, my directed research group will focus on designing and developing technology for promoting healthy development in families with young children. This work will contribute toward a project funded by the National Science Foundation. The goal of this project is to design and evaluate novel technologies that will help to track developmental progress in children under the age of 5 to aid in the early detection of developmental delays. For the past several years, I have been working on this problem through a project called Baby Steps. One of the primary strategies has been to use sentimental record-keeping, such as photos, videos, and stories, as a motivator for also tracking developmental progress. We will continue along these lines, as well as come up with new approaches to encourage parents to track their child's progress.
Motivation: The State of Washington has a goal to screen all children under the age of 5 for developmental milestones on a regular basis, and store that information into a centralized database that is accessible from any medical institution, health clinic, or daycare provider. Screening usually consists of parents completing 30 item questionnaires on their child's developmental progress every 2–3 months for their first 5 years of life. Example questions include items such as whether they can stack blocks, make eye contact, play with toys in an imaginative way, respond to their name, or climb up stairs. One of the challenges of this project is to find a way to reach everyone in the state, regardless of their background, culture, income level, literacy, education level, or access to technology.
What You'll Do: Our task is to brainstorm creative ways of using different types of technologies to populate this database that can reach anyone in the State of Washington. We will conduct a user-centered process to understand the problem more fully, design brainstorm to uncover new ideas, prototype those ideas, and then evaluate the effectiveness of those technologies for meeting the needs of the stakeholders.
Meeting Time: The group will meet from 3:00–4:30 on Tuesdays in Sieg Hall to discuss progress and plan for the quarter. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.
Timeframe
  • Autumn 2011 quarter will focus on formative studies, including interviews, surveys, etc. to see develop design requirements, personas, and more for technologies that can reach mu
  • Winter 2012 will focus on design brainstorming. Students will pair up in teams and will choose a persona and design and prototype a technology that will meet the needs of that persona group.
  • Spring 2012 will focus on evaluating the prototypes with families and other stakeholders.
Registration: Students will be able to register for up to 3 credit hours of credit/no credit grade of either HCDE 496 or HCDE 596. Because space may be limited, if you are interested in registering, please complete the survey below. The deadline for completing this survey is March 1st, after which you will either be given an add code to register or placed on the wait list. Survey submissions received after March 1st will be placed on the wait list.

Julie Kientz
Gameplay Design and Theory Reading Group (2011)
Selected readings on the fundamentals of gameplay design and usability which are distinguishable from typical usability and design research (IE, Rules of Play, Ludology, Gaming Theory, Flow) and their application to domains within HCI. Workload expectations: At UW, 1 credit = 3 hours of activity. For our seminar, I expect that this will translate to 2 hours of reading and 1 hour of discussion.

Julie Kientz
Designing Computing Technology for Tracking Children's Developmental Progress (Winter & Spring 2013)
For Winter and Spring 2013 quarters, my directed research group will be working on prototyping and running a study of a system that uses social media to encourage developmental milestone tracking by parents of young children. This work will build upon user research already conducted by the Baby Steps project, funded by the National Science Foundation. We will use Twitter and/or Facebook to proactively prompt parents to track and respond to their young child's milestones such as taking their first steps, responding to verbal communication, and making eye contact. After designing a system for supporting prompting and data collection, we will the conduct a research study evaluating its effectiveness.
Research activities for each quarter will include:
Spring 2013—Meetings on Thursdays from 2:30–4:00
  • Design a mechanism for using Twitter and/or Facebook to prompt on developmental milestones and collect and store parent responses
  • Develop a functional prototype of social media application
  • Debug and do usability testing on a functional prototype
  • Design a field study for evaluating the prototype
Spring 2013—Meetings on Wednesdays from 2:00–3:30
  • Execute on the study designed during Winter 2013 quarter
  • Recruit participants and conduct interviews/study procedures
  • Collect and analyze data
  • Write up study results and submit for publication
If you are interested in participating, please complete the Catalyst survey by December 3. I will notify participants and provide add codes by December 7. If there are more people interested in participating than we have room to accommodate, I will prioritize based on relevant skill sets (or a willingness to learn) and the ability to commit for both quarters. Students with Python, web programming, and/or database skills are especially needed for Winter 2013 quarter. Students with experience working with user populations, conducting user testing, and doing data analysis are especially needed for Spring 2013 quarter.

Julie Kientz
Developing a Validated Measure of User Burden (Autumn 2013)
In any interactive technology, there is often some amount of burden placed on the user that can prevent its use and adoption. Burdens can include mental, physical, emotional, financial, time, privacy, or access. For example, a food journaling application may induce too significant of a mental, time, and emotional burden on the user that may prevent adoption. If we have a better way of assessing these different burdens, we can hopefully design better systems.
Currently, other than just asking participants, there is no way of assessing user burden in a systematic or comparable way. Researchers have adopted scales such as the NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX), the System Usability Scale (SUS), or the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to assess technologies, but there is not yet a scale that assesses user burden.
The goal of this research group will be to develop and validate a scale for assessing user burden. We will begin the quarter by reading papers about other similar scales and how they have been validated and used. We will then brainstorm questions, refine them, and validate them using quantitative statistical approaches. A previous class in statistics or quantitative methods would be helpful, but a willingness to learn would also work.
Weekly meetings will take place on Mondays from 3:00 to 4:00 P.M. in Sieg 420.
If you are interested in participating, please email Julie Kientz (jkientz@uw.edu) with a copy of your resume/C.V. and a short statement expressing your interests in the group.

Julie Kientz
Reading Group: Game Design and Theory (Winter 2014)
This reading group will bring together students and faculty to read and discuss research papers relevant to the design, evaluation, and theory of games and video games. Each week, there will be two students assigned to choose and lead the group a discussion on a single paper they select. This will be a 1-credit hour course for HCDE 596, with 2 hours per week of reading and 1 hour per week of group discussion. The group will meet on Thursdays from 3:30-4:30 p.m. (Room TBA). This group will be co-led by Professor Julie Kientz and Ph.D. student John Porter. If you are interested in registering, please contact John Porter at jporter@uw.edu.

Beth Kolko

Human-Centered Design and Entrepreneurship
Winter 2017

2 Credit Directed Research Group

Design thinking has made its way to business schools, startup culture and conferences (Lean Startup), and even life coaching (http://web.stanford.edu/class/me104b/cgi-bin/). In this research group, we'll explore how an HCDE background can be leveraged for startup success.

We'll be doing some reading, listening to some visitors from the startup community, and doing some interviewing of startup founders to learn more about their background and approach to problem-solving. The goal of this group is to help articulate the habits of mind integral to HCDE that are directly relevant to building a startup.

The group will meet Wednesdays from 8:30-9:30 a.m.

To apply, contact Professor Kolko at bkolko@uw.edu with a short email describing your interest in the topic.

About this group: A few years ago, I started a medical device company called Shift Labs. Our company went through Y Combinator in 2015, and our flagship product was just named one of the 12 most important healthcare innovations of 2016 by Popular Science.

In the past several years, I've been continually delighted by the ways HCDE has provided a valuable framework for startup growth, and I'm leading this DRG to provide an opportunity for students to better understand connections between HCDE curriculum and research and what it means to build an organization, a product, a customer base, a revenue model, and all the other components that go into growing a sustainable startup.

Hackademia: CAD and 3D printing extravaganza

In the fall of 2012, the Hackademia project is going to focus on 3D modelling and printing. We have two Makerbots that need a little TLC, and we'll be asking two students to take the lead on tuning them and helping them stay happy. Some students may also wish to make their own 3D printers from various open source projects, and there are a bunch of other 3D printing facilities on campus open to all students.
On the software side of things, we'll experiment with a handful of different tools; no prior experience is necessary. We'll look at free packages like Autocad (free for students) and 123D, and other programs like SketchUp, ReplicatorG, and Blender. If you have access to Solidworks or want to invest in a copy, that's welcome, too!
Students will have the option to work alone or in groups, and the goal is to design and print a substantive, shareable (on thingiverse) project by the end of the quarter. The only prerequisite is an interest in learning how to do 3D -- no specific technical experience is required.
The group is open to undergrads and graduate students of any major/department. We'll be meeting on Tuesday from 9:00-10:30. Enrollment is limited, so please email Beth Kolko at bkolko@uw.edu sooner rather than later to secure a spot. HCDE students Nikki Lee and Julia Chamberlain will be helping run the group, so feel free to ask them questions as well: Nikki Lee, Julia Chamberlain.
3D printing is awesome and will potentially change everything. It's also super great for prototyping. Come learn about it!

Beth Kolko
Design as Futurism (aka Science Fiction Book Club)
When you build a technology, you're creating something that shapes the world not just today, not just tomorrow, but for years to come. It can be challenging to conceptualize how our design choices are likely to impact individuals and society, and so we often don't do the work to extrapolate the consequences of our design choices. Doing so requires situating technology within societal and institutional structures and understanding enough about those structures to make informed decisions. In this research group we'll use an alternative way of thinking about the implications of the technologies we work to create -- a speculative approach. We'll read 3 to 4 science fiction novels together and discuss them with an eye to how the core technologies at the heart of the books interact with societal structures to create the future world that is depicted. In addition, each group member will do two pieces of speculative writing of their own for the group to discuss. This will take the form of imagined future news stories, blog posts, or abstracts of scientific papers. In this writing, you will take a core technology that exists today and speculate how it may interact with societal and institutional structures to create a possible future. 
Maximum enrollment: 10 students.
Email Professor Kolko at bkolko@uw.edu to request an add code.

Beth Kolko
Safer conception with mHealth
For serodiscordant couples -- in which one partner has HIV and one does not -- attempting to conceive a child brings with it the risk of transmission. More robust fertility planning in combination with treatment adherence can reduce the risk of transmission. As part of larger NIH-funded project in conjunction with UW Global Health researchers, we’ll be working with Kenyan partners to pilot an mHealth intervention that has a mobile component aimed at clinicians working with serodiscordant couples who are trying to conceive. 
This winter we’ll be prototyping the front end of an Android app for the clinicians to use for counseling couples on their antiretroviral treatment adherence, pre-exposure prophylaxis, and fertility cycles with the goal of reducing transmission during conception. The prototype[s] will then be reviewed by clinicians before developing the app. 
We invite students with experience prototyping and an interest in mHealth to this DRG co-led by PhD student Kristin Dew and Prof. Beth Kolko. You must have experience prototyping and be comfortable using Axure. We will be limiting the group to <10 students. If you’re interested, please complete this questionnaire:https://docs.google.com/a/uw.edu/forms/d/1_mGBtFFzMYlhW1jaEU7LMmm4sU8AkV...
The DRG will be in workshop format and will meet Wednesdays from 5-6pm. Available for 2 credits.


Beth Kolko
Qualitative research methods for low-resource environments 
 
Led by UW HCDE and iHub Nairobi
Lead instructors: Beth Kolko (HCDE), Angela Crandall (iHub Research), Mark Kamau (iHub UX Lab)
 
HCDE 496/596 is 2 credits
 
About *iHub_:
*iHub_, the first of its kind in Kenya, has spurred a revolution in the African technology products and services space by giving the local tech community support needed to bring ideas to life. Our mission is to catalyze the Nairobi tech community’s growth and we do this through surfacing information, connecting people, and supporting start-ups.
In addition to the facility itself, *iHub_ leverages on its initiatives to provide value-added services to the tech community:
iHub Research focuses on technology and its uses in East Africa. We facilitate local research capacity building and conduct local qualitative and quantitative research in East Africa, by East Africans. By bringing information on technology and its uses to the technology community, we enable entrepreneurs and developers to make better decisions on what to build and how to build it.
iHub UX Lab focuses on the use of Human Centered Design methods to develop solutions for African challenges.  We facilitate the development of a User Experience Design culture by enabling the community embrace user experience research and design approaches in the development of products and services. We help the community put the user first at the center of their approach. This means that more products are relevant, contextualized, and meet the needs of people they target.
 
This is a joint research group between UW HCDE and *iHub_ on new or adapted qualitative research methods in low resource environments. This will be a collaborative group that brings together researchers from Nairobi and Seattle to develop and deploy sound, innovative qualitative research methods. We will be working on a technology project jointly developed with UW and the global health NGO PATH -- a low-cost flash-heat pasteurizing system for human breast milk that allows babies to be safely fed donor breast milk.
 
The group will begin with a joint reading group focused on UX with a focus on global issues, and we will then spend the bulk of the quarter designing and conducting a study around the pasteurization system. Seattle students will work on teams with Nairobi-based researchers.  The objective of the group is to adapt research methods to low-resource environments by running tests in users' contexts. 

Beth Kolko
Design for Digital Inclusion (Winter 2012)
For Winter 2012, the DDI research group will team up with Computer Science and Engineering to research and prototype health technologies for low resource communities. This work will occur in conjunction with the newly awarded NSF project to create a Mobile Wellness Toolkit and with the CSE undergraduate senior capstone class taught by Richard Anderson and Ruth Anderson in spring 2012.
HCDE and CSE students will meet once a week together in Winter 2012 to work on project scoping, performing user research, and assessing the technology landscape for projects related to low resource communities in the Seattle area and internationally. Students are encouraged to continue their participation into Spring 2012 when the CSE students will be turning the project ideas into prototypes as part of their capstone projects. HCDE team members would then provide design input, perform evaluation and user testing, and work on UI. You can enroll for only one quarter, but students are encouraged to participate in the entire design process. Both undergraduates and graduate students are welcome.
In Winter quarter the class will meet Wednesdays from 4–5:50 pm. Students should expect to enroll for 2–3 credits. Undergraduate students must have completed HCDE 417, HCDE 418, or HCDE 419. If you'd like more details, we'll be holding an information session at 5pm on Thursday, Dec 8, in CSE 203.
This should be an exciting opportunity to work on projects with real impact. We've done similar collaborations for the past three years and it has been very successful. Each year, we have had projects that have gone all the way to real deployments and have resulted in publications in research workshops and conferences, as well as successful grant applications.
For an add code, contact Beth Kolko at bkolko@uw.edu.

Beth Kolko
Collecting and Visualizing Difficult to Access Data
The purpose of this research group is to familiarize students with the processes and practical complexities involved in obtaining electronic data, both domestically and abroad, and to learn skills for visualization of social and economic data. While conducting online research, data that may initially seem public and easily obtainable may actually pose significant problems in locating. Some data, for example, may be accessible only through private corporations, hard to access portions in sites of international agencies (the UN website, for example, can be very difficult to navigate for specific data), or through contacting governments agencies directly. There is a significant challenge not just in collecting the data, but in visualizing and providing them in a format that other researchers can easily use.
As part of the research group, students will put to practice skills and techniques in collecting electronic data by assisting in a project titled Investigating the Social and Economic Impact of Public Access to Information and Communication Technology (IPAI), a five-year, $7.2 million research project sponsored by Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project is managed by telecentre.org in partnership with the Center for Information & Society at the University of Washington Information School.
Over the last decade, governments, international development agencies, foundations, and corporations have made significant investments to increase public access to information and communication technology (ICT), particularly in developing countries. As these investments continue to grow, questions are being raised about their social and economic impact, particularly:
  • What are the observable social and economic impacts of public access to ICT?
  • What is the magnitude of these impacts and how can we measure them?
  • What is the relationship between costs and benefits of providing public access to ICT?
The project will answer these questions using longitudinal and comparative research approaches. It will examine the impact of a range of shared, public access to ICT models, such as the provision of ICT in libraries and telecentres, as well as other models and innovations that will emerge over the next five years. The research will examine both positive and negative impacts on populations' well-being in the areas of employment and income, education, civic engagement, democracy and governmental transparency, culture and language preservation, and health, among others.
To this end, it is vitally important to know what data are currently available so research is not duplicated needlessly and data can be provided in a format useful to the study. As the research focuses on developing countries, locating much of this data may be tricky. Such data may include the number of Internet cafés in a country or the Internet literacy rate of populations. In addition, obtaining data that can help to put socio-economic indicators in perspective are also vital and equally difficult to obtain. Such data may include shape files for maps.
Throughout the research group students will learn skills for obtaining difficult to locate data, gain practice in recognizing reliable data, have the chance to collaborate with researchers in a multi-country research project, and be given the opportunity to work with and analyze the data they collect. It is expected that students’ work will directly contribute to and be incorporated into the IPAI project.  The result will be an enhanced understanding of the kinds of issues researchers face when collecting data and how this translates into better presentation and visualization designs for displaying data and making them open and accessible.
Students will be expected to carefully document on a wiki their progress throughout the project. In addition, other work will include an informal paper at the end of the quarter that summarizes the successes and failures of research processes, positive outcomes and dead-ends encountered when visiting websites and contacting sources, and any other observations. (Understanding difficulties is just as important as understanding best practices so students are encouraged to be as open and detailed as possible when discussing their progress.) In addition, students will be able to design a project that involves visualization or formatting the data they collect.
If students desire, they will have the opportunity to create additional outputs that may include research reports, publications, or conference presentations.
The research group will be taken as CR/NC. Students will have the option of signing up for between 2 and 5 credits. Meeting times are tba, but the group will meet at least once a week. The course is open to graduate students (TC 596) and advanced undergraduate students (TC 496) in any discipline.
The research group will have an instructional team. TC instructor of record will be Beth Kolko, and course instructors will be Araba Sey, Chris Rothschild, and Willem Scholten.

Beth Kolko
Digital Games Research Group
The Digital Games Research Group brings together people who are interested in games, gaming, interaction, community, underserved populations, and mobile devices. Our goal for the next several quarters will be to (a) research how games provide implicit and explicit messaging through play, (b) how to repurpose or redesign that messaging to further social impact goals, and, (c) testing and deploying games on mobile platforms in international and domestic contexts.
Our primary goal will be to develop and deploy at least two games that help further the goals of international and community development projects. The mobile platform is the most likely development environment, but we can also explore other alternatives, including web-based games and alternative reality games.
Students with gaming experience, design experience, and mobile development experience are all encouraged to join the group. In addition, we welcome students interested in international and/or community development.

