Mark Haselkorn and Mark Zachry address maritime security

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

HCDE Professors Mark Haselkorn and Mark Zachry, and Senior Research Scientist Keith Butler, have been awarded federal funding to research and analyze how Puget Sound agencies contribute to Maritime Security during daily operations. This project is entitled the Puget Sound Operational Information Sharing Requirements Analysis.

After 9/11, research that focused on disaster, emergency and incident preparedness, response, and recovery increased dramatically. Everyone from large government units to small nonprofit organizations rushed to plan how they would operate in the event of a crisis. This increased focus on emergency operations was generally to the exclusion of research analyzing and understanding routine daily operations, yet this understanding is integral to an effective and efficient transition from routine to emergency operations. This understanding is particularly important for the large and diverse community of organizations responsible for Puget Sound maritime regional safety and security. The complexity of the Puget Sound maritime region results in many opportunities for aligning workflows, information flows, IT and communication systems through research and analysis of daily operations.

To tackle this challenge, the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE) has been awarded federal funding to research and analyze how Puget Sound agencies contribute to Maritime Security during daily operations. This project, entitled the Puget Sound Operational Information Sharing Requirements Analysis, will be led by HCDE Professor Mark Haselkorn. The research team comprises Professors Mark Haselkorn and Mark Zachry, Senior Research Scientist Keith Butler, Applied Physics Lab Center Director David Jones, PhD students Melissa Braxton and Michael McLeod, and logistician for the 833rd Transportation Battalion Chris Little. The project is currently funded for Fiscal Year 2014.

Our national security depends on our ability to share the right information, with the right people, at the right time. The Puget Sound maritime region was selected because it is a model of regional complexity. In addition to the seven ports and international border in Puget Sound, optimizing and aligning maritime security requires coordination and collaboration across numerous federal, state, local, tribal, international, public, and private entities—all of whom are key stakeholders. As stakeholders who already collaborate well, this project is designed to enable a perspective on the entire system that individual organizations do not have the time, resources or authority to analyze.

The initial step of the project will establish a robust baseline for how key stakeholder organizations currently manage mission critical information in support of their complex daily operations supporting maritime security. During this critical step the team will be meeting with stakeholders at all levels.