Beth Kolko
Hackademia Spring Code Jam

This Spring, Hackademia is sponsoring a 2-credit, hands-on technical skills workshop for HCDE students coordinated by Beth Kolko, Alexis Hope, and Behzod Sirjani. We encourage both undergraduates and graduate students to join. We'll spend the quarter working together to learn HTML5 & Javascript, and we'll complete projects in small teams using these tools. Students should expect to take an active role in leading the direction of skills learned and projects attempted—this will be an open-ended, collaborative learning experience!

Students interested in participating are encouraged to enroll for HCDE 496 (for undergraduates) or HCDE 596 (for graduate students) for 2 credits.
For more information, contact Alexis Hope (alexishg@uw.edu) or Beth Kolko (bkolko@uw.edu).

Beth Kolko
Hackademia (Winter 2012)
Hackademia is an attempt to break down the “two cultures” problem by introducing students not from technical disciplines to technical skills through hands-on, informal activities that bypass traditional notions of expertise. The project draws from the ethos and mindset of hacker and maker communities.
For Winter 2012, Human Centered Design & Engineering Professor Beth Kolko is looking for students to join the Hackademia research group.
C.P. Snow once wrote about the "two cultures" problem, what he referred to as the "supposedly impenetrable barrier" that separates the humanities from the sciences. Snow went on to write: "One camp views the other as technical, narrow, not to say blinkered...while the opposing camp dismisses the first as ineffective, not to say irrelevant. The issue permeates the discussions of what constitute true science, how the educational system should be organized and what education should really be all about. It engenders resentments and jealousies."
Students interested in seeing how close we can bring Snow's two cultures together through a hands-on, collaborative learning activity are encouraged to enroll for HCDE 496 (for undergraduates) or HCDE 596 (for graduate students) for 2-3 credits. Students in the humanities and social sciences, who have limited (or zero!) background in science, engineering, or other technical areas are enthusiastically encouraged to apply.
We'll build something during the quarter, but I don't know what it is yet. In past quarters, student groups assembled a 3-D printer, worked on an interactive story, and created wearable technology. We’ll also create some videos that introduce non-experts to how and why to use different tools (everything from a hammer to blinky LEDs). There is also room to investigate other questions that you find interesting in this general area.
Things I can say with certainty: you should expect to learn new things, and to keep track of how and what you learn through the quarter. This is a participant-observer kind of research project. I'll explain what that means at our first meeting. Technical skills required include: the ability to email.

Beth Kolko
Understanding Health in Diverse Communities: The Role of Cooking, Food Choices, and Traditional Recipes
South King County is one of the most diverse regions in the country, but its residents have some of the lowest health outcomes in the county, including high rates of diabetes. Effective interventions for promoting diabetes management or prevention must be culturally appropriate and grounded in understanding what specific challenges these communities face.
This quarter, we will do some readings, identify communities, and go out to the field to investigate attitudes and health behaviors specifically surrounding food. We'll go to the places where people shop and learn how people cook or provide food for their families. We’ll also explore cross-generational and cross-cultural issues related to food.
This work is tied to a larger project in HCDE and CSE that is working to create community-generated videos about healthy behaviors and diabetes management. The work of this research group will be able to inform that larger project.
Students interested in learning more about ethnographic methods and qualitative research are encouraged to join. If you are interested, please send an e-mail to Robert Racadio (racadio@uw.edu) and Beth Kolko (bkolko@uw.edu) with a brief statement describing your interest in the research group and any experience you have in conducting field research. We will meet on Wednesdays from 12:30PM–1:20PM in Sieg 420.

Beth Kolko
Designing Technologies for Resource-Constrained Environments (Winter 2013)
This is a new research group being offered in Winter 2013 on Wednesdays from 4–5:50, leading up to HCDE 419 Concepts in HCI which will be taught by Professor Starbird in Spring 2013. The winter quarter research group will be led by a team including HCDE faculty Kate Starbird and Beth Kolko and CSE faculty Gaetano Borriello and Ruth Anderson. [This is a slightly different form for the HCDE-CSE collaboration around 419 and CSE capstone that has been running for several years.]
In this Winter Directed Research group, HCDE and CSE students will meet together to develop project ideas for technologies specifically designed to meet social impact needs, such as addressing the needs of low resource communities (in the Seattle area and internationally) or designing for disaster and/or humanitarian response. Activities will focus on project scoping, performing user research, and assessing the technology landscape (mobile phones, tablets, embedded sensors, cloud services, SMS, etc.).
****If you'd like more details, we'll be holding an information session at 5pm on Thursday Nov 8th in CSE 303. We'll be outlining some initial ideas for this year's projects.**
In Spring quarter, the projects begun in the research group will form the basis of HCDE 419 which is a 5-credit class that will be paired with the 5-credit CSE481K capstone project course The Spring course is for HCDE students to take the ideas developed in Winter and work with CSE students to actually realize a working prototype and complete preliminary evaluations. HCDE 419 is a more traditional course with HCI-focused readings and assignments, and also project-based milestones, demos, and some presentations. We work hard to ensure that projects get connected to real customers who can provide feedback to the development team. The intent is that groups of CSE and HCDE students formed in Winter quarter will continue on to work together in Spring quarter (although there is always some shuffling in that not all students continue on in Spring quarter and some students will enroll in 419 who won't have been in the Winter research group.)
The primary audience for the group is undergraduates, although interested graduate students are welcome to attend.
** If you intend to take HCDE 419 in Spring 2013, we encourage you to sign up for this 2-credit research group that will meet Wednesdays from 4-5:50. **
Projects that have come out of similar collaborations include: low-cost milk banking for HIV positive mothers, low-cost ultrasound, converting paper records to digital form, visualizing vaccine cold-chain inventories, and creating health videos for south Seattle immigrant communities. If you have any questions, please contact Kate at kstarbi@uw.edu or Beth at bkolko@uw.edu.
More information about research in this area on campus can be found at: http://mwt.cs.washington.edu/ and change.washington.edu.We've done this for the past five years and it has been very successful. Each year, we have had projects that have gone all the way to real deployments and publications in research workshops or conferences.
Here are a few sample projects:
  • StarBus: SMS based vehicle tracking targeting public transportation in Kyrgyzstan. R. Anderson, A. Poon, C. Lustig, W. Brunette, G. Borriello, B. Kolko. Building a Transportation Information System using only GPS and Basic SMS Infrastructure, ICTD 2009.
  • Multilearn: Multi-input device educational games for elementary education in India. C. Tseng, S. Garg, H. Underwood, L. Findlater, R. Anderson, J. Pal. Examining emergent dominance patterns in multiple input based educational systems, IDID 2010.
  • Midwives' ultrasound. Developed an interface for antenatal ultrasound for use by rural midwives in Uganda. W. Brunette, W. Gerard, M. Hicks, A. Hope, M. Ishimitsu, P. Prasad, R. Anderson, G. Borriello, B., Kolko, R. Nathan. Portable Antenatal Ultrasound Platform for Village Midwives, ACM DEV 2010.
  • Milkbank: Developed low-cost milk banking for HIV positive mothers. R. Chaudhri, D. Vlachos, J. Kaza, J. Palludan, N. Bilbao, T. Martin, G. Borriello, B. Kolko, K. Israel-Ballard. 2011. A system for safe flash-heat pasteurization of human breast milk, NSDR 2011.
  • Low-power Sensors and Smartphones for Tracking Water Collection in Rural Ethiopia. R. Chaudhri, R. Sodt, K. Lieberg, J. Chilton, G. Borriello, J. Cook, Y. Masuda. IEEE Pervasive Computing (special issue on Pervasive Information and Communication Technologies for Development – ICT4D), Vol. 11, No. 3, July-September 2012.
  • Digitizing Paper Forms with Mobile Imaging Technologies. N. Dell, N. Breit, T. Chaluco, J. Crawford, G. Borriello. ACM 2nd Annual Symposium on Computing for Development (DEV), Atlanta, Georgia, March 2012.

Beth Kolko
Socio-cultural Aspects of Maker and Hacker Cultures, Part 1 (Autumn 2013)
The rise of public sites for customizing and configuring one's own environment (makerspaces, hackerspaces) is changing how we see products and technologies in our world. This group will tackle socio-cultural issues of self, thing, and environment and their relationship to design and technology development in light of these changes. We'll also question patterns of consumption and production in a world that increasingly accommodates mass customization. Theoretical framings and hands on activities will help organize our examination of these issues. Perspectives include readings from Suchman, (Judith) Butler, Haraway, and recent STS scholars. Additional fieldwork and community engagement will be part of our study and will help us articulate the socio-cultural-technical-political stakes of this project. Required to sign up for 2 credits. Group will meet Wednesdays 4pm-5:30pm in room 429 (TAT Lab). To request a seat in this group, please email both Beth Kolko (bkolko@uw.edu) and Daniela Rosner (dkrosner@uw.edu).

Beth Kolko
Socio-cultural Aspects of Maker and Hacker Cultures, Part 2 (Winter 2014)
Description: The rise of public sites for customizing and configuring one's own environment (makerspaces, hackerspaces) is changing how we see products and technologies in our world. This research will continue our work from last quarter tackling socio-cultural issues of self, thing, and environment and their relationship to design and technology development in light of these changes. We'll also question patterns of consumption and production in a world that increasingly accommodates mass customization. Theoretical framings and hands on activities will help organize our examination of these issues. Additional fieldwork, community engagement, and design interventions will be part of our study and will help us articulate the socio-cultural-technical-political stakes of this project.
Required to sign up for 2 credits. 
Group will meet Thursdays 4:30pm-5:30pm in room 429 (TAT Lab)

Charlotte Lee

Developing the Model of Coordinated Action (MoCA)

Winter 2017

Andrew Neang, PhD Student
Prof. Charlotte P. Lee

As computerized technologies and the practices they support continue to grow in diversity, ubiquity, complexity, and scale, the number and type of research topics related to the study of collaborative systems simultaneously continue to proliferate. It has become increasingly urgent to find ways to describe the problem space of practitioners and researchers in the Human Computer Interaction (HCI) field of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). If we are designing to support coordinated action we should know more about what coordinated action is and have better ways to talk about the variations among them.

In this DRG, students will be introduced to the Model of Coordinated Action or MoCA (Lee & Paine, 2015) and help the team further develop ordinal measures for the seven dimensions of this conceptual framework. This work contributes to Prof. Lee’s on-going efforts to further develop the overall theoretical framework and to build bridges between the framework and providing design guidance. As a group, we will conduct a retrospective content analysis of CSCW publications from over the past decade. Students will also work on identifying and presenting relevant literature for group discussion to help advance select dimensions of MoCA.

To get some background and details about the project, check out the HCDE Seminar Series talks here: http://www.hcde.washington.edu/seminar-series/lee

Our research group is looking for up to to 2 responsible and highly motivated individuals to join us for Winter 2017. In this project, successful students have generally had an interest in collaboration and organizations, a general interest in theoretical ideas and concepts, and are self-motivated. BS, MS, and PhD students are all welcome. However, given limited space we will be interviewing applicants. Students will enroll for 2-3 credits (CR/NC) unless with special permission from the instructor through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). This research group will meet once per week during the winter quarter for 1 hour and there will be one all-meeting that might be held on a weekend. Time and date is TBD. Students interested in this research group should contact Andrew Neang (neanga@uw.edu) with a statement about their interests and relevant background and/or qualifications.

Paper on Model of Coordinated Action (MoCA)

Comics Made By You: Reflecting on Vannevar Bush’s “As We May Think” 71 Years Later 
Autumn 2016

Prof. Charlotte Lee with Jeremy Kayes
 
Mondays, 6:30-8 p.m.
420 Sieg Hall
 
Comics can be a form of user experience design, of storyboarding and of technical communication. They can serve to convey complex ideas, concepts, and emotions in an accessible and sometimes profound way giving us the power to explore and tell stories. 

This is the third iteration of this DRG. In 2014, we drew comics describing and defining different aspects of Human Centered Design and Engineering. In 2015, we used comics to explore and explain the concept of the sociotechnical - what it means and why we study it. This year, we will draw our inspiration from Vannevar Bush’s 1945 article “As We May Think” that envisions, and in some cases predicts, the future of computing. Using that article as a touchstone, we will explore what it means to look forward, both then and now.

The goal of this directed research group is for participants to create and ultimately publish a collection of comics about the history and/or future of human centered design and computing. You do not need to be able to draw. If you can draw a stick figure, you can draw a comic. Depending on how fast you work and how many units you sign up for, 3 to 4 complete pages is a realistic goal for the quarter.
This DRG will be co-taught by Jeremy Kayes, author of the book The Indies and founder and organizer of the 5-year-old, 800 member, Seattle Indie Comic and Game Artist (SICAGA) Meetup group. Jeremy has a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Virginia Commonwealth University and works as a User Interface Developer.

Students will be responsible for buying their own art supplies and for getting access to Adobe Photoshop through UW resources, such as Odegaard Learning Commons, or by purchasing a license. We will discuss art supplies during the first class.

BS, MS, and PhD students are all welcome, but we are limiting participation to 10 students. Students will enroll for 2-3 credits (CR/NC) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). 

 


Charlotte Lee
Dealing with People Coming and Going: Turnover in Coordinated Action
Autumn 2016

Thursdays, 2 p.m. or 2:30 p.m.

425 Sieg Hall

We are looking for students for Fall 2016 to participate in a reading group/workshop that will help develop a part of a conceptual framework for the field of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), the Model of Coordinated Action or MoCA (Lee & Paine, 2015).

We will focus on one of the seven dimensions of MoCA: turnover. Turnover characterizes the rapidity and ease with which people enter and leave and leave a collaboration. Collaborations with low turnover may be characterized by stability, closed boundaries, and perhaps formally defined participant roles (e.g. student project groups). Situations of high turnover are found in more emergent collaborations characterized by mass participation, porous boundaries, and tolerance for rapidly changing membership (e.g. crowdsourced disaster response).

Turnover is an under-researched area. We will look at turnover as it has been analyzed in CSCW, HCI, and other fields such as organization studies, sociology, human resource management, churn prediction, and software development. We will also looked at related concepts such as barriers to entry, churn monitoring and prediction, turnover consequences, ethical leadership, change management, and emergent organizations.

The first part of the the DRG will involve a reading group and the second part of the course will involve students identifying and presenting relevant primary (e.g. informal interviews) or secondary materials (e.g. newspaper or journal articles) for group discussion. At the conclusion of the class we will synthesize our findings.

Paper on Model of Coordinated Action (MoCA) can be accessed these two ways:


 

Charlotte Lee
Conducting a User Study of Farmer's Markets
Come join us as we conduct a user study of low-income women with children who frequent a farmer’s market in King County. This study will inform potential designs that will facilitate connections between small, local food producers and local consumers who want and need access to fresher, healthier foods. Our goal is to help promote small, local farms, and to encourage a local food system that is environmentally responsible and promotes food justice.
For Spring quarter, we will begin with a crash course on the qualitative research methods where students will learn how to interview people and how to conduct participant-observation research, such as shadowing people as they shop. Students will gain practical experience collecting, transcribing, and organizing qualitative research data. We are looking for motivated BS, MS, and PhD students.
In the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), the area of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) is increasingly looking at larger and more complex systems. But one type of system that seems to deserve more attention is the food system. Food systems include an amazing variety of things from seeds and soil, to tractors, to farmers and their communities, to consumers and their communities, to people, businesses and factories that grow, package, process, distribute, or consume food. More abstract things like culture and policies can be part of a food system too. Farmer's markets are one part of a larger food system, but are a promising place to start working towards improving sustainable and healthy food practices.
Participants in this research group will enroll for 3-5 credits (CR/NC) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). This research group will meet once per week during the Winter quarter. Time is TBD but it will be sometime Monday through Thursday between 10am and 4pm. Students interested in this research group should email Prof. Charlotte Lee (cplee@uw.edu) by March 17. In your email, please tell me what your interest is in the topic and what experience you may have conducting user studies.
Prerequisite: Students should read the first 5 chapters of Oran Hesterman's book Fair Food: Growing a Healthy Sustainable Food System for All by the end of the first week of Spring quarter. It is a quick read.

Charlotte Lee
Comics Made By You: Human Centered Design & Engineering for Everyone
Prof. Charlotte P. Lee, Computer Supported Collaboration Laboratory
(with Jeremy Kayes)
Comics can be seen as a form of user experience design. In 2006, Scott McCloud, author of Understanding Comics gave the closing plenary talk for the ACM SIG CHI Conference on Human-Computer Interaction to talk about the purpose, visual formats, and structure of comics. Comics can be used as a way to convey complex ideas, concepts, and emotions in an accessible and sometimes profound way giving us the power to explore and to tell stories. For this DRG we will tell stories about what it means to do Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE).
The goal of this directed research group is for the members of the group to create and ultimately publish a collection of comics about HCDE broadly construed. For example, we might expect BS students to draw comics about their experiences learning about HCDE and doing internships, MS students to draw about their favorite projects or professional experiences, and PhD students to take on the grand challenge of turning their research in to comics. You do not be able to draw. If you can draw a stick figure, you can draw a comic. Depending on how fast you work and how many units you sign up for, 3 to 6 complete pages is a realistic goal for the quarter.
We will be joined this quarter by Jeremy Kayes, author of the book The Indies and Founder and Organizer of the 3-year-old, 520 member, Seattle Indie Comic and Game Artist (SICAGA) Meetup group. Jeremy has a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Virginia Commonwealth University and works as a User Interface Developer.
Students will be responsible for buying their own art supplies and for getting access to Adobe Photoshop through UW resources, such as Odegaard Learning Commons http://www.washington.edu/itconnect/learn/technology-spaces/odegaard-learning-commons or by purchasing a license. We will discuss art supplies during the first class.
BS, MS, and PhD students are all welcome, but we are limiting participation to ~10 students. Students will enroll for 2-3 credits (CR/NC) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). This research group will meet once per week during the Fall 2014 quarter on Thursday evenings from 6 to 7:30pm starting October 2. Location is TBD.
Interested students should email Prof. Charlotte Lee (cplee@uw.edu) no later than Tuesday, September 24th, 2014Please write a short paragraph about why you want to be invited to join this group and jot down at least 2 ideas about what you might like to do a short comic about (You can change your mind later).  We anticipate that admission will be competitive.

Charlotte Lee
Designing a User Study of Farmer's Markets: What do Growers and Eaters Want?
Our research group is looking for highly motivated group members! BS, MS, and PhD students are all welcome but this group is limited to 6 students. This research group is a follow-on to a Fall Directed Research Group in which we read the book Fair Food: Growing a Healthy Sustainable Food System for All by Oran B. Hesterman. As a group, we have decided to undertake a user study of growers and eaters who frequent farmer’s markets in King County. This study will inform potential designs that will facilitate connections between small, local food producers and local consumers who want and need access to fresher, healthier foods. Our goal is to help promote small, local farms, and to encourage a local food system that is environmentally responsible, and that benefits local communities.
However, before we can collect data, we must first design the study and fulfill institutional requirements to conduct research at the University of Washington. For Winter quarter we are going to design and set up a user study. This Winter quarter we will do some literature review, negotiate entrée, design the study, and submit the required paperwork to the University of Washington's Human Subjects Review Board.
In the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), the area of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) is increasingly looking at larger and more complex systems. But one type of system that seems to deserve more attention is the food system. Food systems include an amazing variety of things from seeds and soil, to tractors, to farmers and their communities, to consumers and their communities, to people, businesses and factories that grow, package, process, distribute, or consume food. More abstract things like culture and policies can be part of a food system too. Farmer’s markets are one part of a larger food system, but are a promising place to start working towards improving local access and awareness.
Participants in this research group will enroll for 1-2 credits (CR/NC) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). This research group will meet once per week during the Winter quarter. Time is TBD but it will be sometime Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday between 10am and 4pm. Students interested in this research group should email Prof. Charlotte Lee (cplee@uw.edu) by January 4, 2013. In your email, please tell me what your interest is in the topic and what experience you may have conduct user studies.
Priority will be given to students who indicate an interest in continuing on with the group Spring quarter to participate in data collection and preliminary analysis. You need not have participated in the previous, Fall, research group to participate but students should have read the first 5 chapters of Oran Hesterman's book Fair Food by the end of the first week of Winter quarter.

Charlotte Lee
Food! Reading Group on Sustainable Food Systems
In the research group we will talk about food and food systems and read and discuss one book over the course of the quarter: Fair Food: Growing a Healthy Sustainable Food System for All by Oran B. Hesterman. Our goal is to acquire a basic understanding of what food systems are and to think about food systems as a potential design space for our field.
In the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), the area of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) is increasingly looking at larger and more complex systems. For example, a lot of recent research has focused on larger scale information infrastructures used by a lot of different people with a lot of different priorities—different stakeholders. In related areas such as Ubiquitous Computing, much attention has been paid to power systems, especially local consumption, for example electricity use in the home. But one type of system that seems to deserve more attention is the food system.
Food systems include an amazing variety of things from seeds and soil, to tractors, to farmers and their communities, to consumers and their communities, to people, businesses and factories that grow, package, process, distribute, or consume food. More abstract things like culture and policies can be part of a food system too. Food systems are everywhere! We need food to survive and we also enjoy it for pleasure. Food is a part of our lives. In order to have food in our lives, almost all of us rely on a food system or multiple food systems. What might be some ways that HCDE could get involved in food system? Maybe we can come up with some ideas!
After the first week, two students will lead discussions of chapters of the book. Discussion leaders will be expected to write and share a half to three-quarters page, single-spaced text discussion prompt including a brief summary of that week's reading and 3 prompts for discussion and one other discussion prompt that could be a website for an organization, flier, photograph, food, or some other object.
Our research group is looking for highly motivated group members that are committed to doing the reading every week and committed to learning about food! BS, MS, and PhD students are all welcome but this group is limited to 7 students. Participants in this research group will enroll for 2-3 credits (CR/NC) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). This research group will meet once per week during the Fall 2012 quarter on Mondays at 4 PM. Students interested in this research group should email Prof. Charlotte Lee (cplee@uw.edu) by September 24, 2012.

Charlotte Lee
Creating a Resource to Map the HCDE Design Theory Landscape
One of the defining elements of any field is the body of theory on which it relies. Our Department name, Human Centered Design & Engineering, is not directly affiliated with a particular field. However, HCDE is affiliated with a number of fields such as HCI and the area of study called Sociotechnical Systems. What might a body of theory for HCDE look like?
This group will be partly a reading group, although our mission for this quarter is to produce a useful reference for the HCDE community and beyond. Our research group will survey the landscape of design theory readings that are currently most relevant to HCDE and to develop a general understanding of the relationships among them. We will produce annotated bibliographies and information structures that will help motivate and contextualize the larger undertakings of HCDE and related research from the standpoint of theory. The depth and breadth of our survey will be partially determined by the number of research group participants.
The approximate schedule for the focus of each week is as follows:
Weeks 1–5: Read far and wide. Assemble lists and agree upon a desirable level of annotation.
Weeks 6–7: Synthesize and structure what we've read. Create structure such as timeline.
Weeks 8: Design the online reference
Weeks 9–10: Execute design
Our research group is looking for highly motivated group members to join us Spring of 2012. Students at the PhD, MS, and BS level are welcome to contact the instructor to be considered for enrollment.
Participants in this research group will enroll for 3-4 credits (CR/NC) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). This research group will meet once per week for 1 hour. Time and date is TBD. Students interested in this research group should email Prof. Charlotte Lee (cplee@uw.edu) by Thursday, March 8. Please note that admittance to the group is competitive and we ask that applicants submit a formal application including a resume or CV and a brief cover letter with a description of their background, interest in the research topic, and particular skills and experience.

Charlotte Lee
Reading Group on Scientific Cyberinfrastructures and Emergent Systems
Science is often at the forefront of technological use and development. New technologies and practices that start within the milieu of scientific research often propagate to industry and to everyday users. Looking at new technology and development issues in science is a way to peek into the future.
The study of large-scale advanced computational infrastructures (cyberinfrastructure) development and use for scientists, also known as e-Science and e-Research, is a growing area of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). The advent of new technologies ranging from simple social media applications to high performance computation have changed the landscape of how research can be conducted and what research questions are now answerable. This changing landscape is challenging for CSCW. How do scientists collaborate with each other today? How do scientists want to be able to collaborate next year? Or in ten years? How can we support the design of increasingly complex, long-term, and multidisciplinary collaborations? How do we design information systems and tools that work for current practice and that can also enable previously unachievable breakthroughs.
This group will be a reading group focused primarily on the budding cyberinfrastructure literature, but may also include related literature on topics that may or may not be specifically scientific in nature such as social media and crowdsourcing, data sharing, collaboration and teamwork, scientific computing, and emergent or complex systems.
After the first week, students will lead discussions Our primary goal for this group is to have a grasp on the latest cyberinfrastructure literature and to have developed a solid conceptual understanding of some of the pressing issues in the field. We will produce annotated bibliographies and literature reviews that will help motivate and contextualize the larger undertakings of the CSC Lab.
Our research group is looking for highly motivated group members to join us autumn of 2010. Reading groups being what they are, you should not sign up for this research group unless you are committed to doing the reading every week, participating in discussion, and providing deliverables on time. This research group is geared towards doctoral students. However, highly motivated MS and BS are welcome to contact the instructor to be considered for enrollment.
Participants in this research group will enroll for 2-4 credits (CR/NC) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). This research group will meet once per week during the Fall 2011 quarter on Tuesdays from 4:00 – 5:00pm.  Students interested in this research group should email Prof. Charlotte Lee (cplee@uw.edu) by September 16, 2011. Please note that admittance to the group is competitive and we ask that applicants submit a formal application including a resume or CV and a brief cover letter with a description of their background, interest in the research topic, and particular skills and experience.

Charlotte Lee
Investigating the Role of Online Calendar Use in the Cultivation and Maintenance of Relationships
Modern OCS, such as Google Calendar, evolved from early groupware systems used in organization-specific, professional environments. Today, software supporting all manner of collaboration has been adopted for use in non-professional settings. Our earlier exploratory research investigated how activities and relationships are supported and constrained by OCS. We found that, as with other types of work, relationship work entails particular concerns and practices that are very much reflected in both the motivations and use of OCS.
However, too little is known about the role of calendaring in the cultivation, maintenance, and dissolution of friendships and romantic relationships. This research group will focus on exploring this topic with a demographic survey and semi-structured interviews. Using a grounded theory approach, we will generate a conceptual framework that accounts for our research questions. Data collection will be undertaken at subjects' homes, in our laboratory, and in areas around the UW campus.
This is a hands-on research group where students will help the Director and Research Assistants (RAs) with conducting interviews, analyzing data sets comprised of interviews and observation notes, coding data, and more. As students will be conducting with study participants and working with actual interview research data, discretion is a requirement for participation.
Our research group is looking for highly motivated group members to join us Winter and Spring quarter of 2011. Top candidates will have experience coding qualitative data, conducting interviews, and acquaintance with the field of CSCW (computer supported cooperative work). There is a minimum commitment of 2 consecutive quarters of participation; exceptions may be made for graduating students who can commit to a minimum of 3 credits in 1 quarter.
Participants in this research group will enroll for 2-5 credits (CR/NC) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). This research group will meet once per week during the Winter 2011 quarter on Wednesdays from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM.
Students interested in this research group should contact Charlotte Lee (cplee@u.) and Alex Thayer (huevos@u.) by December 17, 2010. Please note that admittance to the group is competitive and we ask that applicants submit a formal application including a resume and a cover letter with a description of background, interest in the research, and particular skills. Alex or another RA will follow up and conduct a phone interview to assess your interest and skill set.

Charlotte Lee
Scientific Cyberinfrastructures and e-Research: Surveying the Literature
Science is often at the forefront of technological use and development. New technologies and practices that start within the milieu of scientific research often propagate to industry and to everyday users. Looking at new technology and development issues in science is a way to peek into the future.
The study of large-scale advance computational infrastructures (cyberinfrastructure) development and use for scientists, also known as e-Science and e-Research, is a growing area of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). The advent of new technologies ranging from simple social media applications to high performance computation have changed the landscape of how research can be conducted and what research questions are now answerable. This changing landscape is challenging for CSCW. How do scientists collaborate with each other today? How do scientists want to be able to collaborate next year? Or in ten years? How can we support the design of increasingly complex, long-term, and multidisciplinary collaborations? How do we design information systems and tools that work for current practice and that can also enable previously unachievable breakthroughs.
This group will be a reading group focused on the budding cyberinfrastructure literature. The first few weeks will be designated for assigned readings that all students will read. During the remaining weeks students will lead discussions. If there are enough participants, we may split up into topical subgroups. Our primary goal for this group is to have a grasp of the latest cyberinfrastructure literature and to have developed a solid conceptual understanding of the pressing issues in the field. We will produce annotated bibliographies and literature reviews that will help motivate and contextualize the larger undertakings of the CSC Lab.
Our research group is looking for highly motivated group members to join us autumn of 2010. Reading groups being what they are, you should not sign up for this research group unless you are committed to doing the reading every week, participating in discussion, and providing deliverables on time. This research group is geared towards doctoral students. However, highly motivated MS and BS may contact the instructor to be considered for enrollment.
Participants in this research group will enroll for 2-5 credits (CR/NC) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). This research group will meet once per week during the Winter 2010 quarter on Wednesdays from 4pm to 5pm.
Students interested in this research group should contact Charlotte Lee (cplee@uw.edu) by September 15, 2010. Please note that admittance to the group is competitive and we ask that applicants submit a formal application including resume and a cover letter with a description of their background, interest in the research, and particular skills.

Charlotte Lee
Computer Supported Collaboration
How do we cooperate through computerized tools? How does computerization change the way we interact with our workmates and our friends? How does computerization change the way science is done? This research group will look at particular instances of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) to understand aspects of how our lives as social beings interweave with our technology-filled world.
This research group will focus on topics in Computer Supported Cooperative Work. This is a hands-on research group where students will help the Director with ongoing research projects including: studying the social aspects of online calendar sharing, evaluating and analyzing the adoption and use in a Amazon Kindle DX pilot study for the academic environment, and analyzing data sets comprised of interviews and observations. Data sets that need to be analyzed may include interviews with biologists, ecologists, bioinformaticists, computer scientists, engineers, or astronomers. As students will be working with actual interview research data, discretion is a requirement for participation.
Our research group is looking for highly motivated group members to join us winter of 2010. Students with experience coding qualitative data; a background in social science, computer science, or biology, skilled at analyzing texts, interested in the social study of science and technology; experience submitting IRBs, or who are Google Calendar or Kindle DX users are particularly encouraged to apply. There is a minimum commitment of 2 consecutive quarters of participation. Exceptions may be made for graduating students who can commit to a minimum of 3 credits.
Participants in this research group will enroll for 2-5 credits (CR/NC) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). This research group will meet once per week during the Winter 2010 quarter on Wednesdays from 4:30pm to 5:30pm.
Students interested in this research group should contact Charlotte Lee (cplee@u.) or Alex Thayer (huevos@u.) by December 14, 2009. Please note that admittance to the group is competitive and we ask that applicants submit a formal application including resume and a cover letter with a description of their background, interest in the research, and particular skills.

David McDonald

"That's not what I meant!" A Directed Research Group on Voice User Interactions (VUI) 

Summer 2016

During the last few years products have entered the market that feature voice based interaction. Voice based agents like Siri, Cortana, and Alexa promise a seamless style of interaction based on voice command or, very nearly, conversational interaction to understand the goals of the user and act on the user's behalf.

This DRG will focus on one specific device, the Amazon Echo, to explore the limits of voice interaction and design new possible interactions. The DRG will explore how to use the Alexa Skills Kit (ASK) API to expand the capabilities of Alexa to prototype new visions of voice user interactions.


Scott Miles

CoSSaR DRG: Human-Centered Design of a Post-Disaster, Rapid-Response Research Facility
Winter 2017

The University of Washington was recently awarded a National Science Foundation grant to create and run a post-disaster, rapid-response research facility. The award will fund user research, software development, equipment procurement, training, field assistance, and service evaluation to facilitate multi-disciplinary reconnaissance research teams seeking to understand the impacts of wind and earthquake events on natural, engineered, and social systems. The facility will offer equipment such portable LIDAR scanners, deployable accelerometers, mobile devices for social surveys, and drones outfitted with cameras and sensors that can measure damage at a centimeter scale. The center will develop software systems for transmitting, archiving, integrating, exploring, and visualizing the complex data collected by field researchers after disasters. These are likely to include a mobile field app to assess structural damage, a platform for mixed-media social data gathering, a smart phone app to facilitate citizen science, and a virtual reality environment for exploring 3D renderings of damaged structures.

The CoSSaR DRG will ensure that the new RAPID facility takes a human-centered approach to procuring equipment, developing software, designing workflows, and engaging potential facility users. Fall Quarter 2016, students focused on inspiration/immersion and initial ideation related to how social science and engineering researchers conduct post-disaster field work to collect perishable data. This quarter, students will focus on 1) refining prototypes and formal use cases, 2) creating a design-thinking based collaborative process model (e.g., agenda, facilitated activities) for conducting a large user research workshop in January, 3) assisting with workshop facilitation, 4) synthesizing workshop outcomes, and 5) using workshop outcomes for iteration. Students will work closely with Dr. Scott Miles in HCDE, as well as professors in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Evans School, and Applied Physical Lab.

If you are interested, please send an email to Scott Miles (milessb@uw.edu) describing your interest in the DRG, your level in HCDE (or other department), and why you want to participate in this research group.


Sean Munson

Technology Design & Development for Healthier Eating
Spring 2017

Healthy eating can be challenging for a number of reasons. Busy schedules, poor knowledge of healthy dieting, and temptation are just a few factors that contribute to an unhealthy diet. In order to better understand their eating habits and work towards a healthy goal, many people to turn technology to mediate their eating behaviors. This is helpful in promoting mindful eating, which subsequently leads to a healthier diet. However, many smartphone apps, such as MyFitnessPal, rely on meticulously detailed logs of a user’s diet and daily activity. We hope to mitigate this user burden by developing an app that introduces daily food challenges as a means of engaging the user and inviting them to be more mindful of their diet.

In this DRG, we are looking for two students interested in designing and developing an iOS app who have: 1) experience in visual/graphic design, and  2) programming experience with Ionic and/or Cordova (or willingness to learn Ionic quickly) and/or web backends. Students will also conduct user testing and assist in pilot studies for the project. The first half of the quarter will focus on design and development while the second half of the quarter will have a greater emphasis on user testing, piloting the app and study materials, and refining them in preparation for launching the study.

We expect students to register for 3 credits of HCDE 496/596.

 

Sean Munson

Youth mental health: a family-oriented approach
Spring 2017

DRG led by Professors Julie Kientz and Sean Munson, and PhD student Arpita Bhattachary

Teenage years and young adulthood are significant stages of transitioning through rapidly changing social dynamics, career pathways, and exposure to unfamiliar circumstances. Reduction in stress has many benefits in social and mental well-being for thriving, as well as in improving treatment outcomes for physical and mental health challenges. What strategies can help youth to cope with stressful situations and start leveraging skills and resources for developing resilience towards stressful events?  

Family members and caregivers can be supportive social resources accessible to most (but not all) youth and may also be a source of interesting social tensions for youth seeking to become less dependent. Risk taking and learning are important aspects of development, and not all events are predictable, avoidable, or can be under control of a parent.  How can stress and mental health be approached from a family perspective?

In this project, we will involve youth and their families in design activities to understand what they think should be the role of technology in helping them manage and mediate support under stressful circumstances.

Activities: We expect to sketch and brainstorm design ideas, design and conduct focus group workshops and interviews with participants, and analyze qualitative data. Readings and discussions will be based on what will help the team learn related work and relevant skills. We look forward to working with 2-3 students who have interest in the topic, have prior experience in conducting focus groups and analyzing qualitative data such as HCDE 313/418/518, and/or have worked on projects in mental health. Depending on progress, students may have the option to continue on this project after the quarter ends.

Caution: We expect study participants to describe situations and emotions that they find stressful. Students in the team will be exposed to data which may also involve narratives on adverse events or trauma. We will work together to be supportive of one another, however, if you are negatively triggered by such content, we encourage you to take necessary measures for self-care while engaging in the project.

Time: We will decide a time based on the team’s availability. All students participating in the DRG, must attend weekly meetings for 90 minutes. Work outside of the meetings will include reading, contributing to design of study materials, conducting focus groups, interviews, analyzing survey and interview results, and writing results to share. You can register for 1–3 credit hours in HCDE 496/596; for each credit you should expect to spend about three hours of work per week outside of meeting times.

 

Sean Munson, Julie Kientz
Epiphany moments: Understanding catalysts for health behavior change

What can we learn from people who are working towards or have achieved changes in their health behavior? Are there specific moments of “epiphanies” that motivated them to take steps towards positive health outcomes? Theories of behavior change and prior work suggest that many factors come into play to catalyze an individual’s process of behavior change, such as social pressure, increased self-awareness or self-knowledge, and lifestyle changes. In this DRG, we will aim to gain in-depth empirical understanding of these factors and explore if we can design technology to catalyze such motivators of behavior change for those who are not yet motivated to change.

Activities: We expect to work together on to design and conduct interviews, surveys, qualitative analysis, and brainstorming design ideas. Readings and discussions will be based on what will help the team learn related work and relevant skills. We look forward to work with 3-4 students who have interest in the topic and/or have prior experience in conducting interviews and analyzing qualitative data such as HCDE 313/418/518. Depending on progress, students may have the option to continue on this project after the quarter ends.

Sean Munson
Designing and Evaluating Tools for Presenting Diversity Online
The Internet gives individuals more choice in political news and information sources and more tools to filter out disagreeable information. Citing the preference described by selective exposure theory—that people prefer information that supports their beliefs and avoid counter-attitudinal information—observers warn that people may use these tools to access agreeable information and live in ideological echo chambers, increasing the polarization of different political groups and decreasing society's ability to solve problems. In this research group, we design and study ways to increase people's awareness of the bias in their own reading and to help them find more balanced or diverse sources of news.
Previously, colleagues and I have developed algorithms to select for more diverse news, as well as the Balancer extension for the Chrome browser. Balancer (http://balancestudy.org/balancer) reveals the lean of one's news reading and offers recommended alternative sources or stories.
In this research group, project options include:
  • Continuing to develop and improve the Balancer extension based on what we have learned so far, and possibly releasing the extension for Firefox.
  • Comparing and and improving algorithms that select diverse news content based on link, vote, or traffic data.
  • Developing new tools.
  • Studies of bias in search results.
Limited to continuing students or by permission. For this research group, you should be fairly self-motivated and self-directed. If you are interested in continuing through Spring Quarter (for 1–3 credit hours of credit/no credit grade in HCDE 496/596), please send an email to Sean Munson (smunson@uw.edu) with a few paragraphs describing why you are interested in continuing in the group, any specific project, your relevant skills, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.

Sean Munson
Patient-Provider Sharing of Consumer Lifelogs
Many people turn to smartphone apps to manage their health and wellness information. These data have the potential to make continuous and objective data available for clinical care, but prior research shows healthcare providers rarely engage with the data. Understanding both patient and healthcare provider perspectives and incorporate them into the design of data integration may be important but under explored.
In this quarter, we will analyze results of a patient survey to understand their experiences and needs to share the lifelog data with providers. We also plan to conduct some interviews with health providers and patients in preparation for an upcoming observational study regarding how both parties interact with lifelog data in clinical visits.
Skills: interested and/or have experience in conducting and analyzing qualitative interview results, especially with a focus in collaboration and communication.
Time: TBD
Notes: Limited to 3-5 students (Note: Currently at capacity). Attendance at all meetings required. Register for 2-3 credits, though we could discuss more if you are interested in taking a more active role in the project.
Interested in applying? Please email Sean (smunson@uw.edu) and Christina (cfchung@uw.edu) with a brief statement of your interest and expertise, as well as planned credits.

Sean Munson
Wins and false starts: Why and how do people stop self-tracking?
Several studies have examined how and why motivated individuals and early adopters track their finances, physical activity, music choices, and behaviors. Most people do not track forever — some stop after a few days, weeks, or months — but few studies have specifically examined why people stop. This quarter, we will use surveys and interviews to study why, how, and when people stop self-tracking. Is it too time-consuming? Did their device break? Did they learn all they set out to learn? We're going to find out! More details.
Autumn 2014 Meeting time: Tuesdays, 4-5:30pm, Sieg 128.
Winter 2015 Meeting time: Wednesdays, 4:30-6:00pm, Sieg 128.
Status: waitlisted
If you are interested in participating (for 1–3 credit hours of credit/no credit grade in HCDE 496/596), please send an email to Sean Munson (smunson@uw.edu) and Daniel Epstein (depstein@cs.washington.edu) with a couple of paragraphs describing why you are interested in continuing in the group, any specific project, your relevant skills, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.


Sean Munson
Technology Support for Health & Wellness (2013-2014)
Hundreds of applications—online, on phones, and on mobile devices—are available to help people manager their health and wellness. Despite this broad adoption in the marketplace, the extent to which they help people, and who they can most help, are not generally well understood.
In this quarter, we will continue the following projects:
  • 3GT: We are preparing 3GT (Three Good Things), an online positive psychology application, to support two online field trials. There are some minor design refinements and implementation required to prepare the application for these studies. Experience with Python (specifically Django), JavaScript, and HTML is a plus for this work.
  • A study of goal setting. Work on this project will involve supporting a laboratory study (recruiting, scheduling, and running participants) and an online field study (designing and piloting the study application), as well as analyzing and writing up the results. You may work on either the laboratory study, the online study, or both.
  • An exploratory study of how to improve sharing features in life logs. This will include formative surveys, designing prototypes, and online and/or in person evaluations of these prototypes.
Limited to continuing students or by permission. If you are interested in continuing through Spring Quarter (for 1–3 credit hours of credit/no credit grade in HCDE 496/596), please send an email to Sean Munson (smunson@uw.edu) with one to two paragraphs describing why you are interested in continuing in the group, any specific project, your relevant skills, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.

Sean Munson
The Internet and the 2012 Election
In this directed research group, we will take advantage of the 2012 US national election cycle to plan, conduct, and review studies. Potential topics include:
  • Understanding people's preferences for accessing political news and opinion online
  • The consequences of discovering friends' political preferences through social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter
  • Processes for correcting rumors or counterfactual political information when it appears online
  • Design and deployment of new tools for political news access and/or discourse
  • [your idea here]
For some background reading, please see references at http://www.smunson.com/teaching/election2012/. Because the quarter starts rather close to the election, participants will be expected to be fairly self-starting. The format of the research group will be weekly meetings, in which we present and critique each others' research plans and progress. On some weeks, we may also read a recent paper in this area and discuss it as a group.
To apply, please submit a *maximum* one page (single-spaced) research statement, describing a research question, motivating/related literature, and how you might study it, and a short summary of your skills and experience. You may submit this individually or in a group. This statement need not be perfect, but should give a clear indication of what you might want to study. If your proposed project requires skills beyond your own, be sure to say so. We will use these statements to form groups at the start of the quarter or earlier, and we will get going immediately.

Sean Munson
Social Applications to Support Health & Wellness
Time: Tuesdays from 4:00PM–5:00PM
(may be rescheduled if this is a conflict for too many interested students—you are interested but cannot make this time, please contact me anyway)
Hundreds of applications—online, on phones, and on mobile devices—are available to help people manager their health and wellness. Despite this broad adoption in the marketplace, the extent to which they help people, and who they can most help, are not generally well understood.
I'm interested in developing applications, particularly social applications, intended to improve two primary health and wellness outcomes and behaviors. The first is general feelings of happiness and meaning. Here, I draw Positive Psychology exercises and ask how they can be made stickier or more effective by building online and/or social versions of them; one such application is Three Good Things (3GT: http://www.threegthings.net/). 3GT has faced some adoption issues, and I hope that we can improve its design before launching a broader field trial. We also may choose to develop new interventions.
The second is physical activity, which can lead to improved mental and physical health. There, I've developed an iOS application (GoalPost) that helps people set physical activity goals, monitor their progress, and share their progress with friends. It's a bit of out date, and needs some work, and then I would like to use it as a platform to test a variety of persuasive features. If one or more students with experience developing for iOS can participate this quarter, we should be able to refine the design and prepare a new version for release.

Judy Ramey

Creating Digital Video Examples of Usability-Testing Best Practices
In this group, we will identify aspects of the typical usability test that present challenges to user researchers, investigate best practices for them that are being used by experienced practitioners, and create portfolio-style discussions and digital video examples of these problems/best practices for posting on the LUTE website. (Any material produced that is of sufficiently high quality to be posted on the website will be credited to the students who created it.)
The group will meet once per week to share results and discuss ongoing projects. The size of the research group is limited. People interested in participating should contact me (jramey [at] uw.edu) with a message explaining their interest in the group and what background and skills they could bring to the group. Students with some knowledge of video editing are particularly encouraged to apply. Participants in this research group will enroll for 2-5 credits (graded cr./no cr.) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students).
To join this group, you need to contact Judy Ramey no later than two weeks prior to the start of winter quarter.

Judy Ramey
UW IT Self-Service for Students
How can students use self-service to take care of their UW IT business? This research group will examine the potential of self-service in a university setting. (Note: We will not be looking at self-service applications in the classroom, but rather at self-service options for the "business" of going to school—finding out information, filling out forms, registering, etc.) Working with personnel from UW's Student Information Systems, Office of Information Management, we will do one or more of the following tasks:

1.  Develop personas of the major types of students on campus who might benefit from access to self-service applications.
2.  Develop scenarios of "student UW IT work" in context: What are the key interactions that students have to have with UW? What information do they need from UW, what tasks do they need to complete, and what decisions do they need to make? What settings are they typically in when they do this IT work?
3.  Define when and why students need to interact with a "live" person. Which IT tasks lend themselves to self-service and which do not?
4. Recommend what self-service applications to offer to students, in what format (stationary web or mobile, etc.); possibly create example low-fidelity prototypes.

Students interested in taking part in this Spring 2011 research group should email Judy Ramey (jramey@uw.edu)  by March 4th explaining why they are interested and what they believe they can contribute to the project.

Judy Ramey
Mobile User Research
Mobile applications present unique user challenges and specialized requirements for information access and display. Varying contexts, small screens with disparate display methods, alternative text entry techniques, and user expectations carried forward from the stationary Web all have significant impacts on the Mobile user experience. What can be done to improve the end user experience from a better understanding of "user intent" to more "mobile friendly" inputs and outputs?

Much effort has been spent making Internet sites and applications  available on mobile phones. Such efforts have had limited success due the challenges of both the mobile experience and the mobile business ecosystem. Original group research has included an in-depth study of mobile Internet data use aimed at understanding user behaviors and motivations. Researchers will have an opportunity to identify and recommend additional topics for exploration.

Topics will include:
  • Evaluation of existing research on selected areas of Mobile user input and display methods.
  • Analysis of research on unique requirements and expectations when searching in a Mobile context.
  • Use of Mobile devices in e-learning.
Researchers will have an opportunity to identify and recommend additional topics for exploration. To join this group, you need to apply for admission by emailing Judy Ramey no later than two weeks prior to the start of winter quarter. In your email, explain why you want to join the group, what skills you bring to the group, and what you hope to get out of participating in the group.

David Ribes

Exploratory Methods: Digital Ethnographies of Data Science
Spring 2017

Join us this spring for a DRG that will focus on contemporary data science projects. You will have the opportunity to choose from a variety of objects of study associated with the ‘Big Data Regional Innovation Hubs’ (BDHubs) and the ‘State of Alaskan Salmon and People'  (SASAP), two contemporary ventures that seek to transform the sciences in general, or the sciences of salmon.

Course activities will be hands-on and action-oriented. You will be asked to deploy ethnographically-informed methods and documentary analysis practices to explore, collect, and collate issues in the contemporary data science milieu. Occasional readings, relevant to the thematic focus of the group’s work, will be assigned as well.

The goal of these inventive methods is not to transform the projects to quantitative data, but to find ways of preserving some sense of the dynamic and textured qualities of ethnographic observation, while still communicating these understandings in compact ways to others. By the end of the quarter, students will be familiar with digital and trace ethnographic research methods, and communicating those kinds of findings. 

This is a 2-credit (CR/NC) research group offered to undergraduate (HCDE 496) and graduate (HCDE 596) students. 

 

David Ribes

Comics Made By You: Visually Communicating the Sociotechnical

Prof. David Ribes with Jeremy Kayes

Comics can be a form of user experience design, of storyboarding and of technical communication. They can serve to convey complex ideas, concepts, and emotions in an accessible and sometimes profound way giving us the power to explore and tell stories. For this DRG we will explore the heart of Human Centered Design and Engineering by conveying fun, funny and engaging comic-based narratives examining the concept of 'sociotechnical systems.'

The goal of this directed research group is for participants to create and ultimately publish a collection of comics about sociotechnical design, broadly construed. For example, we might expect BS students to draw comics about their experiences learning about HCDE, MS students to draw about their favorite projects or professional experiences, and PhD students to take on the grand challenge of turning their research in to comics. You do not need to be able to draw. If you can draw a stick figure, you can draw a comic. Depending on how fast you work and how many units you sign up for, 3 to 6 complete pages is a realistic goal for the quarter.

We will be joined this quarter by Jeremy Kayes, author of the book The Indies and Founder and Organizer of the 3-year-old, 520 member, Seattle Indie Comic and Game Artist (SICAGA) Meetup group. Jeremy has a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Virginia Commonwealth University and works as a User Interface Developer.

Students will be responsible for buying their own art supplies and for getting access to Adobe Photoshop through UW resources, such as Odegaard Learning Commons, or by purchasing a license. We will discuss art supplies during the first class.

BS, MS, and PhD students are all welcome, but we are limiting participation to ~10 students. Students will enroll for 2-3 credits (CR/NC) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students)..


Daniela Rosner

Design Workshop Planning for Menstrual Hygiene Technology Development
Spring 2017

Over the last decade, a range of activists, designers and entrepreneurs have identified menstrual hygiene technology as a mechanism for broad social and political change. This quarter-long research group will focus on planning for two participatory design workshops on this topic of menstrual hygiene technologies and public distribution of hygiene products. The first workshop is planned for June in Atlanta, GA and the second workshop is planned for July in Seattle with folks from grassroots organizations, city maintenance workers, designers and others. During the summer quarter, we will run a followup DRG to prototype some of the most exciting ideas generated in the workshops. 

To apply, please send your CV and a brief statement of objectives to sefox@uw.edu. We are specifically seeking students with an interest in participatory research methods and experience actively participating in or helping facilitate workshops or community meetings. Proficiency in visual design or logistics and event planning is a plus. We expect students to register for 2 credits of HCDE 496/596.

 

Daniela Rosner

Margaret Hamilton and the Core Memory Weavers: The Women Who Put Man on the Moon
Spring 2017

Throughout the first two decades of the Cold War, magnetic-core memory was the principal mechanism with which computers stored and retrieved information. The computers for the Apollo mission stored information in core memory ropes—threaded wires, passed through or around magnetized metal rings. NASA engineers nicknamed this hardware “LOL memory” for the “little old ladies” who carefully wove wires around the electro-magnetic ferrite cores by hand. The code, written by the trailblazing Margaret Hamilton, was made material by a team of master seamstresses outside of Boston.

In this DRG, we use this moment in engineering history to examine craftwork’s intellectual contribution to innovation — how craftwork becomes hardware manufacturing, and how hardware manufacturing becomes craftwork. Drawing on traditions of speculative, material and participatory investigation (Dunne and Raby 2013, Kerridge 2015, Knutz et al 2014, Galloway 2015, Haraway 2013), we do this in an interventionist project of integrative inquiry (Rosner forthcoming). Hosting a set of workshops in Seattle and the San Francisco Bay Area, we develop a collaborative quilt made up of core memory “patches” that materializes the work of Hamilton and the core memory weavers. Participants receive a “patch kit” comprising a simple metal matrix, beads and conductive threads (in place of ferrite core and wire). Attached to each matrix is a module that acts as a potentiometer, monitoring the conductivity of the matrix threads in order to keep track of the woven design. Once connected to power, the module sends a snapshot of the matrix to a central microcontroller driving an LED display. By weaving their own patches and collectively hanging them onto a charging panel, participants contribute a “bit” of memory that begins to fill out larger digital display with their design. Each patch simulates the collaborative weaving of both read-only memory (ROM) and random access memory (RAM).

With this project we explore the contributions of embodied, gendered forms of knowledge that allow innovators to imagine new ways of making. We use craft as a line of inquiry, with its intersections of theory and practice, activism and understanding, and intervention and insight. Our intention is to not only bring the work of women back into histories of innovation, but also use these processional histories to imagine our relationships to technology afresh — how we might live and be alongside technological developments complete with their ongoing knots and troubles (Haraway 2016).

To apply, please send your CV and a brief statement of objectives to dkrosner@uw.edu. We are specifically seeking students with physical computing or facilitation experience. Proficiency in event planning and archival research is a plus. We expect students to register for 2 credits of HCDE 496/596.

 

Daniela Rosner

Design Studies Reading Group

Offered with PhD student Sarah Fox

This reading group offers a means for graduate students from across the university to come together to explore key topics, debates, and theoretical perspectives in the field of Design Studies. Particularly of interest will be readings concerned with how design may preference the interests of certain groups over others and affect our ability to act.

Each week, we will meet for two hours to reflect on a book selection or 2-3 articles of interest. Those interested in pursuing design research, curation, and/or criticism are welcome.


Daniela Rosner, Sarah Fox, Cynthia Bennett
Feminist Theory & Critical Disability Studies Reading Group

This quarter-long reading group/DRG will examine and discuss readings that cover key and emerging themes in contemporary feminist theory and critical disability studies, alternating topics each week. We will grapple with gender and disability in their complex intersections with other systems of power, privilege, and access, including: class, sexuality, race, ability, and nationality. Rather than attempting to define a single conception of feminism or disability, we will instead consider various approaches taken up by past and contemporary feminist and disability studies theorists and activists. 

If this sounds of interest to you and you would like to participate, please reach out to Sarah Fox (sefox@uw.edu) or Cindy Bennett (bennec3@uw.edu). Sarah and Cindy are also happy to answer any questions you might have. 


Daniela Rosner
Materiality Reading Group

This quarter-long reading group/DRG will will examine and discuss papers on the topic of materiality from the fields of science and technology studies (STS), archaeology, and new media studies and will be guided by broad questions about the role of objects in our lives and practices. Our specific interests is to think of the agency and aliveness of things in the context of restoration, repair, and maintenance practices. The group is set in collaboration with Prof. Daniela Rosner (HCDE) and will meet Wednesdays beginning week 2 from 4:00-5:30pm in Sieg Hall 420. Participating students will have the opportunity to sign up for 2 credits and will be asked to help lead weekly discussions.
 


Daniela Rosner
Exploring the Feminist Internet of Things

While millions of people use sanitary pads and napkins, few public restrooms provide access to menstrual hygiene products, and even fewer provide them for free. As the average price per unit of tampons in the United States grows past $5.61, its availability to people with limited socioeconomic resources continues to decline. To address this concern, our team will explore the distribution of menstrual hygiene projects in public sites throughout Seattle. Through interviews and observations at places like parks and community centers, we will learn about the maintenance and usage practices that are currently in place. In tandem with and in response to this observational work, we will be making modifications to existing menstrual hygiene dispensers—namely, outfitting them with lightweight sensors so that the product levels might be better and more easily stocked. 

If you are interested in participating, please send an email to Daniela Rosner (dkrosner@uw.edu) and Sarah Fox (sefox@uw.edu) with a copy of your resume/CV and a short statement expressing your qualifications and interests in the group. A background in qualitative research methods (interviews, observation, probes) and/or hardware prototyping is needed. 


Daniela Rosner
Mapping Critical Design

What is critical design? What does it mean to use design to ask critical questions, enable new forms of civic participation, or respond to social change? What are the criteria by which we call something critical in the context of design projects and design programs? This DRG aims to help researchers interested in mapping the field of critical design. To do this, we will examine the current literature on critical design across human-computer interaction, science and technology studies, anthropology and media studies. We will also connect our work with with the physical computing projects in Davidson and Rosner's DDG this spring and invite practitioners and academics working in this area to participate in our conversations. Please contact Professor Rosner at dkrosner@uw.edu for registration information.

Daniela Rosner
Movement through Public Life
Our team will explore light as means of catalyzing new forms of creative engagement in underutilized public spaces such as dark stairwells or pathways. If you are interested in participating, please send an email to Daniela Rosner (dkrosner@uw.edu) with a copy of your resume/CV and a short statement expressing your qualifications and interests in the group. A background in qualitative research methods (interviews, observation, probes) and/or design sketching is needed. 

Daniela Rosner
Socio-cultural Aspects of Maker and Hacker Cultures, Part 2 (Winter 2014)
Description: The rise of public sites for customizing and configuring one's own environment (makerspaces, hackerspaces) is changing how we see products and technologies in our world. This research will continue our work from last quarter tackling socio-cultural issues of self, thing, and environment and their relationship to design and technology development in light of these changes. We'll also question patterns of consumption and production in a world that increasingly accommodates mass customization. Theoretical framings and hands on activities will help organize our examination of these issues. Additional fieldwork, community engagement, and design interventions will be part of our study and will help us articulate the socio-cultural-technical-political stakes of this project.
Required to sign up for 2 credits. 
Group will meet Thursdays 4:30pm-5:30pm in room 429 (TAT Lab)


Daniela Rosner
Socio-cultural Aspects of Maker and Hacker Cultures (Fall 2013)
The rise of public sites for customizing and configuring one's own environment (makerspaces, hackerspaces) is changing how we see products and technologies in our world. This group will tackle socio-cultural issues of self, thing, and environment and their relationship to design and technology development in light of these changes. We'll also question patterns of consumption and production in a world that increasingly accommodates mass customization. Theoretical framings and hands on activities will help organize our examination of these issues. Perspectives include readings from Suchman, (Judith) Butler, Haraway, and recent STS scholars. Additional fieldwork and community engagement will be part of our study and will help us articulate the socio-cultural-technical-political stakes of this project. Required to sign up for 2 credits. Group will meet Wednesdays 4pm-5:30pm in room 429 (TAT Lab). To request a seat in this group, please email both Beth Kolko (bkolko@uw.edu) and Daniela Rosner (dkrosner@uw.edu).

Daniela Rosner
Reimagining Design Tools: Research through Design
The work of design pervades and profoundly shapes our everyday lives. Over the last few years, new tools for personal fabrication and collective design - from graphic communication to architecture - have enabled new forms of creative practice. This DRG will focus on building tools that help us better understand these changes. Through ideation, hands-on prototyping and implementation, we'll pose several questions related to the functional (what can be built and how?) and the symbolic (what ideas and actions can these tools help legitimate, challenge or make possible?).
Desired skills: hardware prototyping (e.g. Arduino, vibration and dynamics, microphones and acoustic actuators), software programming (Arduino, Java), mobile application prototyping (e.g. iOS). 
If interested in participating, please email your qualifications to Professor Daniela Rosner at dkrosner@uw.edu.

Daniela Rosner
Design as Inquiry
This group will explore the design of novel interactive systems not for the sake of technology development but as a means of understanding social phenomena, from how artists use new technologies to create value and insight to how people engage public space to shape new modes of citizenship. 
We’ll need people with diverse skill sets:
  • Design: UX, IxD, UI
  • Software: Arduino, web, mobile
  • Electronics: digital & analog circuits
  • Mechanics: vibration and dynamics, microphones and acoustic actuators
For Winter 2015, we will focus on an exploration of three projects:
  • Research Study of Movement through Public Life: extend development of Trace, a GPS-based application that explores the potential of guided wandering, rather than directed navigation, as creative, public, and potentially political communication. A background in GIS and/or an interest in radical cartography and critical geography is a plus. 
  • Sound and Visual Fabrication: continue research investigating the design of an interface for carving sound waves into physical material.
  • Repair Research Study: use design interventions to examine mechanisms for enabling socially engaging repair practices (e.g., mends on tattered clothing).
  • If you are interested in participating, please send an email to Daniela Rosner (dkrosner@uw.edu) with a copy of your resume/CV and a short statement expressing your qualifications and interests in the group. Preference given to students willing to commit to 3 credit hours.

Daniela Rosner
FizzLab: A Directed Design Group
 
This group will explore physical computing as a platform for integrating tools used in and around making. Phys­i­cal com­put­ing is the blend­ing of hard­ware and soft­ware engi­neer­ing—using micro-controllers, pro­gram­ming, sen­sors, elec­tronic devices, wearable technology, etc—to build inter­ac­tive sys­tems and envi­ron­ments. The focus of this research group is to make real-world projects and tools by design­ing, pro­to­typ­ing, and engi­neer­ing phys­i­cal com­put­ing systems.
 
The group should be thought of as a Directed Design Group, rather than research-oriented. We will make things the way a small design con­sul­tancy oper­ates—in a cre­ative, prag­matic, nim­ble, and col­lab­o­ra­tive team.
 
Each quar­ter a project team will tackle a new design chal­lenge. Some chal­lenges may span mul­ti­ple quar­ters. We’ll need peo­ple with diverse skill sets:
  • Design: UX, IxD, UI
  • Software: Arduino, web, mobile
  • Electronics: digital & analog circuits
  • Mechanics: vibration and dynamics, microphones and acoustic actuators
For Autumn 2014, we will focus on an exploration of three technology projects for making, using Arduino micro-controllers with printed circuits. Three projects currently underway are:
  • Trace: a GPS-based application that explores the potential of guided wandering rather than directed navigation as creative communication.
  • Scratch-Hear: an augmented milling-tool for creating sound annotations in physical material playable by scratching surfaces.
  • Sow-What: a printer for designing socially engaging mends on tattered clothing.
Other making projects are possible, depending on the interests and ideas of the FizzLab participants.
If you are interested in participating, please send an email to Daniela Rosner (dkrosner@uw.edu) and/or Andrew Davidson (adavid7@uw.edu) with a copy of your resume/CV and a short statement expressing your qualifications and interests in the group. Preference given to students willing to commit to 3 credit hours.

Elizabeth Sanocki

Elizabeth Sanocki
High School Computer Science Education Research
Winter 2016

With a recognition of the importance of STEM education in high schools, there is a push nationally to teach computer programming in high schools. However, the high school teachers tasked with teaching computer science (CS) don’t have the tools they need to teach it effectively. Many are math or science teachers who don’t have strong backgrounds in computer programming. 

The UW CSE department has begun to repurpose some of its existing educational software to assist teachers.To do this effectively, UW CSE needs to better understand (a) what high school teachers need and how those needs can be addressed by software tools, (b) how they are using tools that currently exist.

In this research group, we will apply ethnographic research techniques to understand the needs and goals of high school computer science teachers. Then we will analyze the data and brainstorm solutions to recommend how best to meet those needs. We will assess the gap between the tools that exist today and what would be needed to provide maximum benefit for HS CS teachers. 

By the end of the quarter, the goal for the DRG will be to create a presentation outlining teacher needs and pain points and identifying opportunities to impact CS education in high schools. 

We are looking for several students with a background or interest in ethnography, who are each interested in between 2 and 5 credit hours of credit/no credit grade of HCDE 496/596. This group will meet weekly in the afternoon. 

If you are interested, please send an email to Liz Sanocki (esanocki@uw.edu) and Alex Miller (amiller@cs.washington.edu) with a few paragraphs describing:

why you are interested in the project your background in ethnography or other qualitative research, if any the number of credits you are seeking


Jan Spyridakis

Amazon Seller Experience Research
Spring 2017

Led by
Jan Spyridakis, Professor, HCDE
Mike Berg, User Experience Researcher, Amazon

Amazon’s Seller Support & Performance research and design team is interested in partnering with HCDE students to explore user needs and design concepts for a strategic project. This is the second quarter of our research group focused on this topic.

This quarter we seek to understand Amazon sellers in greater depth. What does their current experience with Amazon tools like? What are their pain points? What unmet needs do they have? What is working well?

In spring quarter 2017, students will conduct formative research to develop an understanding of users and their needs. We will conduct a survey and engage in structured user interviews. As time allows, we can explore other techniques such as cognitive walkthrough or benchmark usability studies. Deliverables will include:

An analysis of survey responses
A summary of user interviews
User personas
Presentation of a report to Amazon stakeholders

In future quarters, the research group may conduct competitive benchmarks, create mock-ups, run usability evaluations or A/B studies, and iterate on proposed designs.

Members of the research group will work with Product Management and Design teams, and will influence the direction of future design projects. The DRG team will have access to research labs and design studios.

Students interested in joining the research group for spring quarter 2017 should have an interest in applied research and data analysis. The group welcomes students with a desire to conduct user research and learn more about the topics described here. Additional desired skills include:

Experience conducting and presenting primary research
User profiling and persona creation
Experience with usability evaluations
Interest in sketching and prototype design solutions

HCDE undergraduate or graduate majors will participate in this research group by enrolling for 2–4 credits (graded cr/no cr) in HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). Students are expected to spend, on average, three hours of effort per credit per week (time spent includes the weekly meeting).

 

Jan Spyridakis

Spend that shortness: Exploring the limitations of a predictive machine learning interface

Mike Berg, Senior User Experience Researcher, Amazon
Jan Spyridakis, Professor, HCDE

An Amazon research and design team is interested in partnering with HCDE students to explore emergent design metaphors for information display. This research group will likely take place over three quarters.

Research questions will concern identification of dynamic interfaces that display information in contextual ways. We will explore issues with relying on machine learning to make judgments for content relevancy and question how successful an artificial intelligence is at deriving user intention.

In winter quarter 2017, students will conduct background research, conduct a literature review concerning existing contextual interfaces, create user profiles, and evaluate comparable interface designs. Our Winter Quarter deliverables will include:

  • A literature and competitive review identifying and evaluating existing contextual interfaces
  • Target user profiles
  • Usability evaluation of comparable interface designs
  • Presentation of a report to Amazon stakeholders

In ensuing quarters, the research group may conduct user research with Amazon sellers, create mock-ups, iterate on proposed designs, and run usability evaluations or A/B studies.

Members of the research group will work closely with Product Management and Design teams, and will have an opportunity to influence the direction of future design projects. The team will have access to research labs and design studios

Students interested in joining the research group for winter quarter 2017 should have an interest in conducting scholarly research to learn about contextual interfaces and machine learning, and in conducting usability evaluations of existing interface designs.

The group welcomes students with a desire to conduct academic and usability research and learn more about the topics described here. Additional desired skills include:

  • Experience conducting and presenting secondary research
  • User profiling and persona creation
  • Experience with usability evaluations
  • Interest in sketching and prototype design solutions

 

Developing a Toolkit to Remotely Assess the User Experience Remotely / WebLabUX Group
This research group uses the Internet to empirically study the effectiveness of electronically delivered information, and to develop tools that allow us to study users as they use electronically delivered information by measuring their behaviors, perceptions, and comprehension when they interact with information online. During the 2013–2014 academic year, we will be furthering the software development of our research toolkit, WebLabUX. Our group has done extensive user interface design in previous quarters, and the main focus for spring 2014 will be on refining and implementing the user interface.
The group welcomes web designers, prototypers, and programmers at all levels. Students with any of the following skills should apply:
  • PHP/MySQL coding of backend data collection infrastructure
  • User interface coding (HTML/CSS, JavaScript/JQuery, PHP)
  • Quality assurance testing
  • Web design and user interface prototyping
The group will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays from 4:30–5:30 PM in Sieg 420.
Individual user interface design and programming projects will be assigned during the first two weeks of the quarter. Students can participate in this research group by enrolling for 2–5 credits (graded cr/no cr) in HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). Students are expected to spend, on average, three hours of effort per credit per week (time spent includes the weekly meeting). Interested students should send a short email to Professor Jan Spyridakis (jansp@uw.edu) explaining their interest in the group and describing the strengths they can bring to the group.

Jan Spyridakis
Redesigning an Online Learning Resource
This research group will be redesigning about 50 online Flash exercises and a MySQL database for recording participant outcomes. We will also redesign the website that hosts the exercises. If time allows, the group may design additional exercises. At this juncture, it is likely that Flash is not what we will keep the exercises in and the research group will research and select a new authoring tool that will have good outcomes in multiple environments. Students with any of the following skills should apply:
  • MySQL 
  • Flash Professional or other authoring tools for elearning and mlearning (and willingness to help select an appropriate tool and learn it if needed) 
  • Web design and development skills (e.g., WordPress)
Students will enroll for 2–5 credits (graded cr/no cr) in HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students) or HCDE 596 (for graduate students). Students are expected to spend, on average, three hours of effort per credit per week (time spent includes the weekly meeting). Our meeting time is to be determined.
Interested students should send a short email describing their (1) interests, (2) relevant skills, (3) major, and (4) available meeting times to Professor Jan Spyridakis (jansp@uw.edu).

Jan Spyridakis
Assessing the User Experience Remotely / Open WebLabUX Group (Fall 2013)
This research group uses the Internet to empirically study the effectiveness of electronically delivered information, and to develop tools that allow us to study users as they use electronically delivered information by measuring their behaviors, perceptions, and comprehension when they interact with information online. During the 2013–2014 academic year, we will be furthering the software development of our research toolkit, Open WebLabUX. Our group has done extensive user interface design in previous quarters, and the main focus for fall 2013 will be on refining and implementing the user interface. The group welcomes web designers, prototypers, and programmers at all levels (e.g., Drupal theming, PHP, JavaScript/JQuery, HTML/CSS). Individual user interface design and programming projects will be assigned during the first two weeks of the quarter. Students can participate in this research group, which will meet on Tuesdays from 3:30–5:00 PM in Sieg 420, by enrolling for 2–5 credits (graded cr/no cr) in HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). Students are expected to spend, on average, three hours of effort per credit per week (time spent includes the weekly meeting). Interested students should send a short email to Professor Jan Spyridakis (jansp@uw.edu) explaining their interest in the group and describing the strengths they can bring to the group.

Jan Spyridakis
Documentation and the Popularity of Open-Source Programming Libraries and Frameworks (Fall 2013)
More and more software developers are using open-source software in their apps and writing open-source software for other developers to use. This research group will use quantitative methods to study open-source software for a variety of platforms and evaluate the role documentation plays in the success and popularity of the open-source software.
In this research group, you'll work with Professor Jan Spyridakis and Bob Watson, a PhD student in HCDE, to design the study, conduct the research, and analyze the data. The goal for the Winter quarter is to complete the research and write a paper for submission to a conference for presentation and publication. This will be a great opportunity for both graduate and undergraduate students to see, and experience, a complete research cycle first-hand. Students can participate in this research group by enrolling for 1– credits (cr/no-cr) in HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students). Students are expected to spend an average of three hours of effort each week per credit-hour. The research group will meet weekly for 1.5 hours and at other times as needed. The time and weekday of the group meeting will be arranged before the quarter starts.
Some familiarity with programming concepts and languages will be helpful, but is not required. For both HCDE and CSE students, this project provides the chance to learn about aspects that relate to the popularity of open-source software. Interested students should send a short email to Professor Jan Spyridakis (jansp@uw.edu) explaining their interest in the group and suggesting activities that they might like to undertake to contribute to the group goals.

Kate Starbird

Sketching a Field Guide to Contemporary Crisis Information Work
Winter 2017

Social media and other information and communication technologies are transforming how people communicate in times of crisis. In this directed research group we will be drawing on recent Human-Computer Interaction literature to make brief sketches (in words and otherwise) of contemporary crisis information workers, what they do, and how they do it. In this way, we will make contemporary scholarship more accessible for practitioners. 

Activities will include doing a close reading of selected academic research (about one reading per week). We will then synthesize what we learn in words and images aimed at practitioners.  

We are looking for students with a range of different skill sets and interests, including crisis informatics; information design; visual communication; and/or bridging the research-practitioner divide. 
Students may use this DRG as an opportunity to learn about contemporary communication in crises and/or develop writing or visual portfolio pieces. 

This research group will be led by PhD Candidate Dharma Dailey, with guidance from Assistant Professor Kate Starbird.

Interested students should send Dharma Dailey a resume/CV along with a statement about why you want to be involved and what you can offer to the team. Please mention both relevant past experience and experience you would like to gain. (ddailey@uw.edu

Kate Starbird
Tracking Information Flows across Social Media during Disaster Events

Autumn 2016

This research project examines how social media is used during disaster events such as earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, and acts of terrorism. Expanding upon previous work tracking online rumors, this quarter we will be investigating how information moves through and across social media platforms during disaster events. For example, we may track specific stories or pieces of information as they spread on Twitter, Reddit, Facebook and NextDoor.

Activities this quarter will include: literature review, defining research questions, data collection, and exploratory analysis of social media data. We will collate and summarize existing research in the crisis informatics field—especially studies that look at cross-platform use. From there, we will identify open and important research questions for our group to answer. At the same time, we will work to identify and collect data on emerging events—using existing infrastructure where we have it and building new infrastructure (collection software) where we need it. Once we have data and preliminary research questions, we will conduct exploratory analysis to begin to develop methods of answering our research questions.

We are looking for students with a range of different skill sets and abilities, including software development, data science, and qualitative content analysis. Students who are expert users of Twitter, Reddit and/or other relevant social media sites are encouraged to apply, as are students with programming experience in Python and MySQL.

Interested students should send Professor Kate Starbird a resume/CV along with a statement about why you want to be involved and what you can offer to the team. (kstarbi@uw.edu)


Kate Starbird
Increasing Motivation and Participation of Digital Volunteers/Crisis Mappers
During crisis events, thousands and sometimes millions of social media posts are shared by those in the affected area and observers around the world. These data could be very valuable to affected people and emergency responders, but to make them truly useful, we need better mechanisms of filtering, categorizing, and mapping individuals posts. One promising method for processing these data involves crowdsourcing - using volunteers in the crowd to help classify the data.
In this project, we will be experimenting with an existing system for categorizing and mapping social media posts that has been deployed during several crisis events. This project is a collaboration with the creators of that system. Using experimental methods, we will be examining the effects of different kinds of feedback on the motivations of volunteer crowd workers. 
We are looking for a small number of students to help with A) system design (for each of several experimental conditions); B) software development; C) data analysis and writing a final research paper. Students can take this DRG for 2-4 credits.
We will be building on top of the open source microtasking platform, PyBossa. Students should have web development experience and be comfortable using HTML 5; Javascript; JQuery; and Python or Java for the back-end. 

Kate Starbird
Tracking the Online Spread of Misinformation after Disaster Events

We are examining social media data to better understand how rumors spread after disaster events. Students can see descriptions of this work in past DRG announcements regarding research on the Boston Marathon Bombings. We have created (and continue to develop) an infrastructure to identify emerging crisis events, collect data in real time on those events, find rumors within that data, then "code" and analyze that data. In this large, collaborative project, we are pursuing a diverse set of research questions—e.g. looking at "correction" behaviors, tracking permutations, understanding "sensemaking" behaviors, exploring better models and metaphors to describe rumoring dynamics, etc. Student researchers can contribute by manually coding Twitter data, analyzing that data (qualitatively, quantitatively, and visually), helping to build automatic (machine learning) classifiers to detect misinformation, and writing up reports and papers from those analysis. 

We are looking for enthusiastic and dedicated student-researchers with a range of different skill sets and abilities who are willing to commit at least 9 hours (3 credits) per week to the project. 

Specific skills for new students in Autumn 2015: we are specifically looking for a small number of students with programming/development experience to help develop our social media data collection framework. For this aspect of the project, ideal students would be interested in user experience, social media, and web applications and would have experience with at least 3 of the following: Django, Django Rest Framework, Angular.js, Node.js, D3.js, PubSub patterns in a web context, and familiarity with Rest APIs.


Kate Starbird
Social Media Use & the 2014 Oso Landslide

Spring quarter 2015, the emCOMP lab will be analyzing social media concerning the the 2014 Oso Landslide, a recent mass fatality event in our region. Students will have the opportunity to work individually on analytical deliverables that may lead to publications in the context of an active collaborative research project. We are looking for one or two students to do a qualitative analysis of a key local information resource that made ample use of social media. We are also looking for one or two students with a bit of programming experience who would like to do some quantitive analysis of social media data. Ideal students will have an interest in this event, qualitative analysis of social media, and be self-motivated. This research group will be co-facilitated by two of Kate Starbird's PhD students user researcher Dharma Dailey and software designer John Robinson. If you are interested email us (ddailey@uw.edu and soco@uw.edu) with a few lines about why your interested and any related experience you have. Previous experience is not required. One weekly meeting and three hours of work per credit hour is required. Minimum 2 credit hours. 


Kate Starbird
Tracking the Online Spread of Misinformation after Disaster Events

We will be examining social media data to better understand how rumors spread after disaster events. Students can see descriptions of this work in past DRG announcements regarding research on the Boston Marathon Bombings. This Autumn Quarter, we will begin to focus on more recent events, including the bombing of MH17, hurricanes in Hawaii, and violence in Iraq.

We will be doing manual coding of Twitter data, big data analysis (qualitative, quantitative, and visual), and building automatic (machine learning) classifiers to detect misinformation. We're looking for students with a range of different skill sets and abilities, including qualitative coders, data scientists, and programmers with some experience using machine learning algorithms. Students who sign up as qualitative coders will have the opportunity to learn data science techniques (e.g. MongoDB, R, Tableau).

Interested students should send Professor Kate Starbird a resume/CV along with a statement about why you want to be involved and what you can offer to the team. (kstarbi@uw.edu)


Kate Starbird
Understanding Public Information Needs in Crisis Contexts

When a disaster strikes how will you get the information that you need?
How do emergency professionals reach the public?  
What are the prevailing information needs in a crisis? Are they all met the same way?
There are many challenges to getting information out to the public during a crisis. Crises are inherently unpredictable, often interrupting predetermined strategies for getting information to the public. People are also ever more diverse in terms of the communication tools and platforms that they turn to for information. Given these challenges, the Public Information Needs in Crisis Directed Research Group examines the current strategies employed to get information out during crises from two perspectives: official response operations and observed recent information sharing behaviors among the public.  
In Spring 2014, we'll use document analysis and informal interviews with domain experts to create a basic model of how the work of informing the public during crises is taking place for one locale in the United States. With guidance and support students will be responsible for conducting and documenting a portion of the analysis.
This research group will be run by HCDE PhD student Dharma Dailey and iSchool PhD candidate Beth Patin, and supervised by HCDE Professor Kate Starbird. If you are interested, please send an email to both Dharma (ddailey@uw.edu) and Beth (bethp@uw.edu) with a brief description of why you interested in the group, any relevant experience, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students. Students should register for 2-3 credits and are expected to conduct 3 hours per week of work outside the classroom for each registered credit.

Kate Starbird
Designing/Developing a Content Curation Web App for Disaster Volunteers (2014)
Disaster events have long been catalysts for pro-social behavior, and spontaneous volunteers are known to “converge” onto the scene to help, often by improvising solutions to unexpected conditions and gaps in response efforts. In recent years, people have begun to turn to social media after disaster events for a variety of reasons: locals use social media to seek and share information, emergency responders use these tools to communicate with their constituents, and remote individuals come together on these platforms to offer help of various kinds. Members of this latter group are sometimes referred to as digital volunteers. One of their primary activities involves curating—i.e. filtering, classifying, and synthesizing—the massive amounts of information available on social media during disasters, helping to make this information usable to emergency responders and affected people.
The primary focus of this directed research group is to understand the behavior of these digital volunteers and to develop tools that support their activities and goals. In preliminary design work, we have generated design ideas focused around a collaboration curation web application where multiple volunteers can filter and categorize social media posts (tweets, photos).
This is an ongoing project with a small, dedicated group of student-researchers. We have developed preliminary designs based on contextual interviews with several digital volunteers. We are now moving towards developing a web application based on our initial designs. We plan to continue with an iterative design-develop-test cycle where we complete user testing on the application at various stages.
The group has multiple, related goals:
  • To develop and deploy a web application to support the collaborative, connected work of digital volunteers
  • To better understand the phenomenon of digital volunteerism
  • To better understand how groups collaborate and coordinate online 
  • To publish research on digital volunteerism and online collaboration 
We are currently looking for a small number (2-3) of additional team members, primarily to help with the development of functional prototypes from our preliminary designs and to participate in user testing of these prototypes. Students will be able to sign up for 2-3 credits each, depending upon the amount of time they will be able to devote to the project.
Desired Skills:
  • web programming experience (e.g. Javascript, PHP, Ruby on Rails, other)
  • database experience (e.g. MySQL, MongoDB, other NoSQL database)
  • comfortable working as part of a team
If you are interested in applying to join our team, please send an email to Kate Starbird (kstarbi@uw.edu) that includes a statement for why you are interested in working on this project as well as a current CV/resumé. Please highlight your relevant skill sets.

Kate Starbird
Researching at the Intersection of Social Media and Disasters: Tracing the Spread of Misinformation after the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing (2014)
In recent years, disaster events have become catalysts for massive convergence online. After major events like the 2011 Japan Earthquake/Tsunami and Hurricane Sandy, hundreds of thousands—and in some cases millions—of users turn to social media platforms to share information and to collectively make sense of the event. This activity leaves a significant digital record that can be used to study and better understand mass convergence behavior during disasters as well as the role of these new technologies in our lives.
This research group will examine Twitter data collected after the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing. We collected over 10 million tweets during a seven day window beginning a few hours after the explosions, and we have gone back and captured all of the links in these tweets as well as the content of the linked-to webpages. As part of an ongoing research effort, we plan to examine this “big data” with a goal of better understanding the spread of misinformation during disasters. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, we will investigate the spread of rumors, the crowd work to identify suspects (that went awry), and several conspiracy theories that propagated through Twitter as well as the surrounding information space of the wider Internet.
We are looking for a small group of students with complementary skill sets to continue this research. We are looking for researchers with qualitative skills who will:
  • help develop coding schemes for our analysis
  • read and classify 1000s of tweets and web pages
  • write papers describing our methods, analysis, and findings
We are looking for researchers with quantitative skills who will:
  • make network graphs and other visualizations
  • implement machine learning algorithms to automatically classify tweets and links
  • complete statistical analyses on these data
For this latter group, the following programming skills are recommended:
  • Programming in a scripting language (Python, Ruby or another) 
  • Database programming (MySQL or MongoDB) 
Team members may contribute to either the qualitative or the quantitative/computational side of the project (or both!). Other important skills include: comfort working with a team and great communication skills (writing/presenting).
If you are interested in applying to join our team, please send an email to Kate Starbird (kstarbi@uw.edu) that includes a statement for why you are interested in working on this project as well as a current CV/resumé. Please highlight your relevant skill sets.

Kate Starbird
Collaborative Crisis Curation: Designing a Social Media Processing Tool for Emergency Managers
In this second quarter of a multi-quarter project, we will be continuing our work to design a collaborative platform for emergency managers to help them filter and organize the information streaming in from social media during crisis events. Emergency managers and disaster responders are increasingly turning to social media as a potential information source during disaster events. As they do this, they are faced with new challenges related to processing this flood of information, including finding strategies and tools to deal with the huge volume, noise, lost context, misinformation, etc.
In the Fall Quarter, we identified a research opportunity within this space and developed a research plan for designing a platform to help a virtual group of emergency managers track global events using social media. This quarter, we will continue the human-centered design process, moving from user studies to prototyping of our new tool. Our end-goals for the quarter are to produce a high-fidelity prototype of this tool and to write a paper describing our research and design.
Though this research is ongoing, there is some opportunity for a small number of students to begin in the Winter Quarter. We are particularly interesting in students with experience in the human-centered design process and with advanced prototyping skills (web and mobile), and/or students with development skills that can help with the software design and implementation of our tool (web scraping, web development, mobile development, databases, machine learning, etc).
If you would like to apply to join the existing group (for 2–3 credit hours of credit/no credit grade of HCDE 496/596), please send an email to Kate Starbird (kstarbi@uw.edu) with a few paragraphs describing why you are interested in the project, your relevant skills, and the number of credits you are seeking. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.

Kate Starbird
Investigating ICT use during Mass Convergence Events
This quarter, my directed research group will focus broadly on the use of ICT, including social media and mobile technology, during mass convergence events. Impactful events in the physical world are now triggering digital convergence in the online sphere. We will look at large-scale interaction and collaboration—including behavior that takes place completely online as well as online-offline coordination activity—during events such as natural and man-made disasters, entertainment and sports events, and political protests.
Possible events for analysis include the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, the 2011 Joplin Tornado, the first week of the Occupy Wall Street protest, the 2012 Olympics, or future events.
The goal of this group is to bring together students who can approach this domain from different perspectives, pooling a variety of skills (including qualitative, quantitative and computational). You will be encouraged to bring or find your own research questions within this space.
Three (broad) areas for research are:
  • Address specific questions about ICT-enabled human behavior during mass participation events, e.g.
  • Design tools for research and/or real-time analysis of social media interaction during these events, e.g.
  • Design tools to support the activities of those participating in these events (on-the-ground participants/fans/etc., emergency responders, organizers, digital volunteers, etc.)
Initially, the group will seek to understand the domain, sharing and discussing readings from research in the areas of crisis informatics, social media dynamics, crowdsourcing, etc. As the quarter progresses, we will work to identify and coalesce around specific research questions. End products may vary, depending upon the trajectory we take—publishing empirical research, designing and developing tools, etc. Long-term goals are to publish resulting work at appropriate conferences.
The group will meet weekly. Time and location TBD.
Please submit a one-page introduction to Kate Starbird (kstarbi@uw.edu) with an overview of your background, skills, and interest in the topic.

 


Jennifer Turns

 

Reflective Practice in HCDE and Engineering Education

This graduate-student focused research group might be of interest to you if one or more of the following questions appeal to you:

  • Have you heard of “reflective practice” and wondered what it is about?
  • Are you interested in “reflective practice” and specifically exploring resources that support reflective practice?
  • Are you curious about how reflective practice fits with the domain specifics of human-centered design and/or engineering education?
  • Are you wondering how “reflective practice” compares to other visions of practice, such as capable practice, technical practice, activist practice, and ethical practice?
  • Would you like to be involved in shaping the development of resources that help HCDE practitioners and/or engineering education practitioners be move reflective?

In the Reflective Practitioner, Donald Schon reported on his efforts to understand the epistemology of practice that underlies professional expertise.  His findings brought “reflective practice” into the foreground for a variety of professional fields. Many strategies have been used to help professionals and emerging professionals in a variety of fields to move toward a reflective practice ideal. For example, the book “Reflective Practice" represents a handbook for professionals in the health and social care professions. What might such a handbook look like for professionals in human centered design or engineering education—two professional areas where working with people is key but the focus on reflective practice has been less central?

In this research group, participants will engage in the question:  To what extent does the book Reflective Practice represent a valuable starting point for supporting professionals in moving toward the reflective practice ideal?  We will answer this question by (a) engaging in the reflection activities described in the book and (b) having subsequent discussions of how the exercises align with, or could better align with, the scholarly fields of HCDE and engineering education.

This research group is open to graduate students interested in reflective practice for HCDE and graduate students interested in engineering education.  If the group does not fill with graduate students, there may be a small number of spots for advanced undergraduate students.

All participants will be asked to sign up for 2 credits.  To participate, applicants need to...

  • be available for the weekly meeting (Tuesday, 4:00-5:30)
  • have access to the book Reflective Practice by Janet Hargreaves and Louise Page (an online version is available through the UW library)
  • be willing to complete reflection activities as described in the book
  • be willing to share their reflections and thoughts in a larger group
  • be interested in how to help others engage in reflective practice

To apply, send an email to jturns@uw.edu describing your interest in the work and how you could help the group move the work forward.

 

Process blogging as professional/reflective practice: Challenges and opportunities

  • What are process blogs and why create them? What is process blogging and why do it?
  • How are process blogs used by professionals?
  • What’s hard about process blogging, and how can we help individuals be more effective?
  • How might different perspectives on reflection be used to frame supports for process blogging?
  • How is process blogging experienced by emerging professionals?

Description: In the context of this research group, a process blog will be understood a blog where designers document and reflect on their design processes, insights, thoughts; and process blogging will be understood as a reflective activity.  The goal of the research group will be to start a conversation about process blogging as a professional and reflective practice, with a specific focus on process blogging as used in a large-scale, explorations course targeted at freshman and sophomore students.

Participants in the research group will be invited to engage in project ideation (i.e., what types of research questions might be interesting, with the questions above illustrating some possibilities), project piloting (i.e., engaging in pilot versions of answering select research questions), and project report-out (i.e., sharing results with those making instructional decisions related to process blogs and those engaged in research on reflection).  The specific activities of the group will emerge over the term.  

This research group is open to (a) HCDE students and (b) students who have taken HCDE 210 but are not yet HCDE students.  Students who have taken HCDE 210 can speak to the student experience of creating process blogs.  In addition, HCDE students with interest in process blogging as a professional practice and/or process blogging as a reflective practice are invited to apply.

All participants will be asked to sign up for 2 credits.  To participate, applicants need to be available for the weekly meeting (Thursday, 4:00-5;30) and also expect to work 4-5 hours per week.

Participants will have a chance to

  • Learn more about process blogging, reflection, and reflective practice
  • Practice using a design thinking approach applied to research (i.e., by ideating on questions, prototyping research designs, and using preliminary work to elicit “user” feedback)
  • Have impact--by generating information that can be used to refine processing blogging assignments used in HCDE classes.

If you are interested, you should send an email to jturns@uw.edu describing your interest in the work and how you could help the group move the work forward.

Slow technology and reflection: A reading group

This reading group will bring together students and faculty to read and discuss a broad range of papers and studies relevant to the design, evaluation, and theory of technologies that slow down the pace of information consumption for their users or otherwise promote reflection in some manner. Each week, there will be two students assigned to choose and lead the group on a discussion on a single paper they select. This will be a 2-credit hour course for HCDE 596, with 4 hours per week of reading and reading-related activity, and 2 hour per week of group discussion. 


Jenifer Turns, Mania Orand
Technology Use during Solo and Nomadic Travel

Pre-requisites: HCDE 210/other prototyping courses or equivalent experience, familiarity with UCD. 
Level: Junior, senior, and master’s level students with a strong design background; Master’s and PhD students with backgrounds in computer science, social science, and design

Are you interested in travel? Would you like to learn about solo and nomadic travelers’ use of technology while supporting their adventures through design? In this fun and challenging DRG, we will draw on theory to explore the design space for solo and nomadic travelers. We will learn about qualitative research, in-depth interviews, emotional design, and prototyping wearable technologies, and share our designs with solo travelers who visit our class.
While we will not be tackling Everest (or Mount Rainier) to evaluate our designs, we will have stimulating and inspiring conversations throughout the design process.
All students from BS to PhD who meet the requirements are welcomed to apply, but we are keeping this DRG relatively small (around 10) and are looking for a diverse group of dedicated and enthusiastic students who are interested in participating for 2 credits. To join the group or for questions, please email Mania Orand (orand@uw.edu) and include your relevant experience (preferably your portfolio) and a brief statement expressing your goals for participating.


Jennifer Turns
Investigating the socio systems side of HCDE

The newly designed/named HCDE program is still young and fluid in the formation process of defining it's unique identity. While HCI and the computer interactive lens of HCDE seems to have established it's place and opportunities more widely within the core requirements, the socio interactive lens of our program remains less so. We would like to make space to investigate, discuss what this aspect of HCDE is/could be; how it plays a role in our program; and ways we might consider encouraging/creating/fencing/balancing the necessary space for theory and investigation of the socio side of HCDE and the socio systems that are central to our program. This may include reading/research on theories, how other programs incorporate socio-systems, or reflections on our department's current areas of research.

Jennifer Turns
Life-logging, Quantified-self, and Reflection

Are you intrigued with the proliferation of technologies designed to help you keep track of your life?  Are you curious about people's commitments to tracking their activities?  Are you wondering what to do with the daily pictures you have taken of yourself, the trace of your exercise, or the log of your search behavior?  Are you interested in how to help people make sense of their personal data, or even how to design technologies to better support such sense-making and reflective activities? 
In this research group, we will explore such questions.  Based on a observation that current tools are good at collecting data but may be less than successful at helping participants effectively reflect on their data, our goal will be to imagine how to extend the design of tools so that they may more effectively support reflection.  We will start by developing a list of technologies in the life-logging/quantified-self arena, discussing theories of reflection that can be used to frame what people might do with their life-logs/quantified self data, and reading 2-3 existing studies of such tools.  Given this starting point, we will work as a group to find ways to move toward our redesign goals.  If interested in participating, please email Professor Jennifer Turns with brief description of your research interests.

Jennifer Turns
So what? Exploring the ideas of "implications for design" and "translation of research into practice"
Introduction: For disciplines like HCDE in which research is conducted in order to support improved practice, a common concern is the rate with which research findings influence change in practice. But what does it mean for research to inform practice? What are the mechanisms by which research informs practice? What are the roles of researchers in this process? Of practitioners? What could be done to accelerate the rate at which research is used to inform practice? There are the types of questions we will explore in this research group.
Main activity: In terms of activity, this research group will build on the work of two previous research groups (summer 2011, winter 2012). In particular, we will be looking analyzing research publications in order to understand the way in which implications for practice are represented in the publications. Part of the team will be focusing on the last steps of an analysis of the Journal of Engineering Education. The rest of the group will be using the same methodology to explore other prominent journals in the HCDE field.
What you will get out of this activity: Students who participate in this research group can expect to benefit in one or more of the following ways: (a) gaining a better appreciation of what is involved in translating research into practice, (b) gaining a better appreciation for how research articles in particular journals are framed/written, (c) learning new ways to read journal articles, and (d) gaining experience in content/discourse analysis. Since the research group will be looking at connections between research and practice, both research-oriented and practically-oriented students stand to benefit from the activity. Students in the previous two research groups came from very different perspectives (practitioner as well as academic) and previous participants found the activities eye-opening.
Logistics: Participants will register for 2 credits. We will schedule a time based on who is interested. Depending on who is interested, we may choose to meet later in the day (say 3:30–5:20 or 4:00–6:00) in order to make this open to more students.

Jennifer Turns
What does it mean to keep the user in mind when designing?
If you are interested in user-centered design (UCD), particularly the issue of what it means to keep the user in mind when designing, then the research group I am running in the fall 2008 quarter might be of interest to you. Below I address 1) what you will do in the research group, 2) the anticipated logistics, 3) what you can expect to learn, 4) the underlying research, and 5) how to get more information.
What you will do:  As a participant in the research group, you will help us analyzed already collected interview data in which engineering educators report on teaching decisions.  In particular, you will help us analyze how the educators take learners into account in these decisions.  Linking back to UCD, in this research group, we will be framing the teacher as the “designer” and the learner as the “user of the designs,” and thus asking how the teacher takes the learner into account is similar to asking how a user-centered designer takes users into account.
Logistics: We plan to meet between 10 and 12 on either Tuesday or Thursday (to be decided). We will announce the location once we know how many people will be participating. It is also possible/likely that the research group will continue into the winter quarter in order to pursue publication opportunities.
What you can expect to learn: As a participant in this research group, you can expect to gain insights into a) what it means for a designer to stay focused on a user, (through the data analysis activities, and through conversations with other group participants) and b) how to rigorously analyze interview data (through the data analysis activities and conversations about how to do these analyses rigorously). You may also have a chance to reflect on your own teaching as a result of this research group.
The underlying research: The NSF-funded research has been guided by the several broad questions: How do engineering educators make teaching decisions? How much agency do engineering educators have and what types of structures constrain or enable this agency? And (the above question), How do engineering educators take learners into account in their teaching decisions? The dataset consist of transcripts of interviews from thirty-one engineering educators representing all academic ranks and a wide variety of engineering disciplines. Several previous analyses of this data have already been published and will be available to participants.

Jennifer Turns
Understanding User Experience through Open-ended Survey Data
If you are interested in user experience research, techniques for analyzing open ended survey data, and/or the educational significance of experiences provided to students, then the research group I am running in the Fall 2008 quarter might be of interest to you. Below I address 1) what you will do in the research group, 2) the anticipated logistics, 3) what you can expect to learn, 4) the underlying research, and 5) how to get more information.
What participants will do: Participants in the research group will help us analyzed already collected survey data in which research participants reported on their experience of constructing one of two types of professional portfolios. The survey consisted mainly of open-ended questions designed to elicit information about their process, the meaning they ascribed to the process, and their takeaways.
Logistics: We plan to meet between 10 and 12 on either Tuesday or Thursday (to be decided). We will announce the location once we know how many people will be participating. It is also possible/likely that the research group will continue into the winter quarter in order to pursue publication opportunities.
What you can expect to learn: Participants in this research group can expect to gain insights into a) how to conduct user experience research generally (through the data analysis activities, and through conversations with other group participants), b) how to analyze open-ended survey data (through the data analysis activities and conversations about how to do these analyses rigorously), and c) the educational significance of constructing professional portfolios (through discussions of how to interpret the different ways that students experienced the portfolio activity).
The underlying research: The NSF-funded research has been guided by the following broad questions: How do students experience the construction of different types of professional portfolios and how does the design of the portfolio assignment affect their experience? What is the educational significance of constructing professional portfolios and how does the educational significance very depending on what type of portfolio students are asked to construct? In particular, the research has been exploring how construction of portfolios help students engage in identity development, make sense of their classes and educational activities, improve their metacognitive awareness of what they know, enhance their understanding of the importance and significance of their knowledge, and engage in critical reflection on their own assumptions. The study that gave rise to this data was conducted during the winter 2008 and spring 2008 academic terms, and built on studies conducted during the previous 4 years. A total of 69 students constructed portfolios and responded to the final survey.

Jennifer Turns
Design Studies Research Group
During the Spring 2008 quarter, members of the Design Studies Research Group will have the opportunity to read and discuss research papers that (1) address empirical approaches for understanding how designers engage in the practice of design and (2) describe theoretical frameworks of design. Readings will approach design activities and designers across different disciplines (e.g., information design, engineering, architecture & urban planning, writing as design, software design, etc.). During the quarter, members of this research group will synthesize larger themes across the readings and discuss how current research in design studies apply to emerging trends across design practices. Additionally, research group members will have the opportunity to think about how current trends in the science of design can be applied to design education here at the University of Washington and beyond. Weekly activities in the research group will be structured around a set of readings that are chosen during the first week of the quarter. During the quarter, the research group will accomplish some or all of the following:
  • Critically discuss one research paper per week as a group (sometimes two if short).
  • Identify cross-discipline commonalities and differences in the practice of design.
  • Relate design research to current and emerging issues in design practice (issues may include user-centeredness, globalization of practice, designing for sustainability, etc.).
  • Develop theoretical representations (e.g., concept maps, taxonomies, etc.) of the overall space of the science of design.
  • Consider how this knowledge can be applied to design curriculum at the university level.
  • Begin the development of an online information knowledge base on design research that can be used within design education.
The research group will meet for 1.5 hours each week during the Spring 2008 quarter. During the meetings we will discuss weekly readings and update each other on our progress in identifying larger themes and structuring our findings for electronic distribution. The size of the research group is limited.

Jennifer Turns
Data Analysis
Participants in this research group will have the opportunity to learn more about a) how to conduct qualitative research, b) the impact of one technology on one type of learning, and c) how students prepare for professional practice and develop professional identity. In addition, participants in the research group will have an opportunity to reflect on their own preparation for professional practice. This NSF funded research focuses on the impact of one learning technology (electronic portfolios) on professional identity and professional preparation of engineering students. Subjects in the current study will be constructing professional portfolios and providing data about how this activity impacts their sense of professional identity and their preparedness for professional engineering practice. Data collection will involve surveys of all participants, interviews of a select set of participants, and observation notes collected during portfolio building sessions. Members of the TC496/596 research group will analyze survey data (and possibly observation and interview data) that will be being collected during Winter 2008 (concurrent with the research group). Because the survey data was designed to support a number of different analyses, participants will have the opportunity to select an analysis consistent with their interest area (e.g., what do participants say about professional identity?, what do they say about the meaning of their past experiences?, do the participants experience the portfolio task as a rhetorical event?, as a learning event?).

Jennifer Turns
Laboratory for User-Centered Engineering Education (LUCEE)
In the Laboratory for User-Centered Engineering Education (LUCEE), we are devoted to applying the methods of user-centered design to the challenges of engineering education. In our work, we focus on two classes of users in engineering education: students and educators. We use qualitative and quantitative research techniques to better understand these user populations and to design products to help these users accomplish their goals more effectively. The Laboratory for User-Centered Engineering Education is seeking students interested in directed research group credit. In the Fall of 2005, we are offering the following two opportunities:
  • Study of Engineering Educators' Decision Making: Students joining this project will use a subset of previously collected interview transcripts as a springboard to explore qualitative coding methods. Qualitative coding is a process by which researchers analyze data (transcripts in our case) to discover the study participants' subjective meanings and interpretations. Activities will include: reviewing decision-making models, building a coding structure, coding transcripts, and aggregating the coding results into larger themes. Our end-point will be a rich description of engineering faculty's decision-making processes in the context of teaching.
  • Case Studies of Participant Experiences in the Engineering Teaching Portfolio Program: The Engineering Teaching Portfolio Program is an eight-week seminar in which graduate students and post-docs prepare a teaching portfolio in a peer-intensive environment. During the summer of 2005, researchers collected interview, video, concept map, and survey data in order to capture information relating to the impacts of the program on participant and the processes leading to these impacts. TC 496/596 students joining this research project in the fall will develop case studies of individual participants' experiences and subsequently prepare a cross-case analysis focused on commonalities and differences in the participants' experiences.' ); information.
  • Students joining either of these projects are invited to attend weekly LUCEE research group meetings. These meetings are devoted to research issues spanning the entire collection of LUCEE projects and the entire range of research issues. In the past we have used these meetings for activities such as (a) reviewing drafts of conference papers, journal papers, and proposals, (b) discussing readings of common interest to the group, (c) providing guidance on the research projects of team members, (d) brainstorming dissemination strategies for specific projects, and (e) discussing ethical issues in research.

Jennifer Turns
Lifelong Learning Reading Seminar
We will start with Pedagogy of the Oppressed and then read an additional book of the group's choosing.
At UW, 1 credit = 3 hours of activity. For our seminar, I expect that this will translate to 2 hours of reading and 1 hour of discussion. The only other thing that will be required is a final statement about your learning in this seminar and how that learning prepares you for your future.
Prep for Day 1: In order for us to make a solid start, I would like each of you to find a nugget of information that is related to our proposed activity (i.e., related to the author, the actual book, the topic of lifelong learning, etc) and something you think will help stimulate our conversation. Please bring your nugget on a piece of paper.
Day 1 activity: During the first session, I will share my motivations for choosing this book and each of you will have the opportunity to share your motivations for enrolling in the seminar. We will also use the information nuggets to start talking about the book, the author, and the topic. Finally we will go over the plan for the term and set up a shared understanding of how we can have the most effective discussions together.

Jennifer Turns
Coding Survey Data
I am interested in forming a research group to help me analyze survey data collected from students who constructed portfolios as part of a research study. The survey data contains both closed-ended and open-ended items. We will base our analysis on an already completed analysis of a subset of the data. That analysis was presented at a conference in July. As a result of that analysis, we have already committed to a theoretical framework for analyzing the data and developed some initial expectations about what we might see in the rest of the data analysis.
Participation in upcoming research group should be a good opportunity to:
  • experience how theory is used to guide analysis of data
  • see how collaborative analysis of data can be organized
  • learn about a new set of theories (theories of identity/becoming, reflection)
  • learn about publication venues (we are currently considering
  • Teaching in Higher Education as a venue for the paper), and even
  • gain insight into what students are thinking about when they engage in educational activities
Because so much work has already been done on this project, it is not anticipated that participation in this research group would result in authorship on the article the analysis will support. However, participation in the group could definitely lay the foundation for future collaborations leading to publication.
We are looking for a relatively small group of people who are each interested in between 2 and 5 credits. The actual organization of the work will be based on the number of people interested. If you are interested, let me a) what interests you about the project and b) how many credits you would be seeking. I will then figure out our next step.

Mark Zachry

Picture to Practice: Visualizing Everyday Technology Use
Spring 2017

The focus of this DRG is the development and refinement of a mixed methods approach for understanding technology use in context, combining tool-based visualization, reflection exercises, interviews, and participatory design. Our approach will aim to inform and inspire new possibilities for context-sensitive designs.

In brief
How do you think about your technology use? Given the time needed and the tools required, how would you picture your interactions with technology visually? Ultimately, what stories would your interactions with technology tell about you, and about others? Starting in autumn quarter, this DRG will aim to answer some of these questions, as well as to ask a few new questions along the way.

Who we are
This DRG is offered by Professor Mark Zachry with Michael Gilbert and Elizabeth Churchill, User Experience Research (and former HCDE alum) and Director of User Experience at Google, respectively.

Who we’re looking for
We’re planning to work with a small group of students (6-10) who have proven experience in design (Illustrator, Photoshop, and the like), visualization (Javascript, D3.js, etc), or research techniques (our approach to interactions with technology will be largely qualitative). In the context of this applied research project, DRG participants will have opportunities to develop these skills while applying them.

What we’ll aim to do
During the quarter, we’ll put our own technology use under the microscope. We will aim to start with a brief background in current methodologies to understand technology use, including Experience Sampling Methodology (ESM), diary studies, mobile device app usage analysis, and the ensuing abstractions, representations, and visualizations that result. From there, we will look at our own mobile device usage. Utilizing the methodologies above in a participatory design process, we will aim to better understand and reflect on our interactions with the myriad technologies that surround us on a daily basis.  

Please note that data and conclusions generated by these processes will be shared with Google, who may use it to improve Google's existing products and services or to develop new ones. Ultimately, the research group will aim to have this work culminate in a submission to a relevant research conference in HCI.

If you’re interested…
Please contact Professor Mark Zachry (zachry@uw.edu) with a statement of interest and a list of your qualifications (Adobe design tools, Javascript/D3 production, or research). Please note that you must be a student already accepted into an HCDE program (BS, MS, PhD) to register. All participants will register for 2 or 3 credits, depending on the scope of research they intend to accomplish during the quarter. The DRG will likely be offered for all quarters during the academic year.

 

Mark Zachry
Picture to Practice: Visualizing Everyday Technology Use

2016-2017

The focus of this DRG is the development and refinement of a mixed methods approach for understanding technology use in context, combining tool-based visualization, reflection exercises, interviews, and participatory design. Our approach will aim to inform and inspire new possibilities for context-sensitive designs.

In brief
How do you think about your technology use? Given the time needed and the tools required, how would you picture your interactions with technology visually? Ultimately, what stories would your interactions with technology tell about you, and about others? Starting in autumn quarter, this DRG will aim to answer some of these questions, as well as to ask a few new questions along the way.

Who we are
This DRG is offered by Professor Mark Zachry with Michael Gilbert and Elizabeth Churchill, User Experience Research (and former HCDE alum) and Director of User Experience at Google, respectively.

Who we’re looking for
We’re planning to work with a small group of students (6-10) who have proven experience in design (Illustrator, Photoshop, and the like), visualization (Javascript, D3.js, etc), or research techniques (our approach to interactions with technology will be largely qualitative). In the context of this applied research project, DRG participants will have opportunities to develop these skills while applying them.

What we’ll aim to do
During the quarter, we’ll put our own technology use under the microscope. We will aim to start with a brief background in current methodologies to understand technology use, including Experience Sampling Methodology (ESM), diary studies, mobile device app usage analysis, and the ensuing abstractions, representations, and visualizations that result. From there, we will look at our own mobile device usage. Utilizing the methodologies above in a participatory design process, we will aim to better understand and reflect on our interactions with the myriad technologies that surround us on a daily basis.  

Please note that data and conclusions generated by these processes will be shared with Google, who may use it to improve Google's existing products and services or to develop new ones. Ultimately, the research group will aim to have this work culminate in a submission to a relevant research conference in HCI.

If you’re interested…
Please contact Professor Mark Zachry (zachry@uw.edu) with a statement of interest and a list of your qualifications (Adobe design tools, Javascript/D3 production, or research). Please note that you must be a student already accepted into an HCDE program (BS, MS, PhD) to register. All participants will register for 2 or 3 credits, depending on the scope of research they intend to accomplish during the quarter. The DRG will likely be offered for all quarters during the academic year.

If you have any questions about the technology or the general scope of the project, feel free to reach out to Michael Gilbert (mdgilbert@google.com).

Meetings
This DRG will meet on Thursdays, 4-5.

 
Mark Zachry
Organizing HCI: Designing a Task Group to Shape Perceptions of Human Computer Interaction
Who We Are Looking For
Do you have a keen interest in Human Computer Interaction (HCI)? A desire to explore the field in a collaborative setting? A desire to share your knowledge with those in the larger community? Have you ever wanted to participate in the design of a tool intended to facilitate the process of online teamwork and distributed coordination?
Overview
In spring quarter, the Organizing HCI research group will focus on creating an online project group to both elevate the public’s perception and understanding of human computer interaction and, through that process, to create a tool that helps those same online groups work together.
The primary focus of this research group will be to explore how human computer interaction is represented in one of the largest, most widely recognized and definitive reference sources used by people today – Wikipedia. In a series of task sprints, members of the group will:
  • Develop a strategic campaign for organizing its efforts
  • Research knowledge standards and best practices in the field to contribute to article content
  • Jointly participate in the design of a Chrome plug-in tool to support the group’s efforts by visualizing its collaborative efforts
  • Prepare a research poster and paper describing the DRG’s efforts during the quarter
The goal for the quarter is to engage the research group participants in a design conversation about a newly formed group and its efforts in support of discovering the design requirements for a tool to support such collaborative efforts. Following techniques of participatory design, all research group participants will have opportunities to engage in ideation, sketching, and prototyping activities related to the new tool. Together, we will develop new ideas for how the system design should be implemented to support desirable forms of distributed social interaction focused on advancing knowledge about our field.
The Experience
During the quarter, everyone in the Organizing HCI research group will participate in a project to improve HCI-related content in Wikipedia. By reflecting on our own practices in this project, we will concurrently develop the requirements for a system that would ideally support such collaborative online efforts among teams of like-minded but distributed individuals. During the quarter, the group will engage in design discussions about the tool, including conversations about its functionality and interface. Please note that participants in the research will need to have a user account on Wikipedia, but do not need to have prior editing experiences.
Meeting Time
The group will meet Mondays, 4:45-5:45, in Sieg 128. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.
Registration
Students will register for 1 or 2 credit hours of credit/no credit grade of either HCDE 496 or HCDE 596. To register, please send a short message with a brief biographical introduction to the instructor at zachry@uw.edu.

Mark Zachry
Consuming Information: Identifying usage patterns associated with free online information resources

The internet contains a wealth of resources that provide high-quality information to the public for free. How do people decide which of these websites to visit when they want to learn something new? This directed research group will focus on developing a survey to find out where learners turn to find high-quality information on the internet, whether they are interested in digging deep into a particular subject, or getting a high level overview. 

Our general research questions include:

  • What free online resources are most popular with people interested in learning particular subjects, and why?
  • How do students use these free online resources to supplement official (university-provided) learning resources?
  • How does the way content is presented in these websites and in search engine queries influence who uses them, what they are used for, and how popular they are?

The research group is structured to run for two quarters. In Winter quarter, group members conducted a literature review and developed a set of survey questions, identified target populations, and piloted the survey. In Spring quarter, students will deploy the survey to the target population, and analyze the results.

The results will be published online and shared with a non-profit foundation that seeks to understand the information-seeking behavior of people who use publicly available online information resources. Students who participate in the research group (either quarter) will be listed as research contributors. 

This group is not currently accepting new participants. If you have any questions, please send an email message to Mark Zachry (zachry@uw.edu). 


Mark Zachry
Current Research in Social Computing
This reading group, designed for doctoral students preparing to conduct research related to social computing, meets weekly to discuss recently published research in the area. Group participants nominate articles for discussion and take turns leading discussions. The group is co-facilitated by Professor Mark Zachry (HCDE) and Professor David McDonald (iSchool).
Group size is limited. If you would like to participate, please contact Mark Zachry (zachry@uw.edu) with a statement about your research interests. The group meets TBD. 

 
Mark Zachry
Organizing HCI: Taking a User-Centered Design Approach to Improving Small Group Coordination
(Offered jointly with Professor David McDonald and Michael Gilbert)
Who We Are Looking For
Do you have a keen interest in the broader issues of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), the desire to explore those issues in a collaborative setting, or the desire to share your knowledge or particular experience with HCI to those in the larger community? Have you ever wanted to participate in the design of a tool intended to facilitate the process of online teamwork and distributed coordination (because, really, who hasn't)? If so, well, you are in luck.
Overview
For the autumn quarter, the Organizing HCI research group's focus will be two-fold.  First, the group will continue the design and evaluation of a tool to facilitate small group coordination in online spaces, taking a human-centered approach to the ongoing and iterative development of this tool.  And second, both through the evaluation of this tool and through continued interaction within the online group, we aim to elevate the public's perception and understanding of human computer interaction through contributions to one of the most widely recognized and definitive reference sources used by people today – Wikipedia.  In a series of task sprints, members of the group will:
  • Research knowledge standards and best practices in the field to contribute to article content around the topic of Human Computer Interaction.
  • Create detailed personas outlining the needs and motivations of distributed online team members, as well as use case scenarios in which these personas would be active.
  • Evaluate the current incarnation of our Virtual Team Explorer, a custom tool created to facilitate online group work within the project space,using these scenarios and personas.
  • Prepare a research poster and paper describing the DRG's efforts during the quarter.
The goal for the quarter is to engage the research group participants in a design conversation about the means and mechanisms behind online group work, as well as the utility of the online tools we have created to support such collaborative efforts.  Together, we will develop new ideas for how the system design should be implemented to support desirable forms of distributed social interaction focused on advancing knowledge about our field.
The Experience
During the quarter, everyone in the Organizing HCI research group will participate in a project to improve HCI-related content in Wikipedia.  Throughout this process, the group will reflect on the means by which this content is organized and distributed efforts are mediated to inform the personas and scenarios that will structure the evaluation of our Virtual Team Explorer.
Meeting Time
The group will meet from 4:30 – 5:30 on Thursdays in 427 Sieg Hall.  Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.
Registration
Prior to registering, students must create an account on Wikipedia and create a basic user page. Students will register for 2 credit hours of credit/no credit grade for either HCDE 496 or HCDE 596.  To register, please send a short message with a brief biographical introduction and your Wikipedia editor name to zachry@uw.edu.
 
tl;dr
Be a part of a directed research group that will first, participate in an online WikiProject intended to increase understanding of issues and articles related to Human Computer Interaction, and second, will use the experience from #1 above to inform the evaluation of a tool intended to help ours and other.

 
Mark Zachry
Haystack Exchange: Designing a Technology to Support New Forms of Social Interaction
In spring quarter, the Haystack Exchange research group will focus on iteratively designing a new web-based technology for encouraging transactions of services among groups of people who are socially linked. The goal for the quarter is to engage the research group participants in a design conversation about a newly deployed technology that they will all be using during the quarter. Following techniques of participatory design, all research group participants will have opportunities to engage in ideation, sketching, and prototyping activities related to the new system. Together, we will develop new ideas for how the system design should be developed to support desirable forms of social interaction.
Motivation
Recognizing the potential for social media to transform human relationships, this project seeks to explore the characteristics of a system that would help facilitate mutually beneficial transactions among people who are willing to share expertise with each other. Our challenge this spring quarter will be developing our system in such a way that it supports these kinds of transactions in a useful way, reflecting the values of people who want to interact with one another around their different forms of expertise.
The Experience
During the quarter, everyone in the research group will use the Haystack Exchange system to trade skills (e.g., editing, tutoring, image production) with others in the research group Periodically during the quarter, the group will engage in design discussions about the system, including conversations about its functionality and interface. At the end of the quarter, all participants will present an alternate system design, repositioning the technology in a new use-case scenario. These designs will be evaluate for appropriateness and technical feasibility.
Meeting Time
The group will meet from 3:30–4:30 on Wednesdays in Sieg Hall. Meetings are mandatory for all registered students.
Registration
Students will register for 2 credit hours of credit/no credit grade of either HCDE 496 or HCDE 596. Enrollment is limited. To register, please send a short message with a brief biographical introduction to the instructor.

Mark Zachry
Design and Development for Social Translucence: The Re:Flex Project (2013)
Join our research group in spring 2013 to participate in the development of Re:Flex, a social behavior visualization tool attached to Wikipedia. This tool is at an advanced stage of development, and we are preparing to invite developers and UX specialists to participate in the next phase of the research project. Project opportunities in the spring quarter include development of new plug-ins for the tool bar and user experience design. You can learn more about Re:Flex from our recent research poster.
Individuals interested in joining the group should have proven experience with some aspect of website or tool design, from conception to completion (a portfolio showing finished products is preferred).
Development Roles
Individual interested in participating in a development role related to the project should have either:
  • At least one year of experience with relevant web technologies (Javascript, jQuery, HTML, CSS), or
  • Experience with interactive visualization of large data sets, using tools like D3, Protovis, etc.
UX/UI Roles
Individuals interested in participating in a ux/ui roles may either be involved in toolbar modeling from conception to high-fidelity prototype (design), or the set up an evaluation test of the toolbar using something like Mechanical Turk (theory/operations). Prior experience in one or the other of these areas is needed.
Individuals should also have experience with frequently used design applications (including Photoshop, inDesign, etc), or experience with prototyping full-featured web applications using tools like Axure, Balsamiq, etc.
Meeting Time
The research group will meet Wednesdays, 5–6 pm.
Joining the Group
If interested in joining the group, please contact me via email (zachry@uw.edu) with a statement about your interests and your qualifications to participate in a development or ux/ui oriented role. Space in the group is limited so if there are more people interested in participating than we have room to accommodate, I will prioritize based on relevant skill sets.

Mark Zachry
Current Research in Social Computing (2013)
This reading group, designed for doctoral students preparing to conduct research related to social computing, meets weekly to discuss recently published research in the area. Group participants nominate articles for discussion and take turns leading discussions. The group is co-facilitated by Professor Mark Zachry (HCDE) and Professor David McDonald (iSchool).
Group size is limited. If you would like to participate, please contact Mark Zachry (zachry@uw.edu) with a statement about your research interests. Meeting time and location will be announced.

Mark Zachry
Communicative Practices in Virtual Workspaces (CPVW)
The Communicative Practices in Virtual Workspaces research group investigates emergent uses of digital technologies to coordinate work activities. Specifically, the group is concerned with developing knowledge about novel applications and integration of such technologies in the work of organizations—whether those organizations be  corporations, project-based federations of knowledge workers, or affiliated contributors to social media projects. Adopting and extending ideas from computer supported cooperative work, technical communication, human-computer interaction, and related fields, the group uses varied methods to explore communicative practices in virtual workspaces.
Participants will have the opportunity to work on existing projects and to propose work in complementary areas of inquiry. All research will support the group's overarching goals of investigating best practices and designing virtual tools associated with work activities in contemporary organizations. Projects for the group include:
  • Development of techniques for understanding social maneuvers (e.g., identity formation, regulation of behavior) in online interactions
  • Exploration of methods for using computer-use data to create visualizations that support reflective knowledge work
  • Development of tools for sensemaking about online work activities
The group will meet once per week to share results and discuss ongoing projects. The size of the research group is limited. People interested in participating should contact Mark Zachry (zachry [at] u.washington.edu) with a message explaining their interest in the group and indicating what types of activities they might like to work on during the quarter. Students with strong backgrounds in Web 2.0 technologies, visual design, and/or programming are particularly encouraged to apply. Participants in this research group will enroll for 1-3 credits (graded cr./no cr.) through HCDE 596 (for graduate students) or HCDE 496 (for undergraduate students).

Mark Zachry
Social Perspectives on the Design of Online Communities
Social psychology research and theory can improve our understanding of the adoption and use of social media. This research group will explore the connections researchers have made between social psychology theories of individual behavior and behavior in group settings and the design of social media technologies. The group will consider the impact of social psychological theories such as theories of collective effort, interpersonal bond formation, goal setting, social comparison, persuasion, group identity formation, technology diffusion, and technology acceptance on research methodologies and design considerations of social media technologies. The group will read works by such researchers as Kraut, Resnick, Rogers, and Venkatesh, to identify themes, underlying compatibilities, and tensions among the different authors’ applications of social psychology theory to social media.
Questions to be considered include:
  • In what ways are social psychology studies and theories applicable to individual and group behavior in online social media contexts?
  • What impacts do social psychology theories have on HCI research methodologies and design of systems supporting online communities?
  • How do specific theoretical lenses help reveal (or obscure) invisible work, issues of in/exclusion, and organizational power dynamics?
The research group will meet weekly for seminar-style discussions of assigned readings. Participants will be responsible for reading all assigned materials, analyzing ideas across texts, contributing to an annotated bibliography, and actively participating in discussions. Meetings will be held Mondays, 3:30-4:30. Participants will enroll for 2 credits.
The group is designed for graduate students who have already completed HCDE 501. Group size is limited. To request an add code, please contact Professor Zachry.

Mark Zachry
Networks and Ecologies
Researchers have long conceptualized human interactions with (and through) technology using varied theoretical frameworks to account for the roles and  relationships of people, information, genres, and infrastructures. This research group will explore major contributions in two of the most notable frameworks: networks and ecologies. Examining the work of researchers from Human-Computer Interaction, Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Rhetoric, and Science and Technology Studies, the group will systematically consider the role that different conceptualizations of the human/technology relationship play in driving theory development, empirical research, and design. The group will read works by Nardi, Star, Spinuzzi, and Latour, identifying themes, underlying compatibilities, and tensions among the different authors’ network- and ecology-based theories.
Questions to be considered include:
  • How are human actions constrained or enabled by the technologies they use?
  • What do different understandings of human and technology interactions potentially contribute to designs that would improve computer-mediated collaborations?
  • How do specific theoretical lenses help reveal (or obscure) invisible work, issues of in/exclusion, and organizational power dynamics?
The research group will consist of a small, weekly 2-credit discussion seminar. Participants will be responsible for reading all assigned materials, analyzing ideas across texts, and actively participating in discussions.
The group is designed for graduate students and would be most appropriate for those who have already completed HCDE 501. Group size is limited. Meetings will be held Thursday afternoons. To request an add code, please contact Professor Zachry